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54

This note belongs to the 8th series of banknotes. They are no longer legal tender, so banks do not have to accept them. The eighth banknote series was issued between 1995 and 1998. These banknotes were recalled as of 30 April 2021 and are thus no longer legal tender. They can be exchanged for an unlimited period of time at the Swiss National Bank at full ...


34

Cash must be declared even within Schengen countries. No fee is due on declared cash. That's your own money! You must call a customs officer at the departure airport and ask to declare money for >10000€ in cash. The reason is fighting money laundering and tax evasion. The declaration form contains your personal identification data, and your EU individual ...


30

Most schools will let you know how much money to give for the trip. Most of the time they will also tell how, cash, card or other methods. How much depends on what the kids have to pay, how much you allow as extra money and you will likely adjust the method to the amount. If it is just a small amount, for some souvenirs and the odd snack, cash in euros is ...


28

It really depends and even Booking.com does not know which is why they use the word may. Generally speaking there are additional fees that they either cannot collect or cannot calculate due to complex rules that need more information than provided. Sometimes there are no additional fees at all but often there is something charged by the locality. From the ...


27

There seem to be two different things asked here. The question title is just, "Traveling to Switzerland from the US with a layover in the Netherlands, what is the maximum amount of currency I may carry with me?" The answer to that is: "As much as you want as long as you make the appropriate declarations in each country." There isn't a ...


25

The 8th series bills are no longer legal tender as other answers have said. They are still accepted by federal public institutions for payment (SBB/CFF/FFS and post offices) until October 30, 2021. Many if not all banks offer to exchange or deposit the bills for their clients. The central bank, Swiss National Bank, will exchange recalled bills, without fee ...


23

ATMs in Italy (and elsewhere in Europe) typically permit you to change the interface language to English. So there is no need for knowledge of Italian banking terms. Some ATMs even do this automatically if they detect a card issued by an English bank. So the first step is to get the menus in English. However, in my experience checking your balance from an ...


22

In France, I don't think anyone is refusing cash (for most day-to-day payments that wouldn't be legal if you have the exact amount), there's just been a strong incentive in many places (but not all) to use contactless (with the payment limit raised to 50 euros). Apparently card usage rates have increased and cash usage rates gone down, which only accelerated ...


22

In the UK many places are restricting or discouraging the use of cash. I still carry enough to get me home and/or buy a few essentials, but I've used cash less than once a month in the last year (down from a few times per week, though much of the difference is decreased opportunities to spend at all) Some shops say "cards only". Larger ...


19

As booking.com states, requirements made directly to the hotel, like extra beds, cots for babies or pets allowed at extra pay, will be charged by the hotel. Those are charges you should know about as you requested them or agreed to them. Tourist tax is also to be paid directly to the hotel but is often already mentioned on the booking page. An extra charge ...


19

One way is by using currency-sniffing dogs who are trained to detect the odor of currency. They could deploy such dogs in international departure areas, and search passengers or their luggage if the dog alerts. CBP acknowledges that they employ currency-sniffing dogs (near the bottom of the page), and reports on a case at a land border crossing where a dog ...


18

Note that, in addition to the rules for entering Switzerland and transiting the EU as discussed in other answers, anybody departing the US with more than USD 10,000 of "currency or other negotiable instruments" is supposed to fill out FinCEN Form 105 before leaving. You can do this online, 72 hours or less before your departure.


16

Send yourself some money via Western Union - they exist in both the UK and Austria, you can send money from your UK bank account account and pick it up in Austria at a WU location. Once the transfer is set up, it should be fairly quick.


10

This has come up before, but I can't find the question. In UK, a move towards a cashless society was happening before the Covid-19 outbreak, which has only accelerated it. Many young people here no longer even carry cash. A coffee – tap the card, only the vendors with a poor fixed-fee per transaction deal don't like such small amounts. Many people, including ...


10

Switzerland does not require you to declare at the border. But they may check and if you have more than 10000,- CHF on you will ask you where you have to money from, so you should be prepared to prove that you obtained it legally. https://www.ezv.admin.ch/ezv/en/home/information-individuals/bans--restrictions-and-authorisations/cash--foreign-currencies--...


9

Since you seem to be travelling entirely within the EU you will need to check with the customs offices of the countries you leave, pass through and enter what the arrangements are, since this hasn't been fully harmonised. As you state in the question, it's likely (but not absolutely guaranteed) that you'll need to fill in a national declaration form, but ...


8

In most european countries, both cards and cash are widely accepted. However, "cards" means bank cards, not credit cards. Many smaller shops do not accept credit cards. So unless you can provide a european bank card (Girocard, EC-Card), cash is your best option. France is not one of the few countries where cash is going away, though the Corona ...


8

Advice from inside Switzerland for those who want to save a trip to a bank if you don't have "enough" to make it worthwhile to go get "rid" of. I had around 300 worth of CHF in 10s and 20s and noticed that old notes are accepted by parking and ticket machines, so if you are a train commuter that's where I would offload them. Also, I paid ...


8

Many countries have random spot checks in the departures area. I’ve already seen that in the UK boarding a flight to Las Vegas, for instance. They did ask everybody boarding but I don’t remember if they actually performed any searches, though. They probably base their decision to search on the reaction of the people. Depending on the bills used, if a large ...


7

In Dublin you should have no problem paying with cash. Lots of places will have signs indicating they would prefer you to use contactless payment methods but I have not come across any that don't accept cash at all. This doesn't mean they don't exist but if they do they will have signs to indicate this and you should have no problem finding an alternative ...


7

No problem to ask, and you will get reasonable amounts with no problem. Five one-pound coins is quite reasonable.


7

You need to file a declaration in Amsterdam. Relevant example from belastingdienst.nl Example: flight from Tokyo to Paris via Amsterdam You are flying from Tokyo (Japan) to Paris (France) via Amsterdam (the Netherlands). You arrive in the European Union in the Netherlands. If you leave the flight in Amsterdam (the Netherlands) (transfer), you will have to ...


6

(This answer only considers the question at the point of transfer in Amsterdam, it does not consider whether declarations are necessary when departing from the US or upon arrival in Switzerland.) Your hand luggage may pass customs in Amsterdam. Specifically, this page on the European Commission's website explains the case (minus the Switzerland complication ...


6

In Berlin, you will find that businesses which can accept contactless payments (mostly medium-size to large businesses) are encouraging you to use them, but businesses which previously didn't accept card payments (e.g. small döner stands) still don't accept them now.


5

So I have been to a few school trips in foreign countries (Tho only one with a foreign currency) and my school always advised our parents to give us cash. Its easier to spot how much one has left and many smaller stores or bakeries don't accept credit card in Europe. For the amount: I was given 100 pounds for 6 1/2 days in Great Britain about 7 years ago.


5

In addition to WesternUnion suggested above: 1. If you can wait around 9 working days for a card delivery and/or want to move money regularly, you could consider ordering a Revolut card. It's a VISA physical card that you can top up using your UK bank account, or debit card or credit card for free. Once you have the physical card delivered, you can use any ...


5

You have recieved other good answers on how to buy the tickets. Regarding cash it is up to the place where you want to purchase something to choose what forms of payments they accept and if you do not want to or can not pay in that way you will need to go elsewhere. Not all places will take cash, not all places will accept all cards (few take Diners for ...


5

That's an eighth series banknote, which was replaced by the ninth series only in September 2019, so yes, it's legal tender and would be widely accepted in Switzerland as of 30 April 2021, they're no longer legal tender! https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banknotes_of_the_Swiss_franc I would suggest trying another bank or money changer in Poland, although you may ...


5

Thanks to all, This is the answer to my question from swiss bank: Dear XXXXXXX The Swiss National Bank was recalling its eighth-series banknotes as of 30 April 2021. From this date on, the banknotes from the eighth series lose their status as legal tender and can no longer be used for payment purposes. This does not apply to the public cash offices of the ...


5

IANAL and it is best for you to confirm with a lawyer since this answer is not legal advice. Yes and no. You are indeed allowed to bring a large amount of cash and you are obliged to disclose it. Doing so is therefore legal but the reason they ask to disclose large amounts of cash coming into the country is that this is often related to suspicious activity. ...


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