8

You do not need a passport to travel back to the US, but you will need a valid US Permanent Resident Card (Green Card) with you. If you've been out of the US for more than a year, you'll also need a Reentry Permit or Returning Resident Visa and may want to consult an immigration lawyer for assistance in making your case that you haven't abandoned permanent ...


7

Yes. That's the general rule for traveling as a dual national (or multiple national) -- entering and leaving one of the countries of nationality should be done with that country's passport. For other countries, use whichever passport is most convenient, but you should always enter and leave a country with the same passport.


6

The premise of this question is an assumption that a traveler with a visa issued by a Schengen state needs to enter the Schengen area through the state that issued his visa. There is no such requirement, however. A Schengen visa is valid for seeking entry through any of the Schengen external borders. A traveler with a single-entry visa issued by a Schengen ...


5

I would advise using the new passport on both situations, and to get the VISA on it. Nowadays you can go or may be even required to go to electronic check-in queues when entering several countries. In other countries you may get faster though immigration using the biometric one. Official might also do not like the old, non-biometric one. I was using one ...


4

I am a Peruvian living in Mexico with Mexican Permanent Residency and I want to visit the UK - Mexican nationals do not need a visa, do I need a visa? Yes, you do - you hold Mexican residency but only your nationality counts in this case, so you would apply to the UK for a Standard Visitor Visa (or whichever visa you need) under your Peruvian nationality. ...


4

As others have said, the rule you cite is for deciding which country should evaluate a traveler's Schengen visa application. For travelers who do not require a Schengen visa, the rule is irrelevant. As you note, embassies are very picky with this But not "at least when processing visa applications"; they're picky about the rule only when processing ...


3

A US transit visa allows transits of up to 29 days. Presumably this is a relic of an earlier era in which long-distance travel by means other than air was still common. In light of that fact, the time waiting is definitely not too long. However, since a transit visa and a tourist visa both cost $160, and the tourist visa is valid for 10 years by default ...


3

As a Peruvian Citizen, you do not need a visa if you do not enter the UK i.e for an airside transit. This is clearly mentioned on the Gov.UK website. On the other hand if you do decide to go land side, then you may be eligible for the transit without visa concession. You might be eligible for the ‘transit without visa concession’ if: - you arrive and ...


2

It depends on the course of study you're pursuing. If it is less than six months, or if it is an English language course and less than 11 months, you can apply for a student visitor visa: https://www.gov.uk/study-visit-visa If the course of study is longer, you should apply for a (Child) student visa: https://www.gov.uk/child-study-visa The pages don't ...


2

Yes, provided you have a current US visa. Peru does not participate in the Visa Waiver Program so a visa is required to enter the United States. This is the case for all connections as no US airport has a transit zone. Note, the visa refusal rate for Peru is quite low, ~20%. Whether or not it's worth applying is something only you can determine.


2

There’s no ban but for transiting you need to apply for a C1 (transit) or B1/B2 (business/tourism) non-immigrant visa: https://pe.usembassy.gov/visas/nonimmigrant-visas/ Both B and C visas will require an application, a fee, and an interview. They cost the same so if you’re thinking of visiting the USA in the future or you want to sightsee while you transit,...


1

Your BRP is evidence of your immigration status in the UK https://www.gov.uk/biometric-residence-permits You will have to show it along with your valid national passport before you begin your return journey, and again when you re-enter the United Kingdom. The permit proves that you are allowed to return to the United Kingdom, but it cannot be used instead of ...


1

As stated by Timatic, the database used by Airlines: Visa required, except for Holders of onward tickets transiting on the same calendar day. So no, he does not Need a visa


1

Your itinerary sounds reasonable to me. Your interview is already in the past so there isn't a whole lot you can do for this application but in general, when dealing with consular officials or border guards, just be genuine, never lie but don't apologise and try not to be too nervous. Some details might indeed suggest that there are some special concerns ...


1

The decision was that i didn't provide evidence of my friend's personal circumstances and is unclear if i have a friend in the UK to visit. Why did you provide your friend's contact ? As you provided it, UKBA would require evidence of his financial circumstances and that he is a legal alien in UK. Did you try to apply under Family visit visa ? It would ...


1

if you arrive at Heathrow and continue your flight also at Heathrow, you won't have a Problem. Make sure that you Need not to Change the Airport. Sometimes the fligts arrive at Heathrow and continue on an other Airport like Stanstedt. Then you Need a Transfer visa because you are entering UK to go to the next Airport


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