29

One obvious and common interpretation is that people going to Moscow (from London or Tokyo) are often prepared to pay for the additional convenience of a non-stop flight (especially if they are flying on an expense account). On the other hand, people flying between Tokyo and London have no reason to prefer flights with a layover and require another incentive ...


12

If your parents are flying from Calgary, Edmonton, Halifax, Montréal Trudeau, Ottawa, Toronto Pearson, Vancouver, or Winnipeg, they will have the immigration check in Canada before they leave. If they are flying from another Canadian airport, they will have the immigration check in Chicago. In no case would they have any immigration formalities in Honolulu.


12

Is there a reason for this? It's a complicated supply and demand equation. Usually, a major factor is that: The direct flights are a premium product. Of the people in London wanting to get to Moscow (or the people in Moscow wanting to get to Tokyo), the ones with the deepest pockets, most urgency or most flexible expense accounts will favour the direct ...


6

Update: having now done the trip just a few weeks ago, I can 100% confirm the answer is no. I asked officials in the airport if it was possible, and they said I had to leave air side, get the shuttle bus, then go back through security, which is what I did. Some more notes from my experience, to add detail to @yetanothercoder's very useful answer: I got ...


5

Airlines make most money with customers on direct flights. The problem is, offering direct flights between every pair of cities in the world is not economically viable. Having layover passengers enables an airline to offer a flight from A to B on a plane with e.g. 100 seats when only 50 people actually need that flight, as the other 50 seats could be filled ...


3

To use your L-2 visa to enter the US (including for transit), you have to be eligible for L-2 status. L-2 status applies to dependents of someone in L-1 status, which, in your case, is your husband. You've indicated that your husband, from whose L-1 status your L-2 status is derived, continues to work for his employer in the US. So there is no reason to ...


3

You won't need a visa. You can check here: Applying for a Philippine Visa . However, be careful with the timing. Manila traffic is terrible and it could take a long time to get to the city centre and back. Airport procedures can be slow. You will be able to make a token visit, enough to say: "I've been to Manila" but not much more than that. If you ...


2

Yes, you can go to the city. To get to the gate for your flight to Spain, you have to clear Schengen immigration controls in Amsterdam. You can just as well head to the airport exit instead of your gate (which probably won't be assigned when you arrive anyway). As noted in a comment, there are actually different sets of immigration control desks for the ...


1

Twenty minutes to get off the plane. Five minutes to get to the exit doors. One minute to get a taxi. Twenty minutes to get across the river into the city. X minutes to see things. Y minutes to find another taxi. Twenty minutes back to the airport. Five minutes to identify your gate. Z minutes in the security line. Five minutes to run to your gate....


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