50

To deal with your various questions: Yes you can bring your car into Amish country. While the area is home to many Amish families it is not run along Amish lines. There are roads and shops and all the usual things you would find. If you have actual business on an Amish farm then they are OK with you driving onto it, just as you would visiting any other ...


31

Based on Florida Drivers License Handbook Signal your intent to merge onto the expressway In this case, you'd switch between signals when merging - So right signal when exiting until the stop sign, then left signal while merging. Pennsylvania DOT agrees, but without pictures -


20

From Pennsylvania Driver's Manual When there is a STEADY RED LIGHT, you must stop before crossing the marked stop line or crosswalk. If you do not see any lines, stop before entering the intersection. Wait for a green light before you start. You may turn right while the light is red, unless a NO TURN ON RED sign is posted at the intersection. You ...


19

There is a stop sign at this intersection. Your right hand signal would be appropriate while stopped at the sign, to signal your intent to cars behind you. As soon as you've decided to proceed, you should switch to left signal to indicate your intention to oncoming traffic in the lane you're merging to.


18

I actually listened to a podcast on the Amish a couple of weeks ago, based on this article on Howstuffworks. I'd recommend it for some solid background. They're not idiots - they do have education, and they know fully what a camera is, but choose not to use them. They generally would prefer you not to take photos - as DJClayworth said, imagine tourists ...


16

The Pennsylvania Driver's Manual currently says you can turn right on red after stopping. (This is actually true in almost all of the United States, with the notable exception of New York City.) A STEADY RED ARROW means you must stop and may not turn in the direction the arrow points. Wait for a Green Arrow or a Flashing Yellow Arrow before you start. The ...


14

You're not dealing with idiots or religious fanatics. Them not participating in modern conveniences doesn't mean that they don't know what those are. There are sites like: Lancaster PA PA Dutch Country and various reviews and posts on Trip Advisor that will help you to plan your trip. And just for kicks Amish are not a uniform group, so there are ...


12

Having grown up in a similar conservative Anabaptist community and now living near a large Amish community, here is my $0.02. Rental car--absolutely! As other answers point out, members of Amish communities own their homes/farms but not the roads. Of course, be aware of the alternative transportation modes you will see, and slow down for buggies, scooters, ...


12

This is the oakland zoo, just go. He was fishing for a DUI nothing more. You would use your right turn signal at the stop sign. Even though it's your only option. If there were an actual merge lane you would use your left signal to indicate a right lane to left lane merge, but there isn't. I was born and raised here in the Steelcity and work in Oakland.


11

In this particular case you should be using the RIGHT TURN Signal You use the left turn signal only in the case where you merge or change from an acceleration lane such as the situation here: In your particular case you where actually making a shallow right turn. There are no actual rules printed as far as I can remember but you can check the driver's ...


10

Yes, unless another sign forbids it. The sign is there to let you know there will be a turn arrow exclusively for you. It does not disallow right on red. If there is not a sign that says "No turn on red" or "No turns," you may turn right on red.


9

The other answers here are good, but don't fully address the photography question with the attention I believe it deserves. Many (perhaps most) Amish do actually have a religious prohibition against photography, and thus will likely be actually more offended by the taking of photographs than the average person being treated as a tourist spectacle. This ...


7

Sure, you can pay with your phone, for some things. But not very many things. Paying by phone is still not very common in the USA. Even in San Francisco, where Square is probably most popular, it's nowhere near common enough that you can get through a trip with it. Even at places that accept Square, usage is so low that employees aren't sure what you're ...


6

There is currently little consumer demand in the U.S. for NFC payments, for a number of reasons: Magnetic card swipe readers are ubiquitous; in D.C., I can use them not only at gas station pumps and for Metro tickets, but in vending machines and parking meters, and even in almost every mom-and-pop shop. There is a standards battle underway between Google ...


6

Plot it with tolls. Plot it without tolls. "Lay them on top of each other" in your mind. Those lines are going to cross or come quite near, at some point(s). Use one to crossover. See, most of your time penalty is pinballing around Ohio-2 and US-422 in Ohio. It's all-freeway on the Pennsylvania side. They don't kiss, but they come close in ...


4

Nothing My grandparents lived in Amish country a fair stretch outside Harrisburg when I was young. Except for Hershey, PA, all the activities within a long distance were on the very marginal side of interesting. "Farms for kids" and all don't really excite most kids, one petting zoo is about as much as anyone wants. You're going to have to balance them ...


4

Not really. It's still a functioning power plant, and as such there are safety concerns with letting people explore a place. There is a Three Miles Island Visitors Center, which has exhibits and video displays. The company which operates the plant, Exelon, has their Three Miles page online as well. A journalist for Bloomberg was taken on a tour, however,...


3

According to one of the sources for that article, it was closed in 1835. Later it was razed, and a library now stands on the site.


3

There are a few things to do: A brief tour through an Amish village and an Amish farm house A hands-on museum for children A farm with a lot of activities targeted towards children and families, and another similar farm An amusement park for children Buggy rides and more buggy rides An outdoor park in the mountains


3

This is an old post, but I often am in this situation travelling between Scott (Carnegie), a few miles southwest of Pittsburgh and Ashland in north central Ohio. Westbound, we take I-79 to the PA turnpike (free westbound, avoids I-376 tolls on airport expressway) to Niles where 76 leaves the Ohio Turnpike. The OH TPK portion is $1. Not unreasonable. ...


2

From the PA E-ZPass site What is a Violation? WHAT IS A VIOLATION? Vehicle exits through an E-ZPass lane without a valid E-ZPass transponder. Vehicle exits through an E-ZPass lane AND the license plate of the vehicle is not listed on an existing E-ZPass account. Vehicle exits through an E-ZPass lane AND there are insufficient funds ...


2

What other method would it be? Bus? Train? Plane? I think driving would be the best way to do it, and it looks to be a nice drive once you get out of the more dense NY/NJ areas.


2

I agree with the proposed route from @Harper, but instead of going all the way out to Grove City, exit I-80 at Hermitage, take I-376 south to New Castle, it will turn into US-422 (limited access) and follow that to I-79. You will find this a slightly more enjoyable trip, much less trafficked than I-80, with the opportunity to stop and refuel/eat in New ...


2

One "gotcha" with some intersections that have a separate right turn signal is that the light may cycle green, yellow, red along with the main intersection and then quickly turn green again if/when the cross traffic from the right gets a green arrow. No matter how short the red interval, such a light must be treated very differently from one which simply ...


1

According the Pennsylvania Driver's Manual, you can actually turn right on a red arrow. Here's what the manual says: A STEADY RED ARROW means you must stop and may not turn in the direction the arrow points. Wait for a Green Arrow or a Flashing Yellow Arrow before you start. The same turns-on-red that are allowed for a steady red signal are allowed for a ...


1

I would not plan on using your smartphone as a method of payment in the US. You will find some places in large cities that accept such forms of payment, but it is not very common.


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