10

Update: Good news, when you load the official page, you'll now see that they accept VISA payments. As a result, you can now buy advance tickets from outside of Peru directly with the website. However, there are still many other ways to do this. I'd recommend this guide for sources on how to do it. There are numerous online tour agencies that you can pay ...


10

It's actually pretty common to sleep at Cusco your first night. My brother, for example, flew from Lima to Cusco. It's not ideal and you're likely to have a headache, but it's uncommon for anything too serious. You definitely want a full day (two nights) based in Aguas Calientes if you want the full experience. The reason being if you want to be on the ...


9

The answer depends on (at least) two things. Whether you want to do the 'proper' Inca trail or one of the alternatives and what time of the year you are going. If you want to do the proper trail in high season you should book in advanced. Sometimes it is fully booked for 3 months. I was there in October (not high season) and I stayed in Cusco for two weeks ...


8

I did this two and a half years ago, and took a 75L pack and a day pack. My friend also had one, and the six others in our group also had backpacks plus odds and ends. There was no problem. However, the train was also only half full (October). I imagine the rules are there so that in the peak season, if it's busy they can then start enforcing them. So ...


7

Never seen a problem with this. I did it once with a large 80L backpack plus one camera bag weighing considerably more than 8kg and once with a rolling 26" suitcase plus an even larger camera bag. No problem in either case. Keep in mind that this is not an official rule but checks tend to be loose on trains compared to airplanes.


7

Machu Picchu itself is only around 2400 metres above sea level - well below the altitude that most people would suffer any real effects of altitude sickness, and about 1000 metres lower than Cuzco (3400 metres) where most people visit before heading to Machu Picchu. If you are planning to trek then it really depends on which path you take. The "Inca Trail" ...


6

Essentially what you're asking is covered quite extensively in "Avoiding or minimising altitude sickness". In terms of Machu Picchu, be aware that the treks are NOT easy walks. The Inca trail is a long, difficult walk. Extremely fit and active relatives and friends found it to be, and I quote "the hardest thing I've ever done in my life". You're in the ...


6

The main Inca trail has a limit of 500 people starting on it each day. This sounds like a lot, until you realise 300 of those are porters! So it's quite hard to get it. My brother had to book months in advance. However, there are several other trails. Salcantay is meant to be higher, less ruins but more scenic. I'm told the Lares trail goes along the ...


6

There is no official left-luggage facility at Poroy Station, presumably because there just isn't the demand for such "All the hotels in Cusco & the Sacred Valley will store luggage for you if you stay there either before or after your visit to Machu Picchu, with no charge". It has been possible to drop off luggage at PeruRail's free facility in ...


6

My brother flew from Lima to Cusco. It was brutal. I took time in Bolivia, Lake Titicaca and then in Cusco before heading to Machu Picchu. It was still brutal. Others have it worse, others have it less, but generally you'll be out of breath at the very least, and likely with headaches. There's basically nothing to do in Aguas Calientes - some springs and ...


5

Your itinerary is certainly doable in logistical terms, if rather tiring. So, if the altitude doesn't get you, you might still need some time to recover. Aguas Calientes is an uninteresting little tourist town, so if you were thinking of staying a few nights, there, you would be much better off staying in Cusco instead, to adapt to your surroundings. If you ...


5

From personal experience, it is not as bad as it may seem, but then again it probably depends on your health and fitness level. I am 37, my wife is 33, neither of us is very fit, but not we are not couch potatoes either. We flew from Lima (sea level) to Cusco and stayed there for 5 days. Before the trip we had similar concerns as you had, and we also had ...


4

Even if you're with a tour group, you almost all enter at the same point, and will be buying tickets at the gate. It's important to note that while there's generally a few thousand a day at Machu Picchu, they severely restrict the numbers each day for Huayana Picchu. So if you want one of those (2x200 I believe), you need to make sure you're on the first ...


4

Unless you are planning being there outside of opening hours or for a purpose other than tourism, that is not the case. When entering the reserve, you buy an entrance ticket. They are valid for one or two days. There is no need to acquire this ticket in advance, doing so at the main gate is typical. Some travel agencies, at least those in Peru, may be able ...


4

Even if your plane lands on time, it usually takes at least 20 mins to get off the plane. Then you have to exit the airport, collect your luggage and find a taxi. Assume another 20 mins minimum for the exit, a few mins for the luggage and a few more for the taxi and you are sure to miss the 6:40 train. Hopefully you are coming from Lima or another airport in ...


4

On foot, an alternative to the Inca Trail is to walk from Aguas Calientes, along the bus route. There is a checkpoint at the bridge where you have to present an entrance ticket before continuing. Walkers take the stairs that connect the switchbacks used by the buses (beware of the vehicles). Machu Picchu Trek gives an overview of options: The most ...


4

It seems to me you're worrying too much. :) If you want to see the sunrise at Machu Picchu, which is highly advised, you'll have to stay the previous night in Aguas Calientes. I would advise against staying two or more nights as the village has very little to offer. You might indeed get altitude sickness. To minimise the effects, take it easy. So, it ...


4

I'm going to answer my own questions. We were in the bus line at 4 am, the line was too long, we ride the bus until 6 am, and arrived at Machupicchu entrance at 6:30. The ticket and passport checking take like 15 min but people go to the bathroom before entering so for some people it takes more time. If somebody takes the first bus they could arrive at ...


4

You're asking a bunch of questions at the same time. The line for the bus in the morning is big as everyone wants to get up before sunrise. You can walk up, which, depending on your physical condition, does not have to take more than 45 minutes. Going down is faster. But, also, not everyone will want to leave at the same time, so taking the bus down is ...


3

You've likely found that there are an abundance of articles on treking Machu Pichu, when where what how. One site that gives both a good overview, along with very detailed weather information is Machu Pichu Trek which states that is not owned by any trekking or travel company, which allows us to provide independent and impartial information. Its summary of ...


3

Well the key thing you're missing is by foot...from where? If you're saying from Cusco, then yes, as Dorothy mentions, you have several alternative treks. However you can also get the train to Aguas Calientes, and then forgo the bus ride up the mountain in the morning and walk, if you really wish to. Although I was on the first bus of the day, and we ...


3

Most likely the tour operators aren't actually sold out as such, but the the permits are. When there are no permits available, no tour operator is going to be able to help you! Permits are indeed required for all hikers on the on the "Inca Trail", and for peak periods they often sell out months in advance as only ~200 hikers are allowed to set-out on the ...


2

Permits for the Inca Trail that see you arrive at the Machu Picchu ruins are indeed limited, but I'm quite sure that if you want to trek to Aguas Calientes, you should not have a problem finding an operator at any time. Cusco is full of operators that will happily accommodate you. You have no choice but to buy tickets in advance for Machu Picchu itself. You ...


2

This Ticket Machu Pichu site appears to allow online allows purchase of tickets for children (8-17 years old student rate), noting that you send a copy of their passport or identify document for verification. Scroll down to the note: Children between 8-17 years have student rate. Send a copy of your passport or identity document. Children under 8 are free.


1

You have a few ways to manage your luggage. First, you may be able to leave it with your hotel in Ollantaytamba and ask whether it will send it on to your hotel in Cusco. That is better done in advance of your arrival in Peru, so that you can plan ahead. Should it not offer that arrangement, ask whether it can to refer you to a service that will transfer ...


1

Ollantaytambo is better suited for hikes than Cusco. But, you can easily go for hikes around Cusco as well. The possibilities from Aguas Callientes are limited. (And, it's not a very nice town if you're not going to Machu Picchu.) In Cusco, everyone and their brother will be able and willing to get you on day tours. But, I would probably start by asking the ...


1

One can buy a permit to visit Machu Picchu on https://www.machupicchu.gob.pe/inicio For more information, see https://www.ticketmachupicchu.com/how-buy-entrance-machu-picchu-advance/#how_buy_machu_picchu_2020_ticket (mirror).


1

I would recommend you book in advance especially if you go in high season (April to September). Regardless of the route you choose you will have an unforgettable experience. Salkantay route doesn't have many archaeological sites but is offset by the beauty of the landscape. Regarding the Classic Inca Trail this has more archeological sites and a unique ...


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