118

Ushba, Upper Svaneti, Georgia I dug around in the photos posted by that same photographer on Shutterstock, and found this landscape image. The peak in the landscape appears to be the same peak as in the photo of the hikers. In the images below, I've circled five of the features that I'm basing this on. The distinctive snow-capped peak in the landscape ...


100

Downshifting - you gotta know it Avoiding hills is simply not an option. Mountain driving is a lot like a roller coaster. The truck works really hard going up a long, long uphill, and then on the long downhill, gravity takes it and it goes like a rocket. Mountain driving is all about controlling this. On mountain driving, especially with trucks, you ...


34

No, there is no way without hiking from base camp at least. I have had extensive talks with three people who went up there either as a tourist or even as a professional Sherpa. The one and only helicopter landing that is cited on Wikipedia was an extreme stunt and not something that is done in any kind of routine for tourists. The helicopter neither touched ...


33

To add to the other answers, some paths my be susceptible to soil erosion - from foot traffic and rainfall. This eventually makes some sections almost impassable for some people, as well as damaging the terrain and surrounding vegetation. I have seen this first hand in Hong Kong. For example: So in many places, steps are built. In HK these were originally ...


30

If you really want to go 'only' by car, you will have to approach from the south. Coming from the north, you would either have to cross the Grimsel Pass on route 6 or the Furka Pass on route 19. Both are already permanently closed for the winter. As an alternative to crossing the Furka Pass, you can however use the train shuttle service between Realp and ...


25

I climbed Mount Fuji 5 years ago. I would say: I don't think Earthquakes are a realistic danger on Mount Fuji (if there is one, probably better to be out in the open than under a roof that can collapse anyway). As ohers have already mentioned, the climb is not too technical but quite tiring. The last hour is especially terrible, walking on volcanic sand and ...


22

Usually driving down a steep hill with narrow turns is more dangerous down than up for the simple reason that gravity will accelerate you going downhill. Going up hill gravity slows you down and your engine needs to work to overcome that which usually means that you're not driving fast enough to lose control, although the condition of the road may still ...


21

Water regulations in Switzerland are very strict and most tap water is of impeccable quality. There is also a law which states that any fountain, which doesn't have regulated drinking water, has to be declared as such, so if you see a fountain with no sign on a village square, it's very likely safe to be drunk. This is most likely the reason why there is a ...


18

Pick the side that hugs you closest to the interior. No matter if it zig-zags or has switchbacks, take a look at it and stick to the inside. In Australia, this may mean taking the route that hugs the left side. In Oman, this always meant the route that hugged the right side.


18

Is your concern traffic, snow, difficulty of the road, ...? Google Maps thinks that I-80 and I-84 will be your best routes to Portland from, say, Kansas City (other parts of Kansas won't have a terrible time reaching I-80). US Interstates are almost always designed well, with reasonable curves. If you are concerned, you can check the height of the ...


18

The answers by Jim MacKenzie and Harper are both full of good advice, and the suggestions to use I-80/I-84 are great. I have taken that route with a 16ft box van. I just want to note one more thing you should be aware of. Based on your description, it sounds like you might be going to the Portland/West Coast area. If so, you are most likely going to take I-...


17

My parents live in the countryside (in the UK, not Colombia, admittedly), their tap water comes from a natural spring. They don't drink it. The problem is the water like this tends to be in the open have a lot of crap can get in there. Including literal crap, live and dead animals, chemicals from farms and other businesses, etc, etc. The closer you get to ...


15

When many people climb the same path every day, natural rocks become smooth, slippery and dangerous. An example in Europe is the path to Château de Montségur in the french Pyrenees. Stairs are less prone to such wear over time.


14

Wikivoyage will tell you all you need to know: Mount Fuji The TL;DR version: The mountain is officially open to climbers only from July to early September. Visiting outside the official season is legal but inadvisable unless you know what you're doing, since everything is closed and the weather can be extreme. It's cold up there, temps at the summit can ...


13

Down is more dangerous. There are three factors contributing to this. When you need to decide on a slowdown in case of potential accident, you basically need to annihilate momentum, and when you are going up, gravity contributes to the total work needed to slow down. When you are going down, gravity works against your intent to slow down, and brakes alone ...


12

Something other answers haven't gone into details about are how the interstates are designed through most of these passes. On the steeper uphill sections, the interstate expands into extra lanes to allow for big trucks that have trouble moving at reasonable freeway speeds (you have to move all the way to the right). Typically, if you are slow on an uphill ...


11

This painting can be found online (and a friend of mine did) and here is a link. That site mentions the picture to be by an unknown artist but the title to the picture: "Herbst Am Silsersee". Herbst means autumn (or fall,) Silsersee translates to Lake Sils, and that has a Wikipedia page. And that lake is located in Switzerland and that makes it the Alps ...


10

You typically want to enter (yes, there is a kind of park entrance) Kawa Ijen as early as possible in order to avoid the dozens of people arriving by organized tours. I entered at 1am & it felt just fine. The best way to visit this amazing place is to do it on your own. You can then start as early as possible and take as much time as you like to enjoy ...


10

My first reaction on reading this question was to wonder if it was a joke or an attempt to satirize the concept of "extreme tourism." If so, then well done. If not, then I would like to correct an apparent misconception stated in the question. "Hiking too far" is not a good description of what it takes to climb a mountain that's over 8000 m high. Climbing ...


10

The best I can recommend to you is to become a member of the German Alpine Club (Deutscher Alpenverein, DAV) or the Austrian Alpine Club (ÖAV, all links in German). Membership costs varies depending on the "Sektion" you choose to become a member of (you can choose freely and I know many people who choose one purely based on cost) but is in the range of EUR50 ...


10

European point of view: Back in the times (or what I was told many years ago by some locals) is that they would let a donkey lead the group to find the path of least resistance. The natural instincts of the animal would find the best path for climbing (wonder what IQ is required ... as opposed to humans :) Considering they used the mules and such for loads/...


10

I'm very familiar with the European alps, but not at all familiar with the sacred mountains in China. So I can only address why stairs are rare in the alps: You mentioned hiking up the sacred mountains. The peak isn't that important in the Alps, so paths rarely take the shortest route to the peak. Instead you have a whole network of paths that link various ...


10

The cable car you have in mind is the Aiguille du Midi cable car. It goes all the way to the summit… of the Aiguille du Midi, not to the Mont Blanc itself. It's very close to the mont Blanc and you can take another cable car over the Mer de Glace to the Pointe Heilbronner, in Italy, to get more views of the massif. That's also where the “Step into the void” ...


9

It's taken in Hamnøy, in the Lofoten island in Norway. You can even make out the specific mountain shown in your photo in the image included on the Wikipedia page.


8

Many mountaineering agencies claim that there are 1310 peaks over 6000m in Nepal alone. Other agencies claim that there are thousands of such peaks in the world, meaning that no comprehensive list of peaks over 6000m probably exists. This makes sense, as peaks should intuitively follow some sort of power-law distribution, meaning that there should be much ...


8

You should be able to observe the blue flame each night, as it's the temperature of the flame and the substances burning. However, this is nature, nothing is guaranteed. Saying that, it is reliable enough that there are tours built around it. For example, the Paket Kawah Igen Blue Fire Tour. It's in Indonesia, but running it through Google Translate, ...


8

I have another possible explanation that I cannot corraborate with online sources at this time. I visited Japan several years ago, and as one does (and should definitely do), I visited many Buddhist temples and Shinto shrines while there. I believe it was a Buddhist temple (as opposed to a shrine) where I first noticed two sets of stairs. There was a ...


7

It is difficult to answer accurately as I do not know exactly what level of accommodation is required. Also the definition of a "settled place" place is unclear to me. However I will give it a go and provide different options. The highest place with a proper hotel accommodation is the Bokor Hill in Kampot province, altitude a bit over 1 km. The hotel is ...


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