Hot answers tagged

71

Rarely does one see so many misconceptions in one question! coach will definitely or almost certainly be stopped in Switzerland for checks on luggage and things, can I risk being seized all my money by Swiss authorities or will I have to give them something? ... I've been told that Swiss authorities are quite ruthless. ... but even ...


61

The currency of Switzerland is obviously the Swiss Franc, not the Euro. Many businesses accept euros, but: not all do to make sure they're covered against fluctuations of the exchange rate, they will add a "spread" on the exchange rate in their favour, sometimes quite extreme. For instance, even though 1 EUR is about 1.10 CHF at this time, they may very ...


51

What you've described is the case for all insurance. If the expected value of the insurance policy for the average buyer costs more than the premium, the insurance company will eventualy go out of business because they're paying out more in claims than they collect. All insurance, on average (as phoog notes, if you know your own risk is higher than average ...


50

"Why should you have travel insurance?" - because the insurance company makes money from it. That is their reason to offer it. What is your reason to have insurances? If you have the need to cover your potential loss because it's catastrophic for your personal situation. You definitely should cover your house with insurance, because if it burns down, you ...


48

There's a few places where you may encounter difficulties: Lots of people expect tips in hotel, especially bellhops (the people who will carry your luggage to your room or into your car). I'm not sure about valets (those who park your car for you), I don't drive. Having a small quantity of one-dollar bills is always useful for those cases. In most other ...


47

My advice for anyone who wants to get out of a difficult situation is to not get in that situation in the first place. In this case, the easiest way would be to take a second debit card, or a credit card, with you. But in case you're already abroad and are stuck with a single broken card, you could ask the hotel if it's possible to pay by bank transfer (...


43

It's always a good idea to have at least two completely different and separate cards if you are travelling far from home: Some issuers will overzealously block your card "for security reasons" as soon as you hit a foreign country, and it may take a little while to get them to unblock it (just due to matters of timezone differences and limited customer ...


38

I decided to give my contribution here as I'm often crossing the border between Italy and Switzerland by train and sometimes by bus: Border inspections both from Swiss and Italians authorities are very common (I would say between 50 and 70 per cent of the times); the typical question is whether you are carrying cash, valuables and securities, and they ...


32

Both Visa and MasterCard offer worldwide card replacement services for lost or damaged cards. There may have a fee attached, which will probably be taken from your bank account but as far as I can tell Visa will get a replacement card to you pretty much anywhere in the world within a couple of days and I assume MasterCard would be similar. Its literally part ...


31

This has happened to me multiple times with local cards as well so I doubt they target foreign cards. Every time the police have helped me rather swiftly, provided me with a copy of the case registered which I took to the bank who then changed the money for me without delay at all. But yes dealing with Chinese police can be frustrating and take a long ...


24

Sign up for Google Pay / Apple Pay and add your credit/debit cards to it. You can then make contactless payments with those cards using your phone. Open the app and then touch your phone to the payment terminal. This works if your debit card is Visa Debit / Debit MasterCard, but not for Visa Electron / V Pay / Maestro. This will not allow you to get cash, ...


24

The note in the image is definitely not genuine. Taking it to a bank would be a waste of time. Federal reserve notes are printed entirely in green and black. There should be no red. United States notes were printed with red seals, but the design was rather different, and they of course did not bear the title "Federal Reserve Note." The letter in the ...


20

HKD is usually accepted in Macau but any change which you might get would be in the Macanese currency. Macanese Pataca, on the other hand, isn't accepted in Hong Kong. This is based on my personal experience and experience of the people I know. YMMV


19

Almost. I also live cashless at home but usually bring some cash while travelling, either exchanged before hand or via an ATM if needed. For the US, it is mostly easy to pull with two exceptions: As @jcaron mentioned: Tips. Cash tips are often expected for help that has no other transaction. For tips with a transaction, you can usually add the amount on ...


17

Doesn't it make sense to, instead of buying travel insurance, just save the money you would otherwise pay for it and when something happens to you, pay it from this saved money? Frequently, yes, but as other answers note, some of the things you might have to pay for can cost more than you probably can save. Medical evacuation can cost more than most people ...


16

It is always less expensive to use a country's own currency when in that country. Merchants lose money on conversion fees when they accept payment in foreign currency, and they typically cover that by using a less favorable exchange rate to figure the foreign-currency price than you will find in the banking system.


15

I'd go to the store Pressbyrån and get a prepaid debit card to use during the stay. Using cash will be hard, many places don't accept cash. It will also be much more expensive. If you only want to use cash you will have to plan your trip very well so that you know what places accept cash. Getting tickets for public transportation during the evening and ...


15

Is it possible to travel the country (by public transportation) as tourist (including Stockholm, Gothenburg) WITHOUT a credit and debit card (and no app as well) In Stockholm it is possible. You will need to purchase either a single ticket, an SL card containing pay as you go credit, or an SL card containing a period ticket (24 hours, 72 hours, 3 days 7 ...


15

Some things not mentioned by others about using your credit and debit cards in the US: Maestro cards don't work for purchases. You'll only be able to use these at ATMs to get cash. If you have a Visa Debit/Debit MasterCard and you use it at a payment terminal in the US, in some cases the terminal may ask the question "Debit or Credit". Always select Credit ...


15

Take out some cash. Cash-free living may be harder for visitors than for residents, although it depends a lot on your spending pattern. As a visitor, your spending pattern is different than as a resident, and you might do some things that some residents who have lived cash-free for years rarely or never do. You may need more cash more frequently than a ...


14

Credit and debit cards are ubiquitous in Scandinavia. You should have no trouble using a Visa card. Before you travel, you could apply for a credit card that has zero foreign transactions fee. You can also take out money from an ATM, like almost anywhere else in the world. Some banks' ATM cards refund ATM fees. Purchases in a foreign currency are no ...


14

Your math is correct, but only makes sense on a large scale. Let's take an even simpler example. Assume the chances of you falling sick on a given trip is 1%, and the medical and transportation costs incurred in case of sickness are $10,000. Furthermore, assume the insurance premium is $150 per trip. If you took 1,000 trips and fell sick on 10 of them, it ...


14

Always carry at least 2 cards, if not more! I had my main card blocked many times while traveling. As @jcaron explained, it's common for card issuers to block your card as soon as you make a transaction in a new country. Then you need to get in touch with your bank to have it unblocked, which can be difficult if you're traveling to a country where you don't ...


13

SHENZEN (CN) In Shenzen almost always not - especially if you get further away from the border area. you might get lucky with some random person or HK owner of some venue - but don't count on it. ( Sidenote - It is also illegal in China as far as I know to pay / accept in other currencies other then CNY except business that have special permit which is ...


13

Swiss authorities are not known to be especially concerned about large amounts of money. Travelling by bus adds another layer to this story, I assume customs officers are more familiar with Western European businessmen bringing cash than bus passengers carrying their savings and I have no idea how they might react to this situation. Note that unlike (most) ...


13

You need travel insurance because otherwise you'd have to save a lot. I don't know which country you're from where a broken leg requiring a helicopter trip sets you back only $5'000. In US, a broken leg in need of a surgery will cost $15'000 to $35'000, and air ambulance services may cost about as much, or even more. Frostbite treatment is not cheap either, ...


13

There are several possible causes for the cards not working: The card issuers refused the transactions. This can be due to a multitude of factors: Transactions abroad triggered security blocks. Note that such blocks may not happen on the first transaction abroad or in a given country, they may happen after a specific type of transaction (e.g. ATM ...


12

HKD in Shenzhen is basically a no go. You may find the occasional person or merchant to take HKD, but the exchange rate will be atrocious. You will be much better off getting cash from an ATM.


12

Clone your debit card to Google Pay, Apple Pay or other country specific app installed on your NFC-enabled phone. It is really unlikely that your card and phone breaks the same time. (As Michael Hampton already answered). My second choice would be: At the hotel reception: cancel your reservation. Make an online booking on the spot with 100% prepayment ...


12

Western Union is probably the most straightforward. Something very similar happened me last year. Was on holidays in the Canaries, lost my wallet and had stupidly brought out both my ATM card and my credit card. Rang my bank cancelled the cards but they had no local associated banks. Thought I had emergency cash cover on my travel insurance but couldn't get ...


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