Hot answers tagged

84

Use an app. Virtually everywhere these days has either Uber/ Lyft/ Grab/ Gojek/ Ola/ Didi/ Yandex/ Careem /local clone ride-sharing service, or an app put out by local taxi companies in an attempt to compete. In Istanbul, at time of writing Uber is in a weird not-quite-legal-or-illegal state, but BiTaksi seems to be the app of choice: http://www.bitaksi.com/...


82

It's a really bad idea, so much that I registered just to warn you (I live in Venezuela). When there was a severe shortage of cash the government blamed it on banknotes being extracted through the Colombian border for sale at a profit and "hoarding". Arrests were highly publicized, which additionally helped support the conspiracy theory of an "economic war" ...


70

The threshold can't be determined to a particular number, because so much of it depends on your facts and circumstances, and what you show (and tell) CBP. And it's worse than that. It casts shade on the purpose for your visit, risking a refusal. What I'm about to say is unfair. For many of our HNQ visitors, it's shocking that the 4th and 5th Amendments ...


58

It is perfectly normal to accept or reject the receipt if that is asked. It is slightly impolite to reject a receipt if it has been printed and handed out, since this slows the checkout line for everybody and since the sales clerk may not have a waste basket nearby. The shop is always required to keep records for tax purposes. Generally that means printing ...


45

I'm sorry to hear this, and hope you find a way to rebuild in Nigeria. The UK government has a scheme to help in just this situation: see https://www.gov.uk/return-home-voluntarily Even if you think you do not meet the criteria on the website, I strongly suggest getting in contact with them, as they likely have some degree of discretion. Buying you a plane ...


44

I second the comment by B.Liu. Make really sure this is not a scam. I once used Western Union to send money to a relative abroad. They are still in business and so are several other providers. (Andrew mentioned Moneygram in his comment. I'm not suggesting a specific provider based on my limited transactions. Check their websites and FAQs.) Your friend ...


43

Is it acceptable / customary / expected / normal to walk into a random bank office and ask for such change? Is there a fee for the change? It is acceptable. Some banks may be more accommodating than others. I would expect smaller banks and those that emphasize customer service to be among the former. Larger commercial banks are more likely to be among ...


36

If you're staying at a hotel, you could ask at the front desk. Cash is still common enough in the USA that I would expect that most hotels would have enough cash on hand to accommodate you. While I would be surprised if a "nice" hotel were unable to do this, I should say that I have never actually tried it myself.


36

It's absolutely in Ordnung. If you don't need it, you don't take it, as many people in Germany do.


33

Yes. Source (IATA): Currency Currency Import regulations: Local currency (Bolivar Soberano-VES) and foreign currencies: no restrictions Currency Export regulations: Local currency (Bolivar Soberano-VES) and foreign currencies: no restrictions (Though, given Venezuela's current situation, who knows what will happen in practice if they ...


30

Travelling without a credit in the US is difficult. It's almost impossible to rent a car. Some hotels will try to work with you, others will not. You may have to put down substantial amounts of cash as deposit. Many providers will simply refuse service. For example: there is a simple food truck outside of Boston's South Station that takes card only: no card?...


29

This is actually based on my mother's experience, and not my own. Yes, this is a common scam. Despite some answers wanting to be generous and say it's possibly accidental, much of the time it is not. If I remember correctly, she told me the way she got around it was by telling the drivers exactly what route she wanted them to take. Even then they would try ...


27

MastaBaba's answer addressed the legality of exporting currency. This answer deals with importing currency. Most times you have to declare currency that you are bringing in. The limits vary. The USA says you have to declare more than the equivalent of US$10,000, for example. The first problem is that a border agent seeing your suitcase of cash won’t know ...


26

I realize this is an open-ended question, and there is no precise threshhold -- that much depends on the authorities I come in contact with. But can someone give me some idea of where the effective boundary is? Your question cannot be answered, as the way you've asked it implies. Because there is no precise threshold, and because it depends on specifically ...


24

Firstly, not all cards have foreign transaction fees. Most cards nowadays that are fancy enough to have annual fees wouldn't have foreign transaction fees. Also check your debit card. Otherwise, your best bet is to withdraw money from an ATM in the DR. Out-of-network ATM fees are typically flat, so if you withdraw all the cash you need at once, it'll only ...


20

In my experience, 200 kr bills are not at all unusual and shouldn't give you any issues (unless you're buying something very cheap, like less than 20 kr, from a very small store). The 500 kr bill is more unusual, but it should be fine in larger stores and restaurants. Some smaller stores and restaurants may refuse them.


20

HKD is usually accepted in Macau but any change which you might get would be in the Macanese currency. Macanese Pataca, on the other hand, isn't accepted in Hong Kong. This is based on my personal experience and experience of the people I know. YMMV


19

There is no 'safe' limit. The amount you can safely carry is the amount that you are prepared to lose.


18

A better rule of thumb is to not exchange any cash at all, but use an ATM in the country of arrival to withdraw money, letting your home bank do the currency conversion (so withdraw in HKD, not in EUR; the ATM itself will offer Direct Currency Conversion but that's usually a much worse rate for you). It's also quite logical; HKD banknotes in the Euro zone ...


18

I'm sorry to hear about your troubles. This answer has a list of how long bans last. Two of the options are: "if they left the UK voluntarily, not at public expense" (I have reworded slightly), and "if they left UK voluntarily, at public expense". Hence it is clearly possible to get the Home Office to pay for your return flight. I suggest you get in ...


18

When you check-in, a card is usually requested, which will be used as a guarantee for incidentals, but also in some cases for the cost of the hotel itself (unless you paid at tile of booking, of course). Some hotels will simply not accept anything else. Others will just block any incidentals on your room. That may include locking the mini-bar if there is ...


17

If you aren't using a ride-sharing or taxi app, as suggested by jpatokal, use a different app: a mapping app. Enter your destination (make sure it's correct), show the map to the driver and ensure he/she has a shared understanding of where you want to go, and keep an eye on the route. If the driver has a GPS, ask that they use it. Keep in mind that there may ...


16

Not a complete answer, I admit. The advice I was given when visiting Istanbul is that taxi drivers often appear not to be able to read - and to be prepared for that. The advice was to give them both a printout of the address and also a simplified map, showing them which roads I expect them to take to my hotel. That the driver couldn't read could be a ...


14

Credit and debit cards are ubiquitous in Scandinavia. You should have no trouble using a Visa card. Before you travel, you could apply for a credit card that has zero foreign transactions fee. You can also take out money from an ATM, like almost anywhere else in the world. Some banks' ATM cards refund ATM fees. Purchases in a foreign currency are no ...


13

First off, let's differentiate the two Civil Asset Forfeitures(CAFs): Police - This tends to be focused on people committing (or merely suspected of committing) smaller crimes (i.e you had illegal drugs on you) and having assets seized. The US Supreme Court recently limited actions like this, but they still occur with some frequency. Most of the CAF ...


13

SHENZEN (CN) In Shenzen almost always not - especially if you get further away from the border area. you might get lucky with some random person or HK owner of some venue - but don't count on it. ( Sidenote - It is also illegal in China as far as I know to pay / accept in other currencies other then CNY except business that have special permit which is ...


12

It would be good to check with your bank. Their policies vary greatly. Some seem to accept charges for anything, anywhere. Others may block charges which seem suspicious. I doubt that using a Canadian card in the US would be regarded as suspicious but it would not hurt to check. Your bank will convert the USD charges to CAD and add a transaction ...


12

HKD in Shenzhen is basically a no go. You may find the occasional person or merchant to take HKD, but the exchange rate will be atrocious. You will be much better off getting cash from an ATM.


11

Venezuela has a multi-tier exchange rate. According to xe.com the official exchange rate is 9.9875 VEF/USD as of May 2017. The black market rate is approximately 80,000 VEF/USD so anything over a US dollar or two at the black market rate will exceed $10K USD at the official rate. So better to proactively declare the currency at customs on entry unless the ...


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