Hot answers tagged

42

This is Norangsfjorden which branches from Hjørundfjorden to the East. The small village in the foreground is Urke. I assume the pic was taken from or near the summit of Leknesnakken, a mountain directly west of Urke. See this pic from Google Maps: Here's another pic, showing both Norangsfjorden (left) and Hjørundfjorden (right), with Urke in the lower left ...


41

Having worked as a boat pilot for a dive center, I have to agree with @Arthur's Pass answer. You must understand that is is really hard to spot someone swimming in the water, you will be hidden behind any small wave. Also, the bigger the boat, the less the pilot looks out for things like swimmers, especially in an area where there is usually no swimmers. ...


37

Just chiming in as a local that the area is frequented by not just ships with professional equipment and captained by professionals but also by many locals out for a quick fishing trip, leisurely drive, or, in rare cases, quick trips using small fast craft. These are unlikely to notice a single swimmer with no marker. (As an aside, the sides of Litle ...


23

I cannot answer all points for you, but as I kayak frequently on bodies of water used by ships (also sometimes in narrow ship channels or in places like the Lorelei), here are some points to think about. They stay the same for both swimmers and small boats, so they are relevant even if you decide to rent a kayak or canoe. And one specifically for swimmers: ...


20

In downtown Bodø, a couple of hundred meters away from your planned swim, is Bodø Radio, one of the headquarters of the Maritime Radio (contact page). They may be able to assist you in several ways: They have the ability to reach out to boats in the area, warning boats about the presence of a swimmer in the strait. This is the way of coordinating things ...


20

To add to the "bad idea" suggestions, I looked up the traffic density on marinetraffic.com and got this result (unfortunately the highest zoom at which it draws the density maps): Converting the units of the red areas to ships per 0.005 sq km per hour (crudely dividing by hours in a year) gives about 2.5 ships per 70 x 70 metre square per hour, ...


5

I've found an interesting video that shows what the Northern Lights look like to the naked eye in real time. It appears that it can indeed be quite impressive, although not as impressive as in the sped up footage:


4

If some parts look newer or the boat is in a much better shape than expected based on age, they can demand to see invoices and details of where and when the boat was serviced. If you cannot document the boat maintenance history (which might also be desirable or even mandatory for other reasons) or produce invoices for parts and material, that could be enough ...


4

Most of the enforcement is based on trust. The border controls are certainly more frequent now than usual, but there are no regular or permanent controls when entering Norway from Finland or Sweden.


3

Be aware that my answer describes the current situation. If you are not going to Norway until next year, it is very much possible, and I would even assume, that relevant details of the regulation have changed by then. You are right that most persons entering Norway are currenty subject to a 10 days quarantine and the general rule is that the period must be ...


2

All other information I can find about the petroglyph point to the same spot that you have found. On an older official map of the area, a historical site is marked with the symbol ᚱ at the same spot (upper, middle part of the map I linked to). Latitude 67.2975205 degrees 67°17′51.07388″ Longitude 14.9053096 degrees 14°54′19.11451″ At least on that map (...


2

You can swim in pretty much every lake in Norway. There are some lakes that are used for drinking water, but these will have signs saying that swimming is illegal. Any dangerous bacteria that can make you sick: Nope If you're not in an urban areas of close to pasture you can actually drink the water straight from the rivers (or even from the lakes if there ...


1

You're incorrectly informed and so the question is moot. A COVID-19 test is worthless in Norway. You will need to self-isolate, but it's very lax: you can go out but must keep distance from those you're not staying with, and for border control you'll need a printed accommodation confirmation for your whole stay (up to 10 days). Also, use public transport for ...


1

Arne is right. Snowy, muddy or any other forms of shoes are not used inside private houses at all. We wear socks or a type of slipper. Inside a business, shoes that are clean enough can be worn, but you will find mats at the doors or just inside to wipe off excess muck. You will not have to worry about feeling cold even in socks, as all places are heated, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible