33

YMQ is a catchall for the airports in the Montreal metro area (similarly, LON is used for London, TYO for Tokyo, NYC for New York, etc.). YUL is the main international airport (Pierre Eliott Trudeau) YMX is Mirabel airport (cargo only right now, as far as I know) YHU is Saint-Hubert, used for smaller planes on shorter routes from within the province of ...


26

I was in Montreal a few months ago, and I was worried about this. I tried my best to learn some French through podcasts (Coffee Break French - I really liked Coffee Break Spanish), but I still felt like I was floundering. Be aware though, that just 10 words can get you very far, if they're the right words. Hello, Goodbye, Please, Thank you, Yes, No, "...


20

The simplest choice is taking the 747 bus line. It runs 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and takes about 45 minutes to an hour depending on traffic. It also features WiFi service on lots of the buses and luggage racks. The bus stops at many places between the Lionel-Groulx and Berri-UQAM metro stations. The ticket costs 10 dollars and includes unlimited access ...


17

On flights into Canada they repeatedly announce that all passengers must claim their bags and clear customs at the first point of entry, regardless of their final destination within Canada or elsewhere. Repeatedly. Also customs in Montreal usually asks if you have checked bags. It is really unfortunate that you were given wrong information by Qatar Airlines. ...


15

Ottawa we can pretty safely drop from the list -- as a planned city populated mostly by government bureaucrats, it's got a few good museums but very little else to interest the casual visitor, and it's quite hard to get around without a car. Montreal vs Toronto is a more interesting showdown. Personally, I'd cast my vote for Montreal: it feels a bit ...


15

The Quebec Highway Safety Code contains the following definitions (italics mine): “bus” means a motor vehicle, other than a minibus, designed for the transportation of more than nine occupants at a time and used mainly for that purpose or equipped with devices to secure wheelchairs against movement; ... “minibus” means a motor vehicle ...


13

I was there (and Quebec City) back in March. I knew a few basic words in French, and I think most people like it when you respond in the same language as them. I generally responded in my mangled French, they'd usually smile and without asking, switch to English to communicate with me. No fuss, no question, they'd just change. Very hospitable. Basically, ...


13

I've actually hitchhiked tens of thousands of miles across North America, and while I haven't done any in the past few years (so things may have changed a little) I think it's certainly possible to do this in under two weeks. I've gone from Massachusetts to California in six days, for instance. What I don't have is any experience hitchhiking as a woman, so ...


12

I have no first-hand experience, but taking the train looks like a nice option. The trip takes slightly more than 3 hours, and quoting Via Rail's schedule, there are "five departures every weekday from both Montréal and Québec City, and three departures on Saturdays and Sundays". It looks like baggage allowance won't be a problem either. Regarding the ...


12

To answer your question, it is useful but not that important. You are correct in saying that the majority of people in Montreal understand English. The majority also understand French too. You will also find that there are many people who live here which speak neither of these languages and have been in Montreal for a decade or more! You should be prepared ...


12

There reserved lanes are not just for buses. Taxis are allowed too. Here is the official statement which is valid for the greater Montreal region. As you can see, it does not say minibus which are a different category of vehicle. Considering that a taxi as bus is allowed but both are commercial passenger vehicles, I would be very surprised if they would ...


10

Your ability to leave the Montreal airport is subject solely to time constraints. You will be admitted to Canada in Montreal, or wherever in Canada you first disembark, so you will not be subject to immigration control between Montreal and Halifax. Your visa will perhaps be checked by the airline to verify your status, but there's no question of being "...


9

If those are your three choices, I'd suggest Montreal. Montreal and Ottawa are a less than two hours from eachother, so you can easily take a morning train and spend the day there, before returning to Montreal. Ottawa is a beautiful city, and is home to some of the best museums in the world (see Museum of Civilization, Air and Space Museum, and more). Also ...


8

Contrary to the popular opinion I would strongly recommend against the trains. Reason being the trains run slower then buses, for example the Maple Leaf which runs NYP-Toronto runs 12h 30min and makes a bunch of stops. Adirondak which runs NYP-Montreal is kind of in the same boat and runs 10h 30min. Granted that a big chunk of both runs along the Hudson ...


8

Assuming you have a debit card on the Cirrus network, you should be able to get Canadian cash very easily. You should know we have two kinds of ATMs - those associated with a bank and the so-called "White label" ones that are typically in convenience stores and hotel lobbies and charge a much higher fee. The machine will tell you the fee as part of the ...


8

I wouldn't say it's a faux pas though perhaps a small minority of people there might regard it as such. But since you know some French, I highly recommend you practice it and switch to English at the point you feel your French won't hold up well enough to further the conversation. I do this wherever I travel, starting with "hello" in the language then ...


7

Yup, with 12 hours it's very feasible and I would definitely go for it. In order: Yes, there is a "cloakroom" outside arrivals, rates $2-6/day depending on bag size. However, why not just check in your bags for your next flight immediately, and only then set off to explore? The easy public transport option is the direct 747 bus, $9 return including ...


7

Toronto is the most "typical" Canadian city. It's big (with over 15% of Canada's people), and broadly representative of the country. As an English-speaking American, I found Montreal to be interesting, because of the interaction between English and French. Of the three, it is most reminiscent of Switzerland, which judging from the question, is not the best ...


7

What you are doing is fine and common practice. Most people here, including myself who has been living in Montreal 15 years, just keep going with the language being spoken. So, if you switch to English, most staff will follow in English too. If they cannot, which does happen from time to time, they will respond back in French. Just keep the conversation slow ...


7

Firstly, the lesson for next time - if you've got something important, especially if it's small like documents, then always carry it onto the plane with you rather than putting it in your checked luggage. There is always the possibility of bags being lost, and taking it in your carry-on is always the safer option. As far as getting your bag back, there is ...


7

While there are many dedicated and local sites that you can find for concert listings, I find that Last.fm's Events section usually has everything. Especially for large cities like New York, Toronto, and Montreal it will definitely cover everything, no matter how esoteric your music tastes are. And if you 'scrobble' your listening to Last.fm, it can even ...


7

Remember that Québec is a French-speaking province and that the French language is the official language (even if the government offer most/all services in english). Businesses (retail/bar/restaurants) have no obligation to do business in other language than French, on the other hand, most of those places will serve you in English. If your French is not "...


7

According to city archives, Montreal built 23 public baths around the turn of the century. Most of these are located in the east and southeast which were traditionally industrial areas with a real need for a public hygiene system. I couldn't find all of them, a few are abandoned and many have been repurposed. The ones that now serve a different function can ...


7

Yes. This is done commonly. When entering Montreal, they will ask you how long will yo stay. Just say 11 hours (or so) and, if asked, show them your onward boarding pass. There is nothing that requires a minimum duration or prior planning to use the eTA. Be sure to leave enough time to come back ahead of your flight since you will have to pass security again....


7

YMQ is the code for all Montréal airports (Trudeau and Mirabel), YUL for Trudeau Airport.


6

On the assumption that you are studying in Toronto and therefore have the appropriate visa for Canada no you do not also need a transit visa to pass through Montreal. Transit visas are for when you land in a country en route to a different country. Toronto and Montreal are in the same country. You will clear Canadian immigration in Montreal, where they ...


5

As a bachelor party this would probably be.... I am not sure but let me get some stuff out there to see if this will work. There was nothing much in Quebec from the Heritage Canada Foundation but one was of interest: Maison Historique George-Etienne Cartier There is a whole bunch of festivals, but I don't know which ones you will be able to make or be ...


5

Vancouver-Montreal is a domestic flight. Thus, you will pass immigration as you arrive in Vancouver, after which you are inside Canada. You can then move within Canada however you want, you can even ditch your plane ticket and decide to walk to Montreal (not recommended). As you don't want to live in fear of missing the connection, I suggest you meet your ...


5

There are Greyhound buses leaving Montreal at 21:00 and 00:00 every night of the week, arriving Ottawa at 23:30 and 2:50 respectively.


5

Not completely. Most of the street is non-stopping. Part of it is not paid because it is reserved for those with a residence permit. There may be a few free spots in between but those are rather limited around the Montreal downtown area. There is also a moment, usually an hour or so, some days when parking is not allowed along the whole street, so you cannot ...


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