114

If you are a refugee, as defined by the UN convention, then no, you can't return to your home country without losing your refugee status. After all, the fact that you dare to return means that 1) the situation in your country has improved so giving you refugee status isn't necessary anymore, or 2) you lied to authorities in the first place to get refugee ...


111

You were given refugee status because you convinced them that you couldn't go back to Iraq. So yes, if they know you went back you will likely lose your status. As for how to cheat the government and still go, I'm not sure you'll find someone here who can give you advice on that. Most people in this site are not into cheating; and even if you got concrete ...


104

No, the Customs cannot make you go back, and return the equipment. What the Customs can do is one of the following: Let you in with the item, optionally after duty is paid, if required. If you don't have enough money, Customs typically will hold the item until duty is paid, but they will not detain you. Hold the item temporarily (for example, to analyze ...


87

Call the Border Force (phone numbers to each Heathrow terminal at the bottom here) and explain the situation in perfect detail, including that the school won't enrol her without the proper entry stamp. If they aren't helpful, ask for a chief officer. You should be told what to do. Please let us know what happens by writing an answer of your own


81

It's worth pointing out the guidelines the USA itself applies to U.S. passport holders: (My emphasis) 7 FAM 1330 APPENDIX D  BIRTH OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES - CURRENT SOVEREIGNTY RULE (CT:CON-254;   04-29-2008) a. It is the Department of State policy that place of birth in a U.S. passport should reflect the current sovereignty as determined by the Office of ...


80

Check-in staff go by Timatic, which is based on information provided to IATA by local immigration authorities. They won't change their mind even if you call an embassy in front of them. Unfortunately there is a misunderstanding on your part: it is not the 3-month passport validity requirement in and of itself that was new, but the 15-day visa exemption ...


78

To recap, with thanks to many commenters, there are a number of suspicious factors in this question: Nigeria - a country well known for scams of this type. Not that there aren't many legitimate people and businesses in Nigeria, but it's a factor. Customs does not detain people for days because of unpaid duty. Someone would only be held for days if they were ...


74

Denmark has never issued ID cards of the kind that some other EU member states do. This is why a passport is the only option for Danes traveling within the EU. If Denmark chose to start issuing such ID cards, they would be valid for travel to other EU member states too. What is new(ish) is that citizens used to be able to travel between the Nordic ...


72

Take that warning seriously, it is in their records (and in your interest). But the immigration officer felt that I should be travelling on an L1 instead of a B1 since I am staying for longer duration in the US. That's then the best advice for you, unfortunately we won't be able to better that one. After having assessed your travels and having ...


71

I don't want to worry or scare you, but— no, actually I do. I need to. You must be open-minded and clear about this, because the situation is incredibly suspicious. Let's sum up what we know so far: Your fiancé went to Nigeria Your fiancé came back "early" to "surprise" you Your fiancé ended up at a non-existent Customs office, and claims to be ...


61

My wife has arrived now and passed immigration successfully, so I can answer the question based on this one experience, although it won't necessarily be the same for everyone. The direct answer - the green card wasn't needed in the end. She had a scanned version of the green card - the immigration officer said they don't accept scanned versions and didn't ...


58

It is most probably a simple double-check in order to confirm you're the actual person that the passport represents. Most probably this is prompted by your recent looks being very different from your picture in your passport. Yes a passport (with a valid authorization) is sufficient to consider your application for entry, but before that the officer needs ...


57

Let's reiterate: You had a problem with your current passport People were not accepting (or at least easily) other means of identification It seems you were just let go on that occasion because people had "better things to do". Even if by all laws your current passport (or other documents provided) should work, you already know that this didn't much ...


56

The 'Seaman's Book' provides a travel document that can be used instead of a passport in some cases. In order to be used as a passport, the situation must be appropriate (i.e., joining or leaving a vessel) and the book itself must contain all of the information that a passport would normally contain. But the big selling point of having a Seaman's Book, ...


54

First off I believe you are being scammed. Being Ghanaian and American, having had extensive interactions with the American Embassy in Accra, and having lived in Ghana for decades, I have some knowledge on how these scam artists operate and it smells like a fish and stinks to the high heavens once money is being demanded from you either subtly or directly. ...


52

Algeria. A look at the (electronic) form DS-160 tells you this:


52

According to CBP it is very important for her to have her green card. Lawful Permanent Residents (LPR) of the U.S. must present a Permanent Resident Card ("Green Card", Form I-551), a Reentry Permit (if gone for more than 1 year), or a Returning Resident Visa (if gone for 2 years or more) to reenter the United States. Since you're saying she has already ...


51

TL;DR: You will need a visa You must use a British passport in order to travel visa-free, which takes 6 weeks to issue, with no expedited service being available for first-time adult applicants. So your only hope is getting an appointment at the US embassy as soon as possible and obtaining a B1 visa. Also, do not, absolutely do NOT, tell US officials you'...


47

British Airways had nothing to do with this; it was Aviapartner staff that denied you boarding. Your son cannot use his residence permit to transit the UK (only the common EU-format permit card or the family member card - which looks like the Belgian national ID card - is accepted), but the US visa would've worked. Unfortunately, it would appear there is a ...


47

No. Excepting some special circumstances that don't apply here like official military travel, a passport is required by the US. Brazil similarly requires a passport. Any airline will simply deny boarding if you show up with only a birth certificate. For instance, if you go to Timatic and tell it that a US citizen wants to go to Brazil with only a birth ...


46

You need to call the CBP immediately at +1 202 325 8000, ask for a supervisor (tell them it's a complicated and serious matter and that you must be 100% sure to receive the right answer). Tell them your passport number and last admission number (can be looked up here), and tell them exactly what the officers in New York told you. Ask them to check their ...


45

Since you're in transit, just write "in transit" for the address, and show your connecting flight's ticket if asked. For what it's worth, this is a common scenario that immigration officers will have seen before, because the US does not recognize the idea of sterile transit: every traveller has to pass through Customs & Immigration, even if they are ...


44

An acquaintance did the same and got his refugee status revoked when he was found out. In his case the country of origin was Afghanistan and the host country was Britain. I reckon the same rules apply in Germany as well.


44

You are not eligible and need to apply for a visa. As the document you quote states, people who have traveled to North Korea after March 1, 2011 (with exceptions that presumably do not apply in your case) are no longer eligible to be admitted under the Visa Waiver Program. This is the case whether or not your ESTA is valid; you're seeking to be admitted ...


42

You don't need a return ticket, but with you having a boyfriend there, I'd strongly recommend you to get one. If nothing else, a random fully-refundable ticket for a date around the time you suspect you'll return. Also, if staying longer than a month, bring every single piece of documentation proving your ties to the US (signed/stamped employment/school ...


41

Is it legal for a third party in general to stamp my passport? Your passport won't be stamped. Only the print out of your boarding pass, with a stamp that says "VISA VERIFIED" and a signature. Here's an example: Is this a one-time document check only? No, unfortunately you will have to go through the same procedure every time you fly. Just why Ryanair ...


40

You have a bigger problem than "will Ryanair let me fly" but rather "will I be admitted to the UK". To be admitted to the UK, you must usually have a passport, or an EEA national identity card. You don't have either, which makes admission difficult. You would only be admitted if you can convince the Border Officer of your EU citizenship. If you aren't ...


40

Because your wife is an Irish citizen, you are the spouse of an EU citizen. You will therefore continue to have rights under the free movement directive even after most citizens of the UK cease having those rights. In particular, as long as you travel with your wife (or to join her), you are a beneficiary of the directive. So in fact, very little will ...


38

According to the help file from the Canadian government for filling out the ETA it says the following on the application: Given name(s) / first name(s) Please enter exactly as shown on your passport or identity document Source: https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/ircc/migration/ircc/english/pdf/eta/english.pdf (Page 11) So you should put it in, exactly ...


37

Very simple: From the US State Department Website last sentence. A federal or state law enforcement agency may request the denial of a passport on several regulatory grounds under 22 CFR 51.70 and 51.72. The principal law enforcement reasons for passport denial are a federal warrant of arrest, a federal or state criminal court order, a condition of ...


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