151

Taken from How CBP Handles Traveler Complaints: Complaints concerning allegations of misconduct/discrimination The U.S. Customs and Border Protection takes allegations of employee misconduct and discrimination very seriously. Allegations of misconduct or discrimination are referred to the CBP Office of Internal Affairs. Personnel are specially trained to ...


117

I’m a former Immigration Officer myself (in the UK). Saying “hello” (or “good morning/evening” etc) is entirely appropriate, just like any other encounter in the English-speaking world. It distinguishes us from machines, acknowledging the human interaction. In other words, if you did not greet the officer then you may as well be using one of the automated ...


98

Answer Can I get financial compensation? Can you first quantify in euros how much damage you suffered from detention? If yes, consult a lawyer asking if there is any rule granting you compensation. If no, you can't demand anything. Quantification can be done by any means, like missed connection and suffered costs. Despite any formula, you need a monetary ...


64

I'd say the chance to get any kind of financial compensation is low. There is no compensation provision in Schengen Borders Code, and I doubt there is one in the Italian national law. You can pursue the court case against them, but note that even Article 8 gives the border officials leeway: However, on a non-systematic basis, when carrying out minimum ...


54

These are called unmarked cars - sort of a compromise between a marked car and a fully undercover vehicle. The idea is that they're somewhat less easy to spot than a marked car, yet still have all the same equipment when it's needed. They are very common, though the laws around their use may be evolving. Yes, by law you do need to follow their ...


52

Yes, for every problem with the police, you can insist to do it at the station. (except some pretty much impossible situations where any delay brings harm to people etc., but at the same time checking your ID is more important than helping them ... this won't happen to you) But I wouldn't choose this as first option automatically. Normally trivial things ...


47

My experience at the UK border is the same and I even have had a short questioning when leaving my own country. Something I am definitely allowed to do. At some point this was at a smaller airport where you have to go trough the border control to reach a few extra-Schengen gates. The border guard asked where I was flying. I considered this to be a silly ...


47

Yes, but might be better to call 158. Pretending to be a police officer is a crime (at least in Czechia). If you suspect a crime, you're expected to call the police. Obviously, if you suspect that the guy standing next to you is a fake policeman, your property or health may be in imminent danger, so you're perfectly entitled to call the emergency number. ...


46

I’m surprised nobody has mentioned what I believe to be the more common answer: Once a police department is finished with a car that has become too old, the department often removes its markings and auctions it off. If you don’t see any government markings anywhere (such as the license plate), I’d guess it’s no longer a police car (based on my experience ...


45

First of all, it isn't something unusual to have a super frequent flyer on daily basis. During my years as a cabin crew member I remember a few passengers whom I saw a few times a month in an airline that operates 15,000 flights a months! Second, you are scanned prior to your departure, and that's what really counts. The random checks at arrivals are not ...


39

Yes, they have the power, but: it is all recorded, and somewhat appealable (you may not get in this time, but next time) an agent showing a pattern such as always denying fat people, or people of a certain religion, would risk discipline, there is supervision and management most of them are good decent people who believe they are protecting their country, ...


38

Follow the steps: Remain calm. Ask for identification before going anywhere with them or giving them anything. Don't sign anything without a lawyer present. If they start accusing you of anything, state that you require they then contact your embassy to help you with a lawyer. Generally if they're scamming, they don't want documentation or third parties ...


38

There's no strict rule. If they say hello (good morning / good evening / etc.) when you walk up, say hello back. If they say "Hi, how are you today?" then answer them. If they just say "passport please", just hand over your passport. If they don't say anything, just quietly hand over your passport. I usually say thank you when they hand everything back at ...


36

Saying hello indicates you speak at least some English, which avoids the need for the immigration officer to ask. They may be interested in your accent - if you have a characteristic accent from some part of the country you're visiting, but have not lived in that country, they may be suspicious. The same could apply if you try to speak a little of the local ...


33

There is much less automated exchange of data than what many people assume, so the answer to your question as asked - "do they know" - is probably no. If you however ask: "can they easily find out", you must assume that the answer is yes. In most cases, the airline is obligated to file a flight manifest with passenger data to the relevant aviation ...


31

I think you are out of luck because in my understanding, the officer was right and you were wrong. Well, the officer is always right to begin with, but in this case, he really is. You correctly state that as an EU citizen you have the right to move freely within the territory of the Member States and need nothing but an ID card. Ukraine is not a member ...


29

Following is the official text detailing powers of immigration officers. The key para within this is: (2) to arrest any alien who in his presence or view is entering or attempting to enter the United States in violation of any law or regulation made in pursuance of law regulating the admission, exclusion, expulsion, or removal of aliens, or to ...


28

Report the office to the officer in charge of the nearest customs office and the head of the airport. This behavior is completely not allowed, and he will face discipline, including possibly being fired. His conduct is dishonorable and unprofessional, so let them know how seriously you take it and they will deal with it.


25

Israeli passport holders generally aren't allowed to enter almost any country. Your assumption is false. Most (not all, but most) countries determine who's allowed to enter based on where they have been, not their nationality. So what you need to do is find a country that both a) allows people who have been in Thailand for the past 14 days, and b) will ...


24

The other answers have given good general reasons. I want to add a little bit to your particular case, though. In OP you mention that you asked the border officer to stamp a piece of paper that you had brought for him. You further clarified in a comment: A blank A4 sheet torn in half which I sometimes bring as a souvenir stamp sheet. When approaching ...


24

I personally (nearly) always say hello (just hello) while handing over my passport, even if they don't say anything. I'll often try to use the local version if I know it. Once finished, usually a thank you and/or goodbye. Beyond that, it's up to them. I wouldn't go into any "how are you today" or anything like that unless they initiate it. They see hundreds ...


23

Border Officers are trained to look for anything suspicious, and rightly so. Their job is not to welcome you to the country, but to protect the border. Just because your nationality grants legal right of entry there could be other circumstances that affect your entry; you may be smuggling, your docs may be forged, you may have other nefarious intentions. ...


22

Something to keep in mind here: Foreigners must register where they are staying in China. Normally the hotel does this for you--but note that this means the government computers have everything they need to catch you if they have thus programmed them. Whether they have nor not I do not know. Being caught on the street is a trivial risk compared to this. ...


22

The competent bodies in each EU/Schengen state can be reached at the following e-mail addresses (mostly belonging to national departments, i.e. not a specific airport/crossing): Austria: bmi-ii-2@bmi.gv.at (operations), bmi-v-6@bmi.gv.at (policy unit) Belgium: dao.immi@police.belgium.eu (operations), border@ibz.fgov.be (policy unit) Bulgaria: nsgp@mvr.bg ...


21

Having worked with London police for some time, I can tell you that, no, you cannot. Until a few years ago this was possible with an advance request, however there was an incident whereby the civilian on the ride-along was injured. To make the long story short, the practice was stopped straight away. Moreover, even police student officers (i.e. already ...


20

You could possibly be charged with driving a vehicle without the owners consent, but more importantly if you are not a valid driver then you are driving without insurance. Driving without insurance is illegal in Florida. You should also be aware that the insurance you don't have doesn't just protect you against damaging the car. In the US, if you seriously ...


20

Until you showed the boarding pass the only evidence you had that you were telling the truth about who you were and what you were doing was a single ID card. Against that were a bunch of fairly unlikely coincidences that implied that you might not be who you said you were. Travelling without passport Or any other photo id Left boarding pass on plane ...


18

Unless you're from a country that requires you to obtain an exit visa, there is no sharing of information as a general rule. Even in cases where there are information sharing agreements, such as between the US and Canada, the US and Mexico, or in the Schengen area, the information that is shared is about people from outside the info-sharing nations, but not ...


16

As an Irish citizen, you have the absolute right to enter Ireland. The immigration officer cannot possibly deny you entry, as long as you produce a document that shows you're in fact an Irish citizen - and the passport card clearly shows that. Therefore you have the absolute right to only produce your passport card and refuse to provide any other document. ...


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