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77

It's hard to understand why this can be the case without some background in how airline fares work, so lets start with a bit of background... For each route, airlines will publish a number of different fares, each with a distinct "fare code" - normally with weird names like "TANRKL", "YSJWNN" or "X34Q". Corresponding to these fare codes are "fare rules" ...


44

The US CBP (Customs and Border Protection) is uninterested in how you purchase your flights from the airline. Their only concern is that you leave the US on or before the date your stay expires. There should be absolutely no problem with your plan. The only problem that could arise is if your approval to stay is for some reason much shorter than the normal ...


32

You can do that. since one-way tickets are (almost) always more expensive. Booking a flexible return ticket will also be more expensive than the single ticket version, but you should look into it, since it should be cheaper than the double-return tickets in most cases. But you better make sure that you know where and how to buy a ticket in Hong Kong and how ...


30

I actually did exactly what you described twice (didn't return on my original ticket) and have entered and left the US without any issue subsequently. No one questioned me about this when I left and it wasn't raised when I entered. The stamps said I had leave to remain for 90 days and on both occasions I left within this period. I only add this answer ...


26

You cannot do this. If you miss the first leg of your ticket, the airline will cancel all the rest of your flights. You'd turn up in Munich and find that your reservation to Tokyo has been cancelled. Munich is well designed for short connections, and you won't have to pass through immigration, so an hour isn't particularly unreasonable, provided that your ...


23

There are a couple of very different cases here: Cost Especially on longer (non-regional) international flights, a round-trip ticket usually still costs substantially less than two one-way tickets (except award tickets purchased with points/miles.) I have encountered many instances where a one-way ticket was actually more expensive than the entire round-...


20

It used to be advantageous to buy round-trip tickets, and of course it's less work to do so since you only have to pay for the ticket once. For some travel, such as overseas travel, on some airlines it's still cheaper to do a return flight or an open-jaw flight (e.g. Toronto-London, Paris-Toronto) instead of buying each leg on a separate ticket. One ...


18

Flying one-way with many of the major carriers is normally far more expensive than half of a return due to the way airlines price flights. That leaves you with three options : Find a major airline that doesn't bump prices for one-way (as much). SAS is one that springs to mind, and their one-way flights are normally cheaper than other major airlines. Also ...


18

First off, no it is not safe to discard the first leg. If you buy a return (or any multi leg) ticket, missing the first flight on it (or any interim flights if there are more than one) will void the remaining flight(s) on the ticket. As for why the one-way ticket is more expensive, that has already been answered in detail here: One-way versus return airfare ...


18

Large car hire companies offer this… but do not describe it exactly in the way you do. Specifically, you can always call them to extend the contract, add new options, etc. In effect, the return date and address are mostly used to calculate the price. I am regularly using Avis and their FAQ explicitly mentions all this. If you exceed some maximum rental ...


15

One major concern is that some airlines don't like it when you drop tickets (legs or entire flights) because it's cheaper for you. As a result, not turning up can be held against you and any frequent flyer program that you might hold with them. I don't know of anyone personally that's had theirs cancelled or penalised, but have seen it mentioned ...


14

Yes. You can and often should do that. In some instances, you are actually legally required to have a return flight (for immigration) even if you plan to travel to a 3rd country. Of course, this depends on the country and your citizenship/visas &c. If you have an A to B return ticket and you have now arrived at B and do not plan to use the return to A, ...


14

Arriving in a country for a "visit" without a return (or ongoing) ticket usually raises the suspicion of the immigration officers. They may think that you are not actually intending to leave. The airlines are responsible for your return transport if you are refused entry into a country, so the airline has interest in avoiding you getting refused entry at the ...


14

This is a bit of an old question, but as an industry insider, I thought it was worth answering, because the real reason that one-way rentals don't exist between Alaska and the Lower 48 hasn't been touched on by anyone else. My experience: I managed one of the major rental companies in Anchorage for the better part of a decade. Why is it not possible to ...


13

It is not possible to book both tickets with different routes "together". However by law all US airlines must allow you to either cancel a ticket up to 24 hours after purchase for a full refund, OR hold a ticket for up to 24 hours before purchasing it. (Most airlines do the former, but they are allowed do one or the other). Thus your best option will be to ...


12

Technically speaking, almost all airlines can serve you well without any tickets or PNRs (passenger number record or booking reference) as long as you have bought the ticket and made reservation regardless of the method of buying. All they need is your name and a valid ID (passport in international flights) and they can get you the boarding pass. Even the ...


12

When entering the Schengen area as a non-EEA citizen, you do not need proof of onward travel, but proof of "means of subsistence ... for the return to your country of origin or transit to a third country into which you are certain to be admitted" (Schengen Borders Code, Article 5). An onward or return ticket would of course also fulfill this requirement, but ...


12

Leaving aside the question of round trip versus one-way fares, there are some potential disadvantages to booking your outbound and return flights on separate one-way tickets as opposed to a single round-trip (aka return) ticket— unless all tickets happen to be fully flexible, fully refundable, full-fare tickets, which you won't be buying if you care at all ...


12

The guy on Twitter has misread Timatic, the database which airlines use to verify passenger documents. The NOTE 60190 appears in the USA transit section, and means that she needs an onward ticket departing the USA. Visa required, except for Nationals of Japan with a biometric passport (with an electronic chip symbol on the cover) and an Electronic ...


11

The answer is going to depend on your exact itinerary, but my sneaky suspicion is that hubbing out of Kuala Lumpur and flying Air Asia everywhere would be the cheapest way to do it. Not only is Air Asia cheap and ubiquitous, but the passenger taxes & charges at KUL are noticeably lower than in SIN. That said, Kuala Lumpur's LCC terminal is a bit of a ...


11

There's generally only one major disadvantage to booking two one-way tickets in situations like this - Change/Cancellation fees! If for some reason you have to cancel your trip, instead of paying a single cancellation fee you'll have to pay two - one to each airline - and odds are that each fee will be the same as the single fee would have been so in effect ...


10

By it's very name, an "Electronic Ticket", or an "E-ticket" is not a physical item - it's just an entry in a computer system. As a result, you do not need to physically present any specific document at time of check-in in order to get your boarding pass. So technically, no, you do not need to print anything out at all. However there are a few places where ...


10

Throwaway ticketing is against the rules, but it is rarely worth the airline's effort to pursue occasional violators. The sanctions, for the most part, are to withhold services or benefits. I've never heard of anyone being criminally charged in any country for skipping their last segment. The airline has priced the round trip ticket below the one-way ...


10

Assuming that the stamp you got when you entered allows you to stay until November 9 (which it ought to, barring special circumstances): When you board your one-way flight home, the airline will transmit your passport number to the US authorities, who will then know you have left the country. It doesn't matter to them that you had a ticket for a different ...


10

Can I return to the UK? ... I am a British Citizen Yes. Having right of abode means you’re allowed to live or work in the UK without any immigration restrictions, which means: you won’t need a visa to come to the UK there’s no limit on the length of time you can spend in the country All British citizens automatically have right of abode in ...


10

This is one way: This is return: Of course you need to add the other leg to it but that's <$400 and so you are still looking at a ~$600 ticket vs a $1984 ticket. In general, this doesn't happen on routes where low cost competition exists but on intercontinental travel, it's still very strong.


9

My answer does not reflect official rules and laws, just my own experience. I visited over 80 countries and many of them officially require proof of onward travel, ten of them are in South America. The only time anybody ask me about onward travel was when checking in for a flight to New Zealand in Sydney. In some other cases I had return flights with the ...


9

Timatic (the visa system used by many airlines) specifically states for a US citizen visiting Columbia : Visitors traveling as tourist are required to hold proof of sufficient funds to cover their stay and documents required for their next destination. Warning: - Visitors, traveling as tourist, not holding return/onward tickets could ...


9

No, this will not work. Buying a return ticket and only using the first leg of it will certainly work - just make sure that you don't skip any of the legs before the one(s) you intend to use to avoid the ticket being canceled. However what will not work is trying to book a refundable fare class for the return, and then obtaining a refund for that leg. The ...


9

According to TIMATIC (the Visa processing system use by most airlines/travel agents since 1963) the requirements for an Australia citizen visiting South Korea are : Passport required. Passport and/or passport replacing documents must be valid on arrival. Visa required, except for Those traveling to attend conferences, exhibitions, ...


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