Hot answers tagged

23

Your best bet would likely be to go to Brazil and join a church ceremony. Ayahuasca is legal there for religious use, and there are several well-established churches that use it regularly with a track record of not killing their members, most notably Santo Daime and União do Vegetal. Church ceremonies (and the effects of ayahuasca) can last up to 12 hours, ...


12

I was back-packing in Latin America for 20 months and took my camera everywhere. But it was only a 400 dollar point and shot which fits in my trouser pocket. I used that camera everywhere maybe except inside the favelas in Brazil. Some friends of mine had bigger SLRs with them and used them a lot too. In Bolivia I met a guy who was there for National ...


12

I'm a dual Peruvian-American citizen having taken my American friends to Peru I can attest that, while controversial, that the cheaper fares are meant to encourage Peruvian citizens who may not otherwise be able to afford air travel on their modest incomes. This is along the lines of Florida resident discounts at Disney World etc. So to answer your ...


11

No, quite the opposite. It is always the passenger’s sole responsibility to make sure they have all the right documents (passport, visa, etc. with appropriate validities and so on). Airlines do not check those documents before boarding for the passenger’s convenience, but because the destination country require them to do so, directly or indirectly: if the ...


10

That's entirely possible. Firstly, there are no trains. Seriously. Don't bother trying to find them. In Argentina there's one from Buenos Aires to Rosario, but the bus is cheaper AND faster. There are some tourist trains in North Argentina (near Salta) and yes, there is the train from Cusco in Peru to Aguas Calientes, but that's about it. I'll discuss ...


10

Bus ride from Lima to Cuzco is 20 to 21 hours depending on the company, costing from $65 for one-way ticket. And it's also mainly less-than-safe mountain road. Flight from Lima to Cuzco is 1h10m to 1h25m and you can get ticket as cheap as $175 for round-trip.


10

As someone who's done it, I like the bus. Of course, there are pros and cons of each. Bus Pros: A bus is cheaper, you get to see more of the countryside, interact with more people. You get breaks, get good seats (they have business class buses!), and you can stop off at places on the way. We stopped in Arequipa to go to the Colca Canyon, and in Nazca for ...


10

I just called the 3 taxi companies that work with the airport and the cost is around 60 soles (23 dollar), which i think is a fair price because it's a service of the airport and it's safe. You could take the taxi outside and the cost would be 40 soles or maybe less but i can't say anything about safety. Price details: 1 - 3 person (Car) 60 soles 4 - 6 ...


10

Update: Good news, when you load the official page, you'll now see that they accept VISA payments. As a result, you can now buy advance tickets from outside of Peru directly with the website. However, there are still many other ways to do this. I'd recommend this guide for sources on how to do it. There are numerous online tour agencies that you can pay ...


10

It's actually pretty common to sleep at Cusco your first night. My brother, for example, flew from Lima to Cusco. It's not ideal and you're likely to have a headache, but it's uncommon for anything too serious. You definitely want a full day (two nights) based in Aguas Calientes if you want the full experience. The reason being if you want to be on the ...


9

I was initially sceptical that this was a common problem as I didn't encounter it the two times I went there. Then I did some research and you're definitely not alone. There are a few blogs on this matter that have tried to give their thoughts on the subject. Counterfeit coinage in Peru - looking at the 1 sole coins. Counterfeit money in Peru - how some ...


9

It is a near-guarantee that you will eat several doses of lomo saltado while traveling in Peru. The dish features sauteed sirloin, some stir-fried vegetables, white rice, and lightly fried potatoes. The dish is ubiquitous in Peru, usually well-prepared, and quite cheap. You should be able to feast on some lomo saltado wherever your travels take you in ...


9

Shortest flight is direct one, operated by KLM. It's 12 hours. And it isn't cheap, standard price currently stands around 1300€ for return ticket (AMS->LIM->AMS), and if you're very specific on dates it might be even more. Alternatives with one stop over: Delta (via Atlanta), Air Europa (via Madrid). It's might be slightly cheaper (1000€-1200€), but ...


9

The answer depends on (at least) two things. Whether you want to do the 'proper' Inca trail or one of the alternatives and what time of the year you are going. If you want to do the proper trail in high season you should book in advanced. Sometimes it is fully booked for 3 months. I was there in October (not high season) and I stayed in Cusco for two weeks ...


8

When leaving Lima If you are flying out of Lima internationally, the airport tax is US$31, US$7.40 for domestic flights. As of January 2011 this tax has been rolled into the purchase price of the tickets at this airport. Ensure you receive a sticker on the back of each ticket from the check-in counter to attest to this at the security checkpoint.


8

Although the official currency of Peru is sol, US dollars are widely accepted in many places. I found out three ways to exchange dollars into soles: In banks - the banks have the worst exchange rates and there were always lines. Besides, not all commercial bank exchange money. I don't recommend this. From street moneychangers - there are people in most ...


8

I did this two and a half years ago, and took a 75L pack and a day pack. My friend also had one, and the six others in our group also had backpacks plus odds and ends. There was no problem. However, the train was also only half full (October). I imagine the rules are there so that in the peak season, if it's busy they can then start enforcing them. So ...


8

Easy. For starters, there's a bus (don't take it) from Venuezuela via Lima and Santiago to Buenos Aires that I was told about while there, takes a week. But gives you an idea of the max time you might spend on buses, given you're doing a bit of tracking around. Lima to Arequipa and then Cusco can be done in 1-4 days depending on what stops you want to do. ...


8

Yes it is possible. But you are not going to like it. There is a bus connection from Sao Paulo, Brazil to Santiago Chile, going through Paraguay and Argentina, which does not enter Bolivia. Once there you can take a bus from Santiago, Chile to Bogota Columbia, passing through Peru and Equador. These trips take approximately 2.5 days and 4 days ...


8

The general consensus on this site is that it's probably in your favor to pay in local currency and allow your card issuer to do the conversion, rather than allow the local vendor or their payment network to do it for you - their only relationship with you is for this single transaction, whereas your card has some incentive to give you a more favorable rate ...


7

A lot of such chargers will work with a wide array of voltages and frequencies. It's not uncommon for chargers to be specified as 100-240 VAC 50-60 Hz, which will work essentially anywhere in the world (where there is a public power grid) with simply a physical adapter for the plug. @MeNoTalk is right that in the case of a cell phone charger it probably ...


7

I also read a lot of blog posts and heard stories about bus travel in Peru being dangerous. However, all the ones I was on were pretty good. I travelled in semi-cama and full-cama class, with a variety of companies. No problems with any, and most were pretty good at being on time, unlike a couple I had in Argentina. I travelled at night from Cusco to ...


7

Some of the companies tend to advertise wifi connection onboard, but we encountered the first actually working one in Chile. I would try to go through the desks of different bus companies in the bus station. If they say that they offer wifi in the bus then give them little bit hard time with questions about it and finally go with the one who sounds most ...


7

The 1 USD is not a fee, it's a fine you have to pay when overstaying your visa. There does not seem to be a possibility to extend the visa, once you are in Peru, but if you have the chance to leave Peru somewhere for a day and come back, you might be able to stay longer - specially as a tourist. If you are a resident citizen of the Netherlands, you should ...


7

Never seen a problem with this. I did it once with a large 80L backpack plus one camera bag weighing considerably more than 8kg and once with a rolling 26" suitcase plus an even larger camera bag. No problem in either case. Keep in mind that this is not an official rule but checks tend to be loose on trains compared to airplanes.


7

How to take a boat from Iquitos to Santa Rosa/Laticia/Tabatinga Where to get up-to-date information iPeru provides information. In Iquitos, their office is at the location marked with (i) near the main square (Plaza de Armas). They can explain the boat companies and where to take the boats (boat to Manaus as well). L-S means Lunes/Monday - Sabado/Saturday ...


6

I spent 3 weeks in Peru last year, mostly in Lima, Cusco and the Sacred Valley, and Colca Canyon and Arequipa. Among our fancier possessions, I had a Canon camera with me and my husband had an Asus laptop. We're not physically intimidating people by any means (I'm just 5'2"), but I think we also carry ourselves confidently when we travel (e.g. no looking at ...


6

It depends on the location in Peru, but from my trip there: at the airport, there are official money exchange spots at the border - there are official, 'official', and very unofficial ('dodgy') money changers. Each with different rates, each with different levels of risk. Licensed money changers are your best bet, although potentially a lower rate, at ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible