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51

I have not climbed mount Everest, but I just came back from Pokhara, Nepal after some treks. I also went to the Himalayan Mountain Institute in Darjeeling, which is possibly the nearest place for you to get some experience before going on your adventure. On a generous ballpark figure, I would say it will cost you about $50,000 (USD) for the entire trip. ...


45

Climbing Everest from Nepal requires a special permit, and climbers who successfully summit the mountain receive a certificate of acknowledgment from the Nepalese government. The money gathered from the permits go towards cleaning up the mountain1, which is considered a holy place by some local populations. If Wang Jing did indeed use a helicopter to ...


34

No, there is no way without hiking from base camp at least. I have had extensive talks with three people who went up there either as a tourist or even as a professional Sherpa. The one and only helicopter landing that is cited on Wikipedia was an extreme stunt and not something that is done in any kind of routine for tourists. The helicopter neither touched ...


30

It is not straightforward to fly a helicopter to these altitudes, land, and take off again. It's risky, and the results depend on the weather, which can change without warning. The helicopter is operating near the limit of the thinnest air in which it can fly, and it's less maneuverable than normal. The Nepalese army used to do helicopter rescues on Everest, ...


18

This is a well-trod trail on the backpacker circuit, and Seat 61 has the full scoop, but here's the outline: Train from Delhi to the end of the line at Gorakhpur, overnight, US$10-50 depending on class of sleeper Bus to border at Sunauli, one and half hours, ~$2 Cross border on foot Bus to Kathmandu, 9-12 hours (overnight buses available), ~$6 So it's ...


15

India had tried to curb unauthorized trading between these countries by requesting they ban them. However, as of 2013, Nepal and India have agreed to allow 500, 1000 notes again. The Bhutan Monetary Authority also banned it for similar reasons. However, as of January 2015, the RBI has also allowed travelers to take these notes to Bhutan. So yes, that ...


14

What I did for my three months long backpacking trip is that I brought 500 Euros in cash and exchanged it on my first, second day. I probably shouldn't have done that as the exchange rate got significantly better in the next few weeks. I also had rest of my money on my (Croatian) bank account and had my Visa debit card with me. Along with this card, I have ...


14

It really depends on where you hire the porter, your bargain skills and what kind of porter you want. A price between $10-20 is probably ok, but remember that if you do this using an agency the porter will get very little himself (maybe $4-8 a day) because all the profit goes to the middlemen. Therefore, please bargain hard with the agency and rather give ...


12

Yes, a form of ID is still required, otherwise how would you prove that you're an Indian citizen? A Kiwi could rock up and say 'hi I'm Indian, I don't need a visa'. However, it doesn't need to be a passport. From the Department of Immigration of the Government of Nepal: Information for Indian Citizens To allow Indian citizens to make travel ...


12

It costs a hefty amount of $30000 to $80000 but on average most people pay around $45000.It also depends on whether you take a Tibetian route or the route from Nepal. But the expense largely depends on the cost of the following components: travel up to base camp $5000-$10000 permit & insurance $7000-$11000 climbing fee $10000-$15000 insurance, ...


12

There is a very limited number of border crossings between Tibet and Nepal where foreigners are allowed to cross. In fact I think that there are at the moment only two: Hilsa and Kyirong. For Chinese or Nepali there are a few more, but the summit of Mount Everest is not one of them. If you cross the border at Mount Everest, or any other illegal spot, you ...


11

I've been asking similar questions myself as I had a week booked from 16th May, plus a short trip next week. It is hard to see how the itinerary you describe could be feasible by the date your parents travel. A magnitude 7.9 earthquake leaves widespread damage over a large area, and the areas your parents propose to visit are in the worst-hit area. Many ...


11

Update: The border crossing between Tibet and Nepal has re-opened as of September 2017. Detailed post by The Land of Snows. Old post: It is currently impossible to cross the border. (unless you hold a Chinese or Nepali passport.) Recent info from The Land of Snows (which I have praised in an unrelated answer) as of 27 July 2016 (updated 23 Jan 2017): ...


11

Yes, such a trip is doable, via India. Reasoning the route Outdated: As I wrote in this post, it is currently impossible to reach Nepal via land from China, leaving only border crossings with India in question. Update: The route from Tibet into Nepal is open again, meaning that you could in theory also consider routes via China. However the option via ...


