Hot answers tagged

67

Do NOT continue speaking to this man, for your own safety! It's clear that you feel lonely and desperate for intimate companionship, and that's who these people target. This man may either keep you in Jordan as a sex slave, use your identity for (further) criminal activities, force you to aid him in getting to the US illegally, or anything else. We don't ...


22

The requirement for Jordan is that your passport must be valid for 6 months after your planned departure from Jordan, not arrival. Thus you will be even further outside the requirement than you've implied. Whether or not she will be given a visa-on-arrival is largely a moot point - she will almost certainly not be allowed board the flight to get Jordan as ...


21

Yes, you can enter Israel or Jordan after visiting the other without problems. The two signed a peace treaty in 1994 and have permitted travel to each other ever since. Of course, you may be questioned in Israel about what you were doing in Jordan, but if you went there for legitimate business reasons, you'll be fine.


19

In most Muslim countries, keeping the arms and legs (and of course the cleavage) covered would be considered completely sufficient, especially for someone who is visibly a foreigner. Some (e.g. Turkey, at least the bigger cities) are much more tolerant and nobody will feel offended by bare arms or legs. The strictest dress code exists in Saudi Arabia, ...


13

I don't know if her application for a Jordanian visa will be denied, but even if she is issued a visa she won't be able to fly. Because they must return passengers to the passenger's departure point at the airline's expense if the passenger is not admitted at their destination, airlines check carefully to see that passengers have the correct paperwork. ...


11

Definitely not in Jordan, except in places like a mosque where you may want to show some respect but it would be enough to put a light foulard on your head. However, other countries may be more strict about this.


10

Yes, you can enter Israel, but be prepared for the possibility of getting grilled hardcore at Israeli immigration for having been to Jordan (they can be even worse than the US at times - I experienced it even though I am Swedish and have never been to an Arab country). Not saying it will happen, but it could. Bring as much documentation as possible proving ...


8

It depends on the country. On the flight to Tehran, the crew members reminded female passengers that headscarves are required attire in public, and that all women should put on a headscarf now, before the aircraft lands.


8

A transit visa is indeed possible (they are issued all the time to commercial vehicle drivers and third country nationals), but recently they have stopped issuing them for non-nationals - and issue them on a case-by-case basis. By national I mean citizen of the destination country; for example an Egyptian national traveling by road from UAE to Egypt. You'...


8

The cheapest way I know is to get a bus from Nazareth all the way to Amman using a company called Nazarene Tours. The bus departs almost daily at 8AM and will cost around $20. You will be dropped off around Amman University. A public bus from Tel Aviv to Nazareth will cost you less than $10. Another company called Mazada Tours has a direct bus from Tel Aviv ...


7

The current Foreign Office travel advice for Jordan warns against travel close to the Syrian border, for obvious reasons. Travel to other areas of Jordan is fine. You should familiarise yourself with the information they provide about safety etc. although most of it is common sense. It also says that over sixty thousand British nationals visited Jordan in ...


7

You can enter Israel directly from Jordan. There are three open border crossings and I myself crossed into Eilat, Israel from Aqaba, Jordan at the Yitzhak Rabin crossing between the two sister cities. Obviously, being a European, I had a Jordanian visa, entry and exit stamp in my passport. If the direct crossing is possible, entering Israel at a later date ...


7

The official page for the Nehar Yarden (Jordan River) crossing, as the Israelis call it, says that your best option is taxi, and like any other Middle East border crossing, I'd expect a few to be hanging around. You/somebody can probably call you a cab in a pinch though. Bus 16 also runs between Beit Shean and the border (stop #8), but there are only a few ...


6

Clothing expectations are generally cultural and legal rather than religious. The best bet is to do some research for the country (or countries) you plan to visit. For example, in Indonesia (the world's largest Muslim country by population), it is acceptable for women to dress casually in most places, bikinis on the beach, and so on. But if you're going to ...


6

It may depend on which crossing you will use. If you go by the Allenby bridge, and return by the Allenby bridge within the visa validity, you don't need a multiple entry visa. They also do not make any stamp on your passport on the Jordanian side (and you can ask for no stamp on the Israeli side) at this border crossing. From a much older version of the ...


6

There are two baptismal sites on the Jordan river, Yardenit and Qasr el Yahud, the former is located fully in Israeli territory and both banks of the river are Israeli. The later, Qasr el Yahud, is the place where, according to Christian tradition, John the Baptist performed the Baptism of Jesus and where, according to Jewish tradition, the Israelites ...


6

Sending personal info to anyone you don't know is always risky. This seems very suspicious, and, in my opinion, you should stop talking to this person right now! Some countries give absurd control to men over their wives. Not sure about Jordan, but might be worth to take a look at it.


6

From a visa point of view, your plan sounds fine. Be sure to arrive early at Ben Gurion, because you may get selected for extra questioning. Enjoy your trip!


5

You've not chosen to share the passport photo, so it's hard to offer an opinion on whether it's acceptable. But if Australia's own border guards haven't said that it's unacceptable or warned you that you should replace your passport, it probably isn't a problem. The actual guidelines for passport photos are: Good quality, colour gloss prints, less ...


5

The good news - Jordan and particularly Amman have seen a huge increase in the number of students coming to learn Arabic (particularly since Damascus and Cairo became less desirable locations...), so there's a growing amount of material available for people interested in languages. Cheap? The bad news is, it tends not to be cheap and second-hand language ...


5

You're in luck! Air Cairo has just launched twice-weekly flights from Cairo to Aqaba: SM219 CAI1145 – 1345AQJ E70 2 SM219 CAI2200 – 2359AQJ E70 5 SM220 AQJ0100 – 0100CAI E70 6 SM220 AQJ1445 – 1445CAI E70 2 ...meaning they fly every Tuesday and Friday.


4

Abdali, Tabarbour, 7th Circle and Al-wehda are all names of bus stations in Amman. Abdali is located near the King Abdullah Mosque. How to get there? I'd just take taxi. However, it's good idea to make sure of the price before you get in. Don't let them rip you off. Wikitravel suggests that directly from the airport it ought to be around 20 dinars, I ...


4

If you are not traveling alone you can use a Taxi, which could run you by my calculation about $250pp. If you want it even cheaper you can do a more complicated route of Tel Aviv - Eilat (#393, #394), Eilat - Aqaba and finally Aqaba - Amman. Or you can do a straight trip as described on True Nomads, which would all run a lot less then $400 for a flight.


4

The cheapest way to get from the Hussein bridge crossing to Beit She'an is line 16. You can see its route here and the time table here. But, it's somewhat complicated because the bus that goes to Beit She'an doesn't stop at the border crossing. So the best way to know what bus you need is Google Maps, search for "צומת נהר הירדן" you can use this link. Once ...


4

The countries that have a problem with Israeli stamps in passports have a problem with Israel (the country) or maybe Jewish people (the religious group). The reason why they do is historic. In all due brevity, a Jewish nation has existed in areas that are now known as Israel in varying degrees of independence from 1000 BCE to around 100 or later CE. After ...


4

You should have no problems with this itinerary. The comment on Wikivoyage is