37

I don't have any specific insights into how it's enforced on the ground but it doesn't seem particularly difficult. You cannot climb a mountain like that in a few hours or on your own. Even assuming you're a specialist and don't want to rely on local help (i.e. you're eshewing the “expedition style” climbing that's typical of the Himalayas), you would need ...


28

As of October 26th 2019, it will not be possible to climb Uluru: In line with the agreed process in the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park Management Plan 2010-2020 and the wishes of traditional owners, the climb to the top of Uluru will close on 26 October 2019. https://www.environment.gov.au/mediarelease/uluru-climb-close


17

In addition to the good answer you already have it's worth noting than climbing of all kinds had a very strong sense of ethics. This covers sporting integrity, environmental impact and cultural sensitivity, plus safety of course. 6000m+ mountaineering is also a pretty niche pursuit with a small community and you'd be unlikely to get to this level without ...


14

I just found out that I will be able to access the peak! By booking a night at the Altavista refuge, they let us climb to the peak in the early morning (only)! Access to the crater It is advisable to leave the refuge at about 6 am, to reach the Teide crater before dawn. When you stay overnight at Altavista del Teide Refuge, you are entitled to access Teide ...


10

The best I can recommend to you is to become a member of the German Alpine Club (Deutscher Alpenverein, DAV) or the Austrian Alpine Club (ÖAV, all links in German). Membership costs varies depending on the "Sektion" you choose to become a member of (you can choose freely and I know many people who choose one purely based on cost) but is in the range of EUR50 ...


8

Many mountaineering agencies claim that there are 1310 peaks over 6000m in Nepal alone. Other agencies claim that there are thousands of such peaks in the world, meaning that no comprehensive list of peaks over 6000m probably exists. This makes sense, as peaks should intuitively follow some sort of power-law distribution, meaning that there should be much ...


7

It is sad that most companies claim 98%, because there is really no truth behind those fact. If you ask them for the actual numbers most will not release them. We decided to climb with E-Trip Africa as they do put up statistics that seem a little more realistic. They claim 88-89% overall, and when I asked for actual numbers of people it calculated ...


7

The standard measure for a mountain's difficulty is the ratio of summits to fatalities. Per Wikipedia, as of 2009, the hardest mountain is Annapurna I in Nepal, with a ratio of 157 summit ascents and 60 deaths, or 38%. This means that, for every five people who reached the top, two died trying (or on the way back). I'll stick to a nice brisk walk around ...


6

According to this link there where 306 people climbing K2, 30 of which died. This would result in a fatality rate of ca. 10%. This table only includes actual successful ascents. This list lists 80 fatalities including those who died during the ascent. I couldn't find any number of attempted ascents though. On another note the success rate seems to have ...


6

One possibility you have is to find a hiking club. There are some all over the world and that's where you'll probably find the most involved hikers, those ready to invest money on long hiking trips, far from home. Most of these clubs have online forums or some sort of ad board where people would post any climbing partner search ad. They also organise these ...


6

You can also book a tour with an accredited tour guide. For example here : https://www.volcanoteide.com/en/activities/hiking


6

It is not possible to climb Mt. Kenya in one day. The usual route is 3days. Also cars are not allowed in the whole park. What you could do is driving to the entrance and than walk to one of the huts at, let's say 3500meters. So it is definitely a several day long trip... But it's worth it. I went to Mt. Kenya from Sandai Farm. They organizided everything. ...


5

I did something similar last year. From Zermatt a hiker can easily reach the Oberere Rothorn and the Mettelhorn, both 3,400+. The Mettelhorn is probably my best hike ever. 1800 metres ascent, a harmless glacier crossing (had no axe or crampons), and a wonderful view! My personal record is the Stockhorn from Gornergrat, at 3,532 on the newest map, but I ...


5

Searching for "Pico de Aneto" "without crampons" gives this UK Climbing result: Aneto - much the same as what's already said. Plenty of people were doing it in the middle of July last year without axe or crampons - but that would be a bit hairy for my taste. The last snow to the summit is steep, and if you did slip, stopping without an axe would ...


4

Not really. Fuji is, surprise surprise, a large mountain and the 5th bases are not connected. However, depending on which trails you take, you may be able to meet halfway through since some of them merge before the summit: (courtesy Japan Guide)


4

For upper body, you’ll need a windproof, breakable jacket and a medium jacket full of down or synthetic fill. For lower body, you'll need a pair of gore-tex windproof, waterproof and breathable trousers. Some medium weight polar fleece trousers, some medium weight thermal leggings, a pair of walking trousers (not cotton), some nylon shorts (not cotton) ...


4

Wolfram Alpha gives: 19 peaks above 8000m 95 peaks between 7000m and 8000m. One of its sources, Peakware finds: 20 peaks above 8000m. 99 peaks between 7000 and 8000m, 151 peaks between 6000m and 7000m, For Asia only, it finds 94 peaks between 6000m and 7000m, the peaks above 7000m are all in Asia.


3

Please don't do this. Uluru is sacred to the Pitjantjatjara Anangu. You wouldn't like if if some foreigner came to your country and started climbing up your sacred monument. Since there seems no other way to comment on the deletion of my answer: I did read Craig's (very recent) answer but didn't think it came over as a definite "don't do it" kind of ...


3

Depending on your definition, Wikipedia has a list of mountains by elevation. Certainly according to that, there are 6000ers outside of the Andes, Himalaya and Alaska - including peaks in Pakistan, Afghanistan, and Tibet (regions outside of the Himalaya). Summary: 14 peaks over 8000m. 93 peaks between 7000 and 8000m (meaning 107 peaks above 7000m) 75 ...


3

Obviously some aspects of weather can't be predicted, and will vary from day to day. However, you can give yourself a guide and estimate by considering general conditions, and other climbers' past experiences. For a past experience in October, I recommend having a look at this blog: The first of October aka. the day I finally climbed the north summit of ...


3

As far as I know UIAA is a federation of climbing and mountaineering clubs, you can see the full list here: http://www.theuiaa.org/member-federations.html. E.g. in the UK the only full member of UIAA is the British Mountaineering Council, and you can sign up to the BMA. In Poland there is the PZA, which again is a local federation of clubs. Which means that ...


3

None of them. Many huts close before the end of season and start later the beginning. There is no need to spend time in huts but they are convenient for hot drinks and food and water if you don't want to lift it up whole. The end and the beginning of seasons are not just random days. Beginning get delayed sometimes because trails are blocked by snow. And ...


2

According to the first Google hit http://www.chamonix.net/english/mountaineering/climb-mont-blanc , the route you describe is the "Cosmique Route", and it says ****The ideal period is from March to September (depending on conditions)**. So the answer to the question is yes. However this route is also much more technical than the standard route (see the text)...


2

Your question seems to arise from Wikipedia which says: Only members of a national UIAA club are allowed to climb the peak on their own. Other visitors have to take a certified mountain guide. As has been pointed out in the other answer by @Grzenio (to whom +1), you can not be a member of the UIAA but of a national member club, as correctly stated in ...


1

Depends on high up you want to go. You can take the train up the Jungfraujoch. That's almost 3500 m of altitude and hence it's cold, even in Summer. Means: below freezing even in August. Check out http://www.jungfrau.ch/en/tourism/destinations/jungfraujoch-top-of-europe/weather/ Prepare for ice, snow, and significant sub-zero temperatures. The lower you ...


1

Climbing Mount Arragats in October is totally fine. I did it by myself. Just you have to be sure about timing as the days are shorter. Also it is much colder. You don't need a guide, but you have to be well prepared and know what are you doing. Especially on the North summit, the last ridge is pretty dangerous! There is no mandatory guide needed and there ...


1

You can reach the summit without the permit and even without staying at the refuge by hiking early morning with a headlight from the parking by Montana Blanca and passing by the permit check on the way from the summit before 9 am. Most guides say the route N7 Mtña. Blanca takes over 5.5 hours, but if you are fit, you can make it within 3 hours by hiking fast ...


1

All climbers, all routes 45% All climbers, all 5 day routes 27% All climbers, all 6 day routes 44% All climbers, all 7 days routes 64% All climbers, all 8 day routes 85% All climbers, all 9 day routes (no data) Source: https://www.ultimatekilimanjaro.com/days.htm I'm trying to track down the origins of these statistics


1

Depending on what you consider the boundary of Europe, Mount Elbrus can be considered the highest point in Europe. At 5642 m, it's considerably taller than Mont Blanc (4810 m). The standard route is pretty nontechnical, and requires only an ice ax and crampons.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible