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130

The three holes are perfectly spaced, and too clean/consistent on both sides to be a rush job with a handheld drill. The dimples on the bottom suggest to me they were punched on a specially made jig. Look close at the photo and you can see the vestiges of a rectangle around all three holes, making about a 2-hole-width margin around the holes. The ...


54

I can't find a definitive link but there are a few reasons, a lot of which were already covered in the comments. One, the style in your picture makes the whole place easier to clean. You can hose down the floors in one go and there are not so many joins between the walls and the floors for gunk to build up. (EDIT: in your picture you can see that the ...


44

Why would the TSA/CBP/other agency drill holes into the bag, when they could've simply opened it? Holes are normally drilled when a suspicious trace shows up from another test - for example, there may have been an anomaly on the x-ray, or a sniffer dog may have given an indication. Smugglers are extremely adept these days at concealments - customs ...


26

Why do you need to give them an excuse? [Currently] we have the right to opt-out, no questions asked. Having to explain yourself eats away at this right. I've never been asked why I opted-out, but if I was, I think I would say something like "to protest overly-burdensome security regulations". Which is the truth.


23

Although the law is on your side, the people engaging in moral policing is on rise in these days, especially northern India. Be cautious. Let me address the situations one by one. Going to restaurant - Safe Shopping Mall - Safe Walking on roads - Mostly Safe, refrain from PDAs (Public Displays of Affection) Movies - Safe, Stick to multiplexes. Park - Can ...


22

The main source of income for Frequent Flyer programs is not selling your information, but instead selling points. Any time you earn points/miles from using a credit card that is affiliated with a frequent flyer program, the bank that issued the card has to purchase those miles/points from the frequent flyer program. The same is true for any other programs ...


14

You need to read the privacy policy and terms and conditions of your specific airline's program as they should detail if they share any information and with whom. Keep in mind some information sharing is mandated by the regulator or the country (such as API); this is simply a cost of traveling. The main source of revenue is selling points to other ...


13

There are wallet-like holders specifically designed to keep your passport and some other cards (credit card, healthcare card etc) They look like this and can be bought in just about any airport shop I've been to anywhere in the world. This thing is though you can't keep anything on you, everything you're carrying on the plane has to go in those plastic ...


11

The bottom "gaps" are for ADA. Minimum 12" so feet and foot rests clear...I believe. The cracks between doors are just poor construction tolerances that nobody in the States seems to care about.


11

USCBP is known to drill into luggage in order to check for explosive material or illicit substances. A few years ago there was a minor uproar over customs officials drilling into a West Indian cricketer's bat when his team was touring in the US. This is not done trivially; usually, suspicion is raised because of some other test, or because X-rays or other ...


11

To directly answer the title question, it appears that the answer is "Yes, if you want to enter the country." You might be able to refuse the request, but then you might be denied entry. The following information is from the advice that the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Consular Affairs provides to U.S. citizens traveling to Israel: Video cameras ...


11

I could find a report on Portuguese tenancy law by Bremen University. While legal aspects regarding private rental may be quite different from tenancy laws, I assume it still serves as an indication here. Citing (p. 138 f., footnotes removed): Is the surveillance of certain parts (e.g. corridors) of the building lawful and usual? The legislation ...


10

I tried the radiation argument the first time, just after they were introduced, but this argument doesn't seem to be too valid now since the millimetre wave scanners aren't very powerful. Who told you this? The guys at the gate who don't want to pat you down? Tell them you only take medical advice from certified doctors and PhD's.


10

As an European I was always uncomfortable to use any public facility in USA, for the same reason and I asked myself, over and over, the same question "Why????" . The official answer is here where you'll find this stunning ABSURD reason: STALL DOORS To prevent unnecessary queuing, anyone entering the restroom should be able to easily determine the ...


10

I can see the arguments about it being easier to clean, and perhaps spying is good for safety, but what's the deal with urinals? Often times they are squeezed uncomfortably close together, and most don't have a guard wall between them. In these situations, it takes some intense concentration to not accidentally get an eye full of full frontal. What possible ...


