56

Immigration's job is making sure visitors to this country don't overstay, don't seek employment without the proper visa, don't rely on social services, don't commit crimes, and aren't being trafficked. He surely wanted to talk to your former employer to avoid a snafu that would cause trouble later, if it turned out you were likely to be returning to her ...


37

If noticed, then yes, this could potentially trigger some extra questioning. However, assuming both countries have good relations with the US (read: are not Sudan or Somalia), it's unlikely they would be denied entry over it. And realistically, given the knowledge of geography evinced by the average US immigration officer, I would be pretty surprised if ...


34

Further to @Hilmar’s answer, and after update from OP confirming duration of stay per i-94 is 90 days, IMHO the answer to the question is ‘yes, you should take this landing interview seriously’. A requirement of US law means they start temporary visitor admission decisions from a presumption of immigrant intent. Although your Norwegian citizenship means you ...


31

There may be perfectly legitimate reasons for such discrepancies. For example a city could belong to country A when a person was born, but later change to country B because of border adjustment or because country A was reformed/renamed/ceased to exist. So the fact that the place of birth in the passport does not lie in the country of birth in the passport is ...


29

First, check your admission stamp or record and verify the date. Just because the officer said "1 month", doesn't mean that they only admitted you for one month. There is a depressingly large number of CBP officers that simply get a kick out of scaring and confusing travelers and just want to see you squirm and grovel. It's entirely possible that you got ...


12

Something that other Answers miss is: talk to the agency and see what exactly they say. As much as we all want to rely on online media, talking to an actual person seems to be the most reliable way to answer your questions right now. Get the number from their website and actually talk to them. Ask them your questions and get answers directly "from the ...


6

First of all, Norwegian passports are relatively cheap. If you are older than 16, the passport fee is NOK 450 (appr 54€) and if you are younger, the fee is NOK 270 (appr 32€). The passport is valid for 10 years if you are older than 16, otherwise it is only issued for 5 years. According to the Chinese Embassy in Oslo, you must provide your original passport ...


6

You could try the Frelsesarmeen Tromsø (Salvation Army), Grønnegata 97, 9259 Tromsø, Tel 77 68 31 82, www.frelsesarmeen.no/tromsoe


5

Well It depends where you will be entering China. If you will pass by Hong Kong or Macau before entering mainland, getting a visa there would be the best option. It took me about an hour the last time i got one issued at the Macau border(through CTS agency - https://www.ctshk.com/english/useful/chinesevisa.htm, which you can find in HK as well). You 'll ...


5

ESTA (Air) You should apply for ESTA before leaving for the USA by air. It is an online application and normally is instant (unless they require further documents and want you to apply for a visa). It last for 2 years, and is multiple entry by air and up to 90 days per entry. ESTA for land travel For land travel it seems you don't need to have ESTA. But I ...


3

To give you a short answer: As a Norwegian, you do need a passport to travel to Germany (irrelevant of age). Even if chances are very high that noone will check either your or your child's passport, foreign citizens need a passport or approved substitute (e.g. national id card from an EEA country) to enter or stay in Germany (AufenthG § 3 Passpflicht).


2

Disclaimer: The following paragraphs are not to be used as a recommendation, but describes what we experienced. Others might encounter difficulties if for instance one gets selected for a check by customs. Well, we didn't have time to get the passport, and didn't want to spend a lot of money on an emergency passport, so we went ahead and tried. The following ...


2

After you get your passport in San Francisco, head over to the Chinese consulate in the morning to apply for you visa and hope they're willing--one day service is discretionary. Your window is very tight, don't be surprised if you can't make it.


2

I don't know about the Chinese consulates in Norway, but for the Chinese consulates in the U.S., you need to either use a U.S. passport, or show them evidence of lawful presence in the U.S. If you are a national of Norway applying in Norway, then they want you to use your Norwegian passport, because the rates for different countries' nationals may be ...


1

Norwegian citizens do not need a visa for Canada However, bear in mind that you're admitted to the US for 90 days, and that that clock continues while you're in Canada and on re-entry to the US


1

An I-94 is not a visa, it's a record of your admission into the US, which also defines how long you may stay in the country. You typically had to fill in a form to get this I-94. Nowadays, the I-94 is often electronic but if you enter by land, you should still get a paper one. The I-94W is the same thing but for the visa waiver program (i.e. people who ...


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