Hot answers tagged

46

Surprisingly, it appears that the answer is YES, Google Maps does make a distinction between uphill and downhill. I routed out a couple of bicycle rides from my home (in Germany) to a city either 90 km away (with a 700 m climb) or 60 km away (with a 1000 m climb), depending on the route taken. I then reversed both routes. In both cases, Google Maps shows ...


42

The ocean floor. Any other unexplored spots pale in comparison with about 75% of the planet's surface covered by oceans, of which hardly anything deeper than 100m has been meaningfully explored. There are literally millions of square kilometers about which we know nothing except a very coarse-grained depth profile. There could be a hundred sunken Atlantises ...


34

That is the International Date Line. It's roughly on the 180 meridian. It would, as you can imagine, be very challenging for different sides of an island to be on different days, so it originally jiggled around islands. The 180 meridian crosses land in just three places: very far north, very far south, and the island of Taveuni in Fiji. (My blog entry ...


33

No. Google Maps works a different way. Google Maps learns travel times by monitoring the pace of other riders. The Google Maps app "constantly" sends data about your location back to the Google servers. It knows you're on a bike, not driving, because you requested a bike route, and because your travel time is not an outlier from other people doing the ...


32

There are some things you have to be aware of. For example, you might think that it's enough to turn your GPS on, start your app, and see your position, as simply as that. Well, not really! First of all, the plane shields from radio waves, so you are almost always forced to keep the phone next to (even against) the window to get your first fix. The farther ...


31

I did some testing and it seems to be the time of the start and ending points you provided. I chose a route which passes a time border (between Spain and Portugal) and this is what I get: As you can see it takes into account the time zones, as the arrival time is actually before the departure time (because it's offset by the time difference). Just to ...


31

As you've mentioned in your question, online searches work best when you know the name of the store you're looking for, or what kind of store is likely to carry your item. I recommend instead you talk to a person. If you're staying at or near a hotel, hotel staff are your first choice. The front desk, for example. These people probably live nearby, or are ...


30

Update: following comments I asked a friend who lives nearby to get up-to-date information. He took a picture of the actual Barnwell junction, which shows that @DavidRicherby and I are both right: the actual rail junction can no longer be used, but the rails and the points/switch and their actuation mechanism at the junction still exist. He looked through ...


27

This happens in a number of places, due to the way European Routes are numbered. They're more of a concept than an actual road, and as such, they're often disconnected. For example the E20 consists of several segments that would not normally be considered a "road": a ferry between Dublin(IE) and Liverpool(UK) a gap between Hull(UK) and Esbjerg(DK) another ...


26

Roads, pretty much by definition, are mapped somewhere. In northern Ontario there are "logging roads" which were made by the logging companies and don't have the same legality as a road made by government (municipal or otherwise.) But if someone got out some heavy equipment and made a road, there is a map somewhere that shows it. It just might not be a ...


26

Yes! Google maps recently added the possibility of doing exactly this! I noticed it for the first time today. When you query the route for a specific destination a new option shows up above the possible routes which allows you to choose to depart at a particular time or arrive at a particular time. In the later case it suggests the time that you should ...


25

I use OsmAnd for this sort of thing. There's a base world map that's not super detailed at the city level, but is certainly more than adequate for tracking the location of any passenger flight. It's also very helpful for having an accurate, detailed map of your destination before you even figure out how to get cell service after you land.


24

I found a non-official map of the Amtrak trains that ride during the night or the day. Since daylight changes every day, the day picked for this map is the autumnal equinox. This map was published in November 2003 by Trains Magazine. Since it changes every day, if you want to know precisely where you are supposed to be (given there is no delay), you ...


21

While Google Maps may not provide offline maps for this area, OpenStreetMap has mapped Cairo pretty well. There is a large number of apps for offline maps based on OpenStreetMap. My favorite so far is Locus Map. Locus Map has different data sources, some allow downloading, some don't. "4UMaps" is one that works for Cairo. Another app I tested is MapFactor ...


21

If you have a phone, you can download the maps (offline maps in Google Maps). Often you find some tourist information with maps on airports/bus stations/train stations, but it doesn't seem your case. If you are traveling with a car, take a GPS (offline maps) or buy a road guide: much less troubles. An alternative is to go to a library, and get a guide and ...


19

Here you go: 全国鉄軌道路線図 ¥1,296 from Amazon.co.jp. Here's a blog review with some pictures of the map folded out. And yes, that's entirely in Japanese, I very much doubt such a thing exists in English. To get some idea of the effort that would entail, here's a closeup of another incomplete & partial map covering just the Tokyo metro area.


19

The most official source is the Umweltbundesamt (UBA), the Federal Environment Agency. You can use the GIS website of the UBA, which provides nice PDFs of each Umweltzone. Example: Berlin (Euro 3). There's a map of Germany as a whole as well. A less official site, but with a much broader approach, is Urban Access Regulations, which collects more classes of ...


18

Maybe the next Movile cave, which has been separated from the rest of the world for millions years, until 1986? Or some remote mountains on the south of Chile: Access is difficult and weather is not friendly. I would not be surprised if some have not been climbed yet.


18

For the mountain has not been explored yet : Gamburtsev The Gamburtsev Mountain Range (also known as the Gamburtsev Subglacial Mountains) is a subglacial mountain range located in Eastern Antarctica, near Dome A.The range was discovered by the 3rd Soviet Antarctic. It is approximately 1,200 kilometres (750 mi) long, and the mountains are believed to be ...


18

I've found (anecdotally) that initially in London, the walking times were way too slow - I was beating the times regularly. Then I moved to Vancouver and found them too fast. I'm a quick walker, so wasn't sure what was happening. I eventually figured it was down to knowledge. I 'knew' London far better, and even though I might be using a map, I could ...


18

Are there for sources in Prague that have hand-held, printed maps? Maps are easy to obtain in Prague, no matter how you come to the country. Airport: A free map is available at the airport's public transport information kiosks. Train station: The main train station likewise gives out free maps at the public transport information counters. City center: ...


17

UPDATE: TomTom now have maps for Iceland. As of their latest update, this has been added to the 'Western Europe' collection for many devices. TomTom use "TeleAtlas" maps, and in fact they actually bought TeleAtlas several years ago. As with most mapping companies, TeleAtlas has varying levels of coverage for different countries. For countries like the US,...


17

My favourite app for exactly this purpose is Maps.me. They allow you to download countries or provinces/states, depending on the area. You can add your own locations. They recently added driving and walking directions.


17

At least for bikes it does (assuming the topographical information mentioned in the comment is available). I just checked with two cycling routes near my home, both 4,2km long according to Google, one almost flat, the other with a climb towards the end (obviously going downhill the other direction). Result: 4,2km almost flat but slightly downhill: 14min ...


17

There are various third-party services offering free printable maps based on OpenStreetMap. Many of these services are listed at OSM on Paper. There you can find, among others: MyOSMatic Inkatlas Field papers and many more The quality of OSM-based maps varies between different geographic regions but can be quite impressive.


16

TravellersPoint has a great map making feature. Google MyMaps or Google Earth could also be good tools for creating a map. Google Earth in particular now supports "Tours" that you can record to show an animated path, even with narration and photos.


16

Here is a such a map. There is a legend too. Blue is essentially without limit. Some have time-based limits or flexible limits based on electronic signs.


16

I have spent about fifteen months in Japan over the last few years (mostly Kansai) and I have never found a need to use anything except Google Maps for finding out how to get anywhere. You can plot walking directions easily enough, at least in cities, and they have always been accurate when I have used them. Google Maps coverage of everything from buses, ...


16

The correct address is the one in Patra. The other one in Athens is most probably a mistake on Google Maps. Here is my reasoning: The address is basically the same - EO stands for Ethniki Odos, and the road from Patra to Korinthos is the same as the one from Athens to Korinthos Palea Ethniki Odos means Old National Road 26500 is the postcode of Rio Rio is a ...


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