10

My first reaction on reading this question was to wonder if it was a joke or an attempt to satirize the concept of "extreme tourism." If so, then well done. If not, then I would like to correct an apparent misconception stated in the question. "Hiking too far" is not a good description of what it takes to climb a mountain that's over 8000 m high. Climbing ...


10

I just asked my host here in Kathmandu and without hesitation he replied... CHOCOLATE! Not the local stuff but nice imported chocolate. Apparently it's a big hit.


10

Its open only for Indian or Nepalese citizens. Its not open for citizens of other countries. This is a Nepalese link which says Indian citizen entering Nepal should have proper identity to prove that they are valid Indian citizens, that means no need of visa. And this is a link from Indian Embassy in Nepal. On first line it says: Introductory ...


10

I visited the Annapurna range in Novemember/December. There was plenty of snow on the high mountains, it looked very picturesque. If you want to reach the snow line you will have to reach an altitude of at least 4000 metres. Do not attempt this without acclimatising first. You should be able to get a bus from Kathmandu to Besisahar. From there you should be ...


10

I grew up in Nepal and I suggest you go to places like Dhulikhel, Banepa, Bandipur and Pokhara. These places are 3-4 hours of drive from Kathmandu and you can easily get into a bus from Kalanki, Kathmandu. The top places for snow would be Phulchowki. I have personally trekked there and I think you can get a bus to take you there as well. The view from the ...


10

No, the Aadhaar (UID) card is not acceptable. The Indian Ministry of Home Affairs lists what can be used. Identity documents required for Indian Citizen going to / coming from Nepal by Air :- (i) Valid National Passport. (ii) Photo Identity card issued by the Government of India/State Govt./UT Administration in India to their employees or ...


9

I would have advised you to buy your outdoor clothes in Delhi but your trip timing could be crucial to whether you get a good deal or not. Branded sports / outdoor clothing stores have sales of autumn clothes in autumn and spring, i.e., when they are about to bring in fresh stock and when demand drops off, respectively. Right now, by Indian standards, Delhi ...


8

I don't have any experience on the Eastern side of the Himalaya, but I did some travelling on the Western side in China, in areas with high numbers of Tibetan people. As usually I did not plan or book anything but mostly stayed in hotels in towns, but a few times I also just walked in the mountains through some villages and when I asked people for a place ...


8

Just came back from my trekking vacation in Nepal. It's possible (and simple) to get to the lake without camping, using local guesthouses. It requires no special means like helicopters, and it even helps with acclimatization before the Thorung La Pass.


8

UPDATE: As of November 30, 2012 the "2 month" rule has been removed for nationals of all countries EXCEPT Afghanistan, China, Iran, Pakistan, Iraq, Sudan, foreigners of Pakistan and Stateless persons. Until a few years ago an Indian Multiple Entry Tourist Visa allowed you to exit and re-enter the country with no time restrictions, which made what you're ...


8

It seems it is not required; as stated at the airport's website: Visas are required for all foreigners wishing to enter into Nepal except for Indian nationalities, who need to fish out their identity at the counter to identify themselves. Further from the Nepal Tourism Board's welcomenepal.com website: Indian nationals do not require visa to enter ...


8

the first, second and 4th image show a large, unforested area with a distinctly differently colored patch. this appears to match the Manpur region on Nasa satellite maps of Nepal (the yellow area circled below), although it also could match the kathmandu region (yellow dots): Mount Everest lies in the orange circle. I've tried to match that area to the ...


8

Indian nationals do not require a visa to enter Nepal. As per the Nepalese immigration, Indian nationals traveling to Nepal must posses any one of the following documents: Passport. Driving License with photo. Photo Identity card issued by a Government Agency. Ration Card with Photo. Election Commission Card with Photo . Identity Card issued by Embassy of ...


8

Discover Nepal, the official tourism site for the country, also recommends flying (as did @Max): For those on a tight time-frame taking a mountain flight from Kathmandu is by far the easiest and quickest way to see Everest. It's as simple as arriving in Kathmandu on day one and booking a flight for the next morning. You'll be flying right beside the world’...


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