10

There are cases of customs and immigration demanding the passwords to phones or laptops, and then taking them out of sight of the passenger to use them and search them. Apparently by law you must provide these passwords when asked, and you may not follow the officers around to see what they do with your devices (such as putting USB sticks into them to copy ...


10

You can get yourself a privacy screen filter: It works by severely reducing the viewing angle of the screen, so that it's only readable by the user who's right in front of it. For example, here's how it looks on an iPhone. Unless you value privacy above anything else, I suggest you get a detachable model or a phone pocket with a privacy filter built into ...


8

Asking what's “legal” for “governments” could bring up some interesting philosophical questions but generally speaking there are no strongly binding global rules beyond what states commit themselves to through treaties, certainly not regarding privacy. Therefore, what is deemed legal could vary a lot between countries. I would also question that government ...


8

You don't need to give any excuse at all. They can't force you undergo this procedure, you volunteer to it. If you don't want to - then you don't. They'll have to use the good old manual search on you. That said - why do you care? Do you believe that it will cause you any damage? I'm pretty sure we're all exposed to much higher levels of radiation from our ...


8

Shamelessly converting a comment into an answer, according to the EFF there are consequences for US citizens denying encription keys to CBP. Whilst US citizens cannot be denied admission into the US, their devices can be seized: At the U.S. border. Agents may ask travelers to unlock their devices, provide their device passwords, or disclose their social ...


6

You would be disappointed if you thought you had more rights entering the UK than the US. From this article: UK activist Muhammad Abdur Rabbani has been charged with obstruction of justice after refusing to provide encryption passwords to police at an airport stop in London. He is due to appear in court in Westminster, England on June 20th. ...


6

The best practice is not to keep sensitive and/or business critical data in a portable computer or device. The hard drive could fail anytime, the computer would be lost, broken, stolen. The best scenario is to host the data on any secure counter or server, which would be accessed either thought a VPN as @BurhanKhalid suggested or to be put somewhere in the ...


6

If the CBP feels the need, they will either read through your mail and other apps manually on the device, or dump the device using something like one of these Cellebrite devices. You can see a CBP documentary where this is used on youtube: I've entered the US dozens if not hundreds of times and nobody has ever asked to look at my phones, but who knows how ...


5

Well, you can still try the privacy argument, among others. Here's a summarised version of what Wikipedia has to say: Privacy advocates are concerned about the use of active millimeter wave technology because it effectively implements routine and, in many cases, mandatory virtual strip searches. It allows screeners to see the surface of the skin ...


5

In addition to the privacy screen suggested in the other answer, there's a couple of strategies I use for this: First and foremost, I wouldn't open or watch anything really private while on public transport. Just as you wouldn't read your credit card number out loud on the phone while in public you probably shouldn't read confidential e-mails on the train. ...


4

Hey Sarah here is one possible solution, Keep your passport IN YOUR HAND when you go through the security check. Note that, anyway, in some/many locations they make you do this. Your bag goes through, and you walk through the scanner with your pport/boarding pass, which you show to the scanning-person. Regarding generally where to keep your passport: ...


4

IANAL and it depends on the jurisdiction. The following is what happens for Canadian shows: For a creative type show, generally they ask permission to film you or they they set up cameras that records quite a lot but then they request permission to have you appear in the show, if they find your participation interesting. Much more is usually filmed than is ...


4

I would bet there's a line in the small print when you booked the flight about them being allowed to record you at any point for security purposes. Arguably with a growing number of cases of passengers getting drunk and/or abusive with airline staff, a body camera might seem like a good way of making sure there is evidence of exactly what went on in any ...


3

When I went to Israel I had no problems flying in or out. I'm white and blonde. My friend who is olive skinned and brunette was stopped both times and her bags were searched and she was detained for questioning for about half an hour. No log ins requested though. A month ago friend of mine went to Israel on birthright. Also brown hair and darker skin. She ...


3

For international trips, I use an wallet that hangs inside my trousers on a belt-loop. The fabric is extra-reinforced. This isn't my brand, but it's the same idea. My wife prefers the money pouch (similar to this). Travelling together I usually give her my passport too, and we watch very carefully for the tray containing the passports to come through the ...


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