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95

Part of the host's contract with booking.com is that booking.com will take a commission fee of 10-25% out of each booking made through them. So if you cancel your booking.com reservation and pay the host directly, the host will get the full amount of your payment, instead of just 75-90% of it, and booking.com gets cut out of the deal. The discount they're ...


90

Just looking at the domain name: homeaway-eu.com - registered in 2018 registrar: NAMECHEAP INC registered by: information hidden email account hosted by: privateemail.com (which is a product of NameCheap domain registrar, essentially it's a 1 minute job to create an email account there) Whereas: homeaway.com - registered in 1998 registrar: MarkMonitor, ...


64

This is a scam. There are several red flags. With one of them, I'd be highly suspicious. With the trifecta, it's definitely a scam. Using a slightly different domain name which is one of many possible variations on the company's main domain name. Sometimes it's the same name with a different toplevel name (e.g. company.com and company.eu), but those are ...


47

This situation has a couple strong parallels to common housing scams. Rental scam #1 – the cloned listing This is one of the most popular Craigslist rental scams, perhaps because it’s so cheap to execute. The scammer copies and pastes information from a legitimate rental ad, and then offers a price that’s literally “too good to be true.” If ...


33

TL;DR Keep your original booking. It's possible that the host found out that the demand on accommodation for the period of your booking went up, so they will have no trouble renting the place for more money to someone else if you cancel. Or maybe they are already overbooked and are looking for the least expensive way out. The thing you have to understand ...


15

A folio is a list of your charges. For example, phone calls, minibar, laundry services, room service, valet, etc. anything that is billed to your room. Hotels maintain separate folios, typical ones are: Guest Staff Master (assigned for group accounts; for example a tour group consisting of multiple guests) Non-guest (assigned for other services; for ...


14

Credit and debit cards are ubiquitous in Scandinavia. You should have no trouble using a Visa card. Before you travel, you could apply for a credit card that has zero foreign transactions fee. You can also take out money from an ATM, like almost anywhere else in the world. Some banks' ATM cards refund ATM fees. Purchases in a foreign currency are no ...


13

But once I open my account it shows the application is complete and the payment is already done. There is no link for payment and the amount is also not credited to my account. Ignore the second email saying your payment was rejected, attend your appointment and they will know exactly what's the status. If for some reason the payment did not go through they ...


11

Yes, your account can be closed if you accept cash. Here's what Airbnb has published on this issue: Offline or cash payments are a violation of our Terms of Service, and can result in removal from Airbnb. We prohibit off-site payments because paying outside of Airbnb makes it harder for us to protect your information and puts you at a greater risk ...


11

Road tolling is not standardized in the U.S., and even within the same state there can be multiple tolling authorities, systems, and policies. Therefore, the answer depends on the system. Some authorities have a "pay by plate" system, in which a photo or video is taken of your license plate and an invoice sent to the address where the car is registered. As ...


10

Regarding Hostelworld their business model is not around getting payments for the hostels. They aren't a payment gateway. They are basically an hostel directory, with some sugar on it (they also collect user reviews and have a booking management system for the hostels). The value that you pay for reservation is actually earned by these websites as commission....


10

There are two options. The easy way is cash, which is (at time of writing) still accepted by every toll plaza on every Japanese expressway: just collect a chit on entry and pay when you leave. But if you're driving longer distances or on multiple days, you'll want to look into getting set up for ETC (electronic toll collection, but called "ETC" even in ...


10

If I don't unsubscribe, will my membership automatically renew? According to Wizzair's official Twitter, you have to renew it manually: Will "unsubscribing" from the Wizz Air Discount Club cancel the remainder of my subscription? Their updated website no longer has the option to unsubscribe from Discount Club membership, so the question is moot.


10

Answering Question B, to transact safely, use a platform with an escrow system. A reversible payment (credit card, PayPal), especially from someone in another country, brings the merchant a nontrivial fraud risk. A non-reversible payment (Western Union, MoneyGram) exposes the consumer to a parallel risk. This is why you hear time and time again to not ...


10

Yes, and you do not necessarily need a Chinese bank account. You have a few options: (1) you could add money into your Alipay account using mobile phone refill cards. These refill cards are purchasable at any convenience store or supermarket. (2) you can get your identity verified with a non-Chinese passport, although it will take 24 hours (it's instant ...


10

Daily transaction limits are put in place by your card issuer to protect against fraud and credit default. Depending on your credit status, if you call your card provider you should be able to get the limit increased either permanently or as a one-off. https://www08.wellsfargomedia.com/assets/pdf/personal/debit-card/terms-and-conditions.pdf


8

In bigger cities like São Paulo or touristic places like Foz do Iguaçu or Ouro Preto cards are accepted virtually everywhere - even in food stands on the street (I even saw once people selling brownies with marijuana and accepting credit cards). I've also never seen any minimum amount limit for card payments and it's normal to pay with a card even for ...


8

Sweden is amongst the most cashless countries in the world, but cash is still widely accepted to the degree that coffee-shops or city-buses not excepting cash are exceptions. Very few shops don't accept visa and master card; and most places have touch-less cart-terminals as well as chip and magnet card-readers. Yet, many Swedes, like me, never use cash, ...


8

Asking for a copy of a passport is quite common. Whether it's legally required I can't answer, but the more problematic part is asking for the cleaning charge in cash. This is against Airbnb's terms. If a host asks you for more money than what you paid on the site and the extra charge wasn’t stated in the listing or in the message thread, you can dispute ...


8

A local bank account and debit card would serve you very well. In Ontario cash is almost unnecessary because so many places take debit. We can also email each other money using Interac, which is part of the debit system. Most people I know email the rent to their landlord, for example. Everything I used to write cheques for (paying my farmer for veggies, ...


7

It sounds fishy to me too. Not as fishy as Western Union or MoneyGram, because I could just guarantee those are scams. For a transaction done on a site that doesn't offer assurances of their own (so this wouldn't apply to AirBnB) I don't think I would do anything other than a credit card, which I could reverse-charge for fraud. Hard as it is to believe, ...


7

Airline regulations are likely to be a problem here. As a general rule, they don't allow this. Your customer is unlikely to get flagged, but if he is flagged, he'll at the very least have to re-buy the same ticket with his own card, and at worst may not be able to board. You say that you are new to the services, so you're not really experienced with how ...


6

By far the best way to pay is by credit card usually. I would highly recommend you look into the current credit cards you own. If you own the Discover IT card for example, they offer 0% foreign transaction fees. If stores that you will be shopping at accept this card, you are golden in that area. In Poland for instance, the Discover IT card is accepted. But,...


6

You likely can use your Visa debit card in foreign countries, but you should call your bank (or use their website) to notify them that you will be using it in other countries. Otherwise they may automatically block it. You can also use an Indian ATM card in Indonesia, if it supports a compatible network (look at the card for icons on the back like "Plus" ...


6

I visited Sweden from the UK three weeks ago. Every shop I went into, even the tiny little cafes and the otherwise fairly haphazard outdoor ice rink, were perfectly happy to accept both my UK VISA debit and my Mastercard credit card. There are indeed some places that do not accept cash but most still do: those that don't have fairly prominent signs (...


6

Visa and Mastercard works fine, chip is preferred Visa and Mastercard works pretty much everywhere. Chipped card is the preferred way to go. Swiping is no longer in use at all. About a quarter of all machines have enabled RFID (estimate from personal experience). ATMs will give you Swedish currency from your Visa and Mastercard if you need it, but ...


6

Is this something common? Or should I skip and look somewhere else? Bank transfer is the normal way of transferring money in the Netherlands. If there are any red flags in this situation, that is not among them.


6

As was suggested above, you should consider getting a credit card that does not have a surcharge for foreign transactions. Generally speaking, you should have no trouble using your cards in Sweden and Denmark. There are only two things you should be aware of. One is that debit networks are not 100% interoperable with U.S. networks. So your debit card might ...


6

The person who has contacted you as "the host" may not be who they say they are. They could be a junior employee who is able to slip you the key to an unbooked room, while pocketing your reservation fee. They could even be a scammer totally unconnected to the accommodation who has found out you are staying there (maybe from your social media posts, or maybe ...


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