67

The picture is of horses in the road. When I stayed with friends in The New Forest, UK, where free range ponies roam (not actually wild), they often block the road in groups, and nothing apparently will move them. But my friend taught me how: Be gentle, do not alarm them, give them time. Open the car windows, so the ponies can see you, and then Lightly pat ...


36

In my country, since it's a large country with a lot of long highways across deserts and mountains where a wide range of animals cross the streets (mainly camels, baboons and donkeys), I have faced that a lot. I am unaware if there are laws for this, but out of personal experience I learned a few Dos and Don'ts: Before approaching them, ensure no cars on ...


22

Stay in your car, as in the car you are a car and not a danger or enemy. Walking you may be seen as danger and the animals may try to scare you off, which can be dangerous for your health. If you do have the time, I would wait and enjoy. But if it takes long or if you are in a hurry you can drive slowly forward. Most of the animals living near roads are ...


17

It depends on the species. If you're driving in Sápmi (Lapland) and there are reindeer on the road, shout at them. They'll understand a human voice much better than a car honk or engine. You may need to get out of your car so they can see as well as hear you. If you just honk, they will probably just keep staring at your car in mild curiosity. If you do ...


10

Yes. The Ashikaga Flower Park is within day trip distance from Tokyo, and has a wisteria tunnel (as well as some other very impressive non-tunnel wisteria.) I've been there during peak wisteria and I think it's well worth the visit, but be prepared for some serious crowds (easily accessible to you from Tokyo means easily accessible for everyone from Tokyo!)


10

In the UK, the Highway code offers specific guidance: Rule 214 Animals. When passing animals, drive slowly. Give them plenty of room and be ready to stop. Do not scare animals by sounding your horn, revving your engine or accelerating rapidly once you have passed them. Look out for animals being led, driven or ridden on the road and take extra care. ...


8

First, look for people. If the animals are with some people, just sit tight and wait. A few minutes won't hurt you. The people can see you, you don't need to make noises or otherwise let them know you planned to drive through here. They know that. Second, evaluate whether you think these are completely wild animals (monkey, moose, elephant, rhino) or likely ...


6

To add to the other very good answers already posted: Remember that for most animals, a road isn't really their ideal place to be. There's nothing growing there to graze on, and the ground is hard and hot. For that reason, most animals you'll encounter are actually in transit over the roadway (just like you), not congregating long-term. Try to judge ...


6

I would wait at least a few minutes. There does not seem to be anything edible on the road, and there are some tasty (to horses) looking weeds on either side, so they will probably not stay on the road for long. If they do not move in the next 10 minutes or so I would slowly edge the car forward. Honking, or any sudden move, might spook them, creating risk ...


6

Federal law very generally allows an adult non-felon citizen to transport a firearm across state lines under 18 U.S. Code § 926A, provided he or she can legally possess it at both origin and destination: Notwithstanding any other provision of any law or any rule or regulation of a State or any political subdivision thereof, any person who is not otherwise ...


4

Take a walk along the High Line. It’s a former elevated freight railway line that has been converted into a walkway or linear park. https://www.thehighline.org/ You might find some other interesting things to do nearby.


4

At this time of the year, the risk of heavy snowfall is low, but you never know. Of course, the risk increases as you go higher, so it depends on your actual route. Many of the passes and roads on or near the border are well over 2000 meters high, and some may be closed as early as October. Grand St Bernard Pass and Stilfser Joch / Passo dello Stelvio are ...


3

Most "kinda tame" animals such as the ones in the photo (horses) will move away if something big approaches. As will many, but not all "wild" animals. Most will, without panic, avoid something that makes (moderate) noise, most will react rather negatively to something that makes sudden, harsh noises or is moving rapidly. Most animals will react favorably to ...


3

This isn't just a matter of the shipping companies being difficult. Each state has its own regulations about what plants can be brought into their jusridiction, and what inspections are required. It is, for example, forbidden to take citrus trees into Californa without having them inspected, These regulations exist to protect the local industries from the ...


2

In a more general sense, what to do will depend on many factors, including: where you are, the size and number of animals, the type of animal, the type of road, the vehicle you are driving, how fast you are going when you first see the animals, local laws, whether the animals are attended by someone (a farmer for example), and so on. In general try to avoid ...


2

Specific to deer (and perhaps other ungulates) in the night-time: the phenomena of deer frozen in the headlights is well-known. I encountered it once. Flashing high beam (from dipped beam) did nothing. Switching to sidelights did: the deer relaxed and moved away as soon as I switched. The deer weren't entirely frozen in my headlights. My car was one of ...


2

I've lived at the place in Sweden with the most mosquitos and I'm a certified ecologist. Sweden is a fairly large country. To know if Sweden will be "full of mosquitos" where you will be you need to know why there are mosquitos at some places. You can only find mosquitos near water sources like lakes, rivers and bogs. If you're not close to any water then ...


2

Simplest- the zoo Phuket Zoo seems to have them based on this photo I found on the internet, which is titled: "Picture of Nycticebus bengalensis / Northern slow loris at Phuket Zoo": Plain link attribution: https://zooinstitutes.com/animals/northern-slow-loris-phuket-zoo-14525.html I would like to add that I don't recommend Phuket Zoo. There are better ...


2

I think the answer of jcaron is already pretty good. The official weather forecast service of the government (MeteoSuisse) gives some additional information about the first snow in automn in Switzerland. Unfortunately the page is only available in german, french and italian but not english. There is no precise information about somewhere in the alps in ...


1

It is a mountain area, there is always risk of cold weather and snow, even in early fall when in high altitude. Currently the weather around Tre Cime is on the colder sider with freezing temperature at night. https://www.mountain-forecast.com/peaks/Tre-Cime-di-Lavaredo/forecasts/2973 Hope for the best, prepare for the worse. You need proper hiking ...


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