Hot answers tagged

51

No, in itself it is not rude. You can do it in a rude way, by just ignoring the signals if the other person is not happy about it. Offer the person you talk with the choice. I would start with a Norwegian hello or good morning/day, and next try out which language sits best. One time in Norway I was asked to speak Dutch rather than English (I speak no ...


48

Norway has a very extensive right-to-roam called allemannsrett. From the website of the Norwegian Environment Agency: In open country in the lowlands, you can pitch a tent and camp overnight for up to 48 hours in one location without prior permission from the landowner. In the mountains, and in remote, sparsely populated areas, you may camp for longer ...


48

As far as I can determine, there's no general law against smoking on a balcony in Norway. However, smoking on balconies seems to be a common source of annoyance among neighbours (see e.g. here) and a housing association may legally forbid smoking on the balconies of its properties (see here and here). You need to check the terms of your rental agreement and ...


45

Assuming that the payment is due to Statens Innkrevningssentral (the government collection agency), you can pay online with credit card by going the their web site, click on 'pay by card' and follow the instructions in the popup. They ask for a KID, which you will find on the bank giro slip you already have. Card payments are charged an additional NOK 40 fee....


37

Unless you plan to read/watch something written in Nynorsk, you should go for Bokmål. Most Norwegians have this as their written language, and it's close to what is spoken in the Oslo/Hurum area. Bokmål and Nynorsk are not that different though... Riksmål is sort of the old-fashioned version of Bokmål (basically the name was changed to Bokmål in 1929), ...


34

First of all, as a tourist in Norway you will be able to get by with English. Nobody expects tourists to have learned any of the Norwegian languages. I do not speak Norwegian but a friend of my does, learned it as a foreigner, and has a good view on the languages as she has lived in several areas. If you want to learn a few words, just to be polite, it ...


30

If you're underage, confirm in advance with the locations you'll be traveling. Couch surfing is out of the picture if you're using couchsurfing.com, since being under 18 violates the terms of service. Some hostels will allow you to stay if you're above the age of 16, but they usually require parental authorization. Some just have a form, some require a ...


28

Treriksröset is not reachable by road. You can get there on foot or ski (perhaps kayak too but there may be some rapids to navigate upstream). Mountain-bike may work (I'm not sure). From your screenshot it appears Google Maps knows the trail on the Norwegian side, but not the shorter and much more popular hiking trail on the Finnish side. Openstreetmap ...


27

As a native of Norway, I need to clarify something: Bokmål, Riksmål and Nynorsk are not spoken dialects. They are written languages. You cannot learn to speak or listen to them, you can only learn to read and write them. These three written languages are so similar that people who know one of them can easily read and understand something written in any of ...


27

Longyearbyen is a very small town with a population of not much more than 2,000. Within the town centre, you can reach everything easily by foot and even the outskirts of the town are only 2-3km from the centre. The area is quite steep though. The Nybyen district in the souther part of the town is about 300m higher than the city centre. The only public ...


27

No, you do not have to declare these to customs or expect any problems bringing ice axes to Norway. They are freely available to buy in Norway and not categorized as a weapon. They are obviously not allowed in hand luggage and explicitly mentioned in the list of prohibited items by the Norwegian aviation authorities.


25

To answer your question (and also limit the answer to entering Norway), Norwegian custom rules only allow you to make use of the duty free allowance once every 24 hour. Quoting from Norwegian Custom's information page on the duty free allowance: Hvis du er i utlandet kortere enn ett døgn: Ved utenlandsopphold på mindre enn ett døgn kan du én gang i ...


25

It is neither rude, nor arrogant, but I am not sure if I see any point in doing so. If you don't understand Norwegian very well, you are very likely to have larger difficulties with the rural dialects in Trøndelag, and especially if you have a foreign accent when speaking Swedish, you can not take it for granted that all Norwegians will understand your ...


24

You may be aware that your case should be governed by directive 2004/38/EC concerning the right of freedom of movement of EU citizens and their family members. Chapter VI of the directive says this: RESTRICTIONS ON THE RIGHT OF ENTRY AND THE RIGHT OF RESIDENCE ON GROUNDS OF PUBLIC POLICY, PUBLIC SECURITY OR PUBLIC HEALTH Article 27 General ...


22

victoriah wrote in her answer: It's a generally accepted fact that the Scandinavian countries are the most expensive places to travel. But personally, having travelled a lot within Europe and within Scandinavia, I don't think it's SO much more expensive in comparison to the rest of Europe. I'm from Finland—another Nordic country generally ...


22

It's a generally accepted fact that the Scandinavian countries are the most expensive places to travel. But personally, having travelled a lot within Europe and within Scandinavia, I don't think it's SO much more expensive in comparison to the rest of Europe. Where prices differ is generally when it comes to alcohol (much more expensive), junk food/...


22

When importing food to Norway, you are not only affected by custom regulations (they are usually relevant when it comes to taxation of products), but you also have to adhere to the regulations from the Norwegian Food Safety Authority (Mattilsynet). The EU regulation 206/2009 is in effect in Norway and tells (page 12, paragraph 5) that you can bring 2kg of ...


21

As others have said, a car is not needed and not that useful. But there are in fact a few roads and a taxi service beside the airport shuttle. Nybyen, where the only hostel is located, is a bit outside the rest of Longyearbyen, maybe a couple of kilometres up Longyear Valley. That's perfectly doable by foot (that's what I did most of the time last winter and ...


21

I just asked the customer service and there is a bus service operating on demand between Namsskogan station and Smalåsen for every train stopping in Namsskogan. The service must be ordered in advance, either by contacting customer service by phone +4707417 or +4775771861 (the short service number is not necessarily reachable from outside Norway). The price ...


19

When entering or leaving Norway with more currency than the equivalent of NOK 25,000 (appr. USD 3,000), you have to provide a declaration to the Norwegian customs. You can find a more detailed description of the procedure at their web page on this subject. If you are only transiting between international flights in Oslo, you are however for the purpose of ...


19

While it is generally not illegal to smoke outdoors in Norway (except where children is involved, they have special protections in the law), as a Norwegian myself, I'll note that smoking on shared balconies is considered quite rude by most people, unless you have cleared it with the other users first. Most people in Norway does not appreciate being subject ...


18

As a Norwegian I will say that we mostly wouldn't find it rude at all (rightfully so), problem is that the response will be in Norwegian and that might pose a problem for you as you have stated. For interacting with anyone within 15-50 years I would say just speak English. For older people it might be an idea to ask if they speak English first. Also keep ...


17

If you are caught with smaller amounts of alcohol exceeding the allowed amount, the customs will offer you to accept a "forenklet forelegg", a kind of fixed rate fine used in the Norwegian legal system for minor issues, e.g. traffic violations or breach of the custom regulations. For beverages with 22.1 to 60% alcohol by volume, the rates are as such (...


16

It might only solve a part of your problem, but there are plenty of camping sites in Sweden and Norway, where you have at least access to usually very decent sanitary installations (toilets and showers). Many of the camping sites have recreational rooms and/or communal kitchens, where you can spend some time inside, meet people and cook some food. Most ...


15

You will find your answers on the website of the Norwegian customs authority. In my interpretation, you can import this honey to Norway, because: the goods are for you or are a private gift and not intended for sale or commercial use you bring the goods with you, either on your person or in your luggage The value is less than NOK 6,000 (approx. EUR 815). (...


14

Beyond that specific case, there are a number of rules that can be used to make sure duty-free allowances are difficult to abuse (not all of them might apply to any one country and some might be difficult to enforce): Time-based limit as already mentioned by others. Alternatively, the allowance can also be limited to one use "per trip" (the end of the trip ...


14

You can camp on "out-land", which is anything not maintained/cultivated like lawns, fields, etc. I don't think ownership is an issue (no land is not owned). In "low-land" (<200m above sea level?) you can only camp (raise a tent) for two days in the same place, in the "high-land" (everything else) there is no limit. https://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


13

The import laws cited on the the page of Norway's Toll Office do not distinguish between the manner the alcohol has been created (because that would likely be rather difficult); only by the strength. You're allowed for free (see the link for how much you have to pay if you need to import larger quantities): One litre of an alcoholic beverage containing more ...


13

Always, if in doubt, declare them. My guess is that they would be quite familiar with these objects, but if they ask you if you have any weapons, say "no, but I have some ice axes for ice climbing [or whatever purpose you have in mind]". They'll probably nod and go on to the next question.


13

As a native Swedish speaker I will talk Swedish when with Norwegians and Norwegians with Swedes will usually speak Norwegian. However depending on your how comfortable you are with the respective language, you can throw in the Norwegian words you know and try to speak with a more similar melody/prosody. Limit your vocabulary to a more basic one for less ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible