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16

I was thinking a long time on how to best answer this question. Despite the tininess of Liechtenstein I think it is nevertheless necessary to concentrate on one specific part. So I wrote three answers in one. The first for persons who are interested in cultural life, the second for people how focus on some sports and the last one for people who want to party!...


16

I was really curious now and that's why I just had a call with a woman from the Bundesamt für Umwelt, the official federal office that is responsible for tourism in Switzerland. The woman was a little bit suprised about my question but was very kind. She told me that generally wild camping is not allowed in Switzerland (and Liechtenstein). But this law is ...


14

Since you mentioned a multi-day hiking trip, my answer will focus on alpine huts. In other locations, most people accept Euros, but the exchange rate is most often quite poor. Also big grocery stores like Migros or Coop take Euros. Most restaurant in the pedestrian area in Vaduz and Schaan also take Euros, but more remotely located restaurant do not always ...


11

EU Licence Plates The EU countries now have new registration plates incorporating the country code and the EU flag on the left. This voids the need for the former oval sticker, enforced by the Vienna Convention on Road Traffic. Quoting from the "Council Regulation (EC) No 2411/98 of 3 November 1998 on the recognition in intra-Community traffic of the ...


11

There seems to be a small mosque in Liechtenstein, the green mosque in Triesen (about 2km from the city center of Vaduz), that is also mentioned in this travel stub about Liechtenstein for "Halal-conscious travelers". The local population of Muslims only numbers about 2000, but according to Wikipedia, there is one yearly work permit offered for an Imam.


9

There are a lot of different questions in here. I tried to answer at least some of them: 1) Apart from a fully functioning car I would recommend to take a GPS navigation device with you. Check if the maps are up-to-date. Additionally, you should inform yourself, if you need any additional gear if you want to travel through foreign countries. If I remember ...


8

Ok, you have three question in one here. I try to answer all of them. 1) It depends how you want to come to Liechtenstein. Basically, there are two options: by car or by train. To get to Liechtenstein by car, you would leave Munich on the A96, travel trough Memmingen to the German border town Lindau. Then you cross into Austria, but leave Austria again at ...


8

There are a couple of things you should do. Driving license An International driving licensed is not required, when your driving license is in a language that the police can read. They have to verify that you license is up to date an valid. So, when your driving license is in German, French, Italian, or English, you should be fine, and probably there are ...


8

I think that you wouldn't need such a sticker in Europe if the sign of the country is incorporated into the registration plate. But I'm afraid that's not the case with your plates and therefor you will need a sticker. The Vienna Convention on Road Traffic, Article 37 says: Every motor vehicle in international traffic shall display at the rear, in ...


7

From Dictionary camp 1 n. 1. a. A place where tents, huts, or other temporary shelters are set up, as by soldiers, nomads, or travelers. b. A cabin or shelter or group of such buildings: gathered branches and grasses for a makeshift camp; had a fishing camp in Vermont. c. The people using such shelters: a howl that awakened the whole camp. ...


7

I did some researching the last days and since no one else has answered this question, I'll do it. During the winter, but also in spring or late autumn, passes are often closed for cars, because of the weather and road conditions. If you're lucky, you can catch a day when the pass is still closed for cars, but it is already possible to drive over it. This ...


5

Although your license is not revoked/suspended, you won't be able to show an actual hard-copy drivers license document and can't prove on the spot that you're (still) permitted to drive (a copy of your original drivers license is not enough for authorities anywhere in Europe, as far as I know, and only the actual document is valid) and the temporary ...


4

According to Rome2Rio you can go by train from Bregenz to Feldkrich, and then either by next train (8 minutes) or by bus (40 minutes). Bus from Feldkirch to Vaduz leaves every 30 minutes, it goes to Vaduz center: ÖBB website I can't find pricing information though. In LIEmobil I paid with CHF, but I was going from Switzerland.


4

A day is probably good for Liechtenstein, unless you ski. However, the nearby Feldkirch (in Austria) is a wonderful base to explore some countryside Austria, and there are numerous buses as well as some trains that map out of Feldkirch, and you can drop in at different places, have a walk, catch another bus/train, etc. Dornbirn and Rankweil (with its very ...


4

Since we don't know much about your temporary document, it might be easiest to check with the relevant authorities for each of the countries you want to go to. Indeed, the EU page on Driving licence recognition and validity advises to do just that: Provisional or temporary licences, international driving permits (or any other certificates issued in your ...


2

Most European countries require, upon demand, that you identify yourself and in cases of foreigners their legal status. For this your passport and visa is required. A driver's licence is for driving and is not considered an identification of nationality and legal status.


1

Whenever you are crossing a Schengen border, you must de jure be in possession of a valid passport or accepted national ID card. In many countries (I believe Austria to be one) you need to be able to identify yourself (passport or EU member state national ID card) if the police asks you to. If you are driving, of course you must have a valid licence on you ...


1

The nearest railway station to Vaduz is Schaan-Vaduz station which is about a 45 minute walk from the center of Vaduz. Since the station is very far from central Vaduz and there aren't a lot of trains most people use the local bus system, LIEmobil (formerly Lichtenstein Bus). In their current timetable there's a useful map of the network and the note that ...


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