Hot answers tagged

48

There's a few places where you may encounter difficulties: Lots of people expect tips in hotel, especially bellhops (the people who will carry your luggage to your room or into your car). I'm not sure about valets (those who park your car for you), I don't drive. Having a small quantity of one-dollar bills is always useful for those cases. In most other ...


43

It's always a good idea to have at least two completely different and separate cards if you are travelling far from home: Some issuers will overzealously block your card "for security reasons" as soon as you hit a foreign country, and it may take a little while to get them to unblock it (just due to matters of timezone differences and limited customer ...


34

Cash must be declared even within Schengen countries. No fee is due on declared cash. That's your own money! You must call a customs officer at the departure airport and ask to declare money for >10000€ in cash. The reason is fighting money laundering and tax evasion. The declaration form contains your personal identification data, and your EU individual ...


28

It really depends and even Booking.com does not know which is why they use the word may. Generally speaking there are additional fees that they either cannot collect or cannot calculate due to complex rules that need more information than provided. Sometimes there are no additional fees at all but often there is something charged by the locality. From the ...


24

The note in the image is definitely not genuine. Taking it to a bank would be a waste of time. Federal reserve notes are printed entirely in green and black. There should be no red. United States notes were printed with red seals, but the design was rather different, and they of course did not bear the title "Federal Reserve Note." The letter in the ...


19

Almost. I also live cashless at home but usually bring some cash while travelling, either exchanged before hand or via an ATM if needed. For the US, it is mostly easy to pull with two exceptions: As @jcaron mentioned: Tips. Cash tips are often expected for help that has no other transaction. For tips with a transaction, you can usually add the amount on ...


19

As booking.com states, requirements made directly to the hotel, like extra beds, cots for babies or pets allowed at extra pay, will be charged by the hotel. Those are charges you should know about as you requested them or agreed to them. Tourist tax is also to be paid directly to the hotel but is often already mentioned on the booking page. An extra charge ...


16

Is it possible to travel the country (by public transportation) as tourist (including Stockholm, Gothenburg) WITHOUT a credit and debit card (and no app as well) In Stockholm it is possible. You will need to purchase either a single ticket, an SL card containing pay as you go credit, or an SL card containing a period ticket (24 hours, 72 hours, 3 days 7 ...


16

I'd go to the store Pressbyrån and get a prepaid debit card to use during the stay. Using cash will be hard, many places don't accept cash. It will also be much more expensive. If you only want to use cash you will have to plan your trip very well so that you know what places accept cash. Getting tickets for public transportation during the evening and ...


16

Send yourself some money via Western Union - they exist in both the UK and Austria, you can send money from your UK bank account account and pick it up in Austria at a WU location. Once the transfer is set up, it should be fairly quick.


15

Some things not mentioned by others about using your credit and debit cards in the US: Maestro cards don't work for purchases. You'll only be able to use these at ATMs to get cash. If you have a Visa Debit/Debit MasterCard and you use it at a payment terminal in the US, in some cases the terminal may ask the question "Debit or Credit". Always select Credit ...


15

Take out some cash. Cash-free living may be harder for visitors than for residents, although it depends a lot on your spending pattern. As a visitor, your spending pattern is different than as a resident, and you might do some things that some residents who have lived cash-free for years rarely or never do. You may need more cash more frequently than a ...


14

Always carry at least 2 cards, if not more! I had my main card blocked many times while traveling. As @jcaron explained, it's common for card issuers to block your card as soon as you make a transaction in a new country. Then you need to get in touch with your bank to have it unblocked, which can be difficult if you're traveling to a country where you don't ...


13

There are several possible causes for the cards not working: The card issuers refused the transactions. This can be due to a multitude of factors: Transactions abroad triggered security blocks. Note that such blocks may not happen on the first transaction abroad or in a given country, they may happen after a specific type of transaction (e.g. ATM ...


13

Since your card was issued in the US, your card operates under US law. Federal law specifies, at 15 USC 1666(b)(3), that a credit card borrower ("obligor") may dispute a charge for goods or services not received: (b) Billing error For the purpose of this section, a “billing error” consists of any of the following: ... (3) A reflection on a ...


12

A lot of people here from Americans. We don't use ATM cards in Sweden; we use Visa/Mastercard (Credit or Debit), with youths offered Maestro instead. There is one thing they have not mentioned that affects some of us Swedes (myself included). If you have any special letters in your name, you might not be able to pay with your card in some stores. My surname ...


9

Since you seem to be travelling entirely within the EU you will need to check with the customs offices of the countries you leave, pass through and enter what the arrangements are, since this hasn't been fully harmonised. As you state in the question, it's likely (but not absolutely guaranteed) that you'll need to fill in a national declaration form, but ...


8

Deposits for hotel rooms and rental cars are much easier with a credit card, and some may not accept anything else than a credit card. Check before you go. https://travel-dealz.eu/blog/book-hotel-without-credit-card/ Prepaid usually won't work offline. It have happened to me twice in two-three years that the merchant's terminal didn't have any contact with ...


8

With respect to Tor-Einar's more general answer, the position is a little more comfortable in the UK. I accept that the OP isn't there, but we're here for everyone, surely? Section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act 1974 provides that the card issuer is jointly and severally liable to the card holder for claims in respect of misrepresentation or breach of ...


7

Genuine US currency is always usable -- no US bill or coin has ever been de-monitized. You may have trouble getting a business to accept older bills because of the absence of anti-counterfeiting measures, but banks should be willing to accept them. For exceptionally old money, you may be able to find a collector who will pay considerably over face value ...


6

Aside from hotel tipping, and a small number of government-driven fees (like park entrance fees), you can live in the US without cash. Although I typically carry about 25 $ in cash, just for emergencies, it turns out to be the same bills since years, as I never need them.


5

In answer to your actual specific question, I am not from Italy but I have frequently travelled to India from Europe, both short and long trips I have never used, or taken, a credit card to India. Only debit cards. Some thoughts, It's incredibly unlikely you'll be renting a car there. India is super-high-tech and mobile-oriented, so I've never had any ...


5

You have recieved other good answers on how to buy the tickets. Regarding cash it is up to the place where you want to purchase something to choose what forms of payments they accept and if you do not want to or can not pay in that way you will need to go elsewhere. Not all places will take cash, not all places will accept all cards (few take Diners for ...


5

Late last year we spent two weeks on a roadtrip through FL and in San Francisco, from that experience I'd say you can live cashless 98% of the time. The only time we needed cash was: tip in the hotel one "hipster" restaurant booking the airport express in SF One important note I'm missing in this thread: Your VISA may be capped at a max no. of ...


5

Locally: Public transit is cash only (unless you have a weekly or monthly pass), exact change required. Taxis take credit cards but charge you an extra $3 to do so. The closest national park accepts cards but the link is poor enough that they have a sign up about cash being faster. In the not too distant past I have seen cash only signs at some park ...


5

In addition to WesternUnion suggested above: 1. If you can wait around 9 working days for a card delivery and/or want to move money regularly, you could consider ordering a Revolut card. It's a VISA physical card that you can top up using your UK bank account, or debit card or credit card for free. Once you have the physical card delivered, you can use any ...


4

In most establishments this is perfectly acceptable and is increasingly so. Some "mom and pop" style restaurants may still be cash only, but that seems to be fewer and fewer. If you are gambling in a casino they typically prefer cash. Rental car and hotels tend to prefer credit. With the advent of square and fast mobile internet the barrier for ...


4

Your daughter should be a savvy customer. Background: America has unique subclass of people called "the unbanked". They cannot open bank accounts because they are present in the country illegally, or had past overdrafts. Many US financial services cater to the unbanked, and the fees/charges are positively usurious. Separately, many of the ...


4

As of 2020 November the ATMs located at MRT stations around Taipei provided by Cathay United Bank appear to now charge 4% fee of the entire transaction. So $20 to receive $500 plus any fees from the source bank (without specifying any exchange considerations). This is quite unexpected and new within the past 30 days. FamilyMart ATMs currently have a more ...


4

As a hotel owner our prices vary all the time depending on demand it’s supply and demand if the rooms are empty it’s better to sell them at a lower price than to have them sitting empty similarly if there’s high demand prices will be higher. Pre paid reservations with a deposit can cancel rooms booked for a lower rate if they become available but they loose ...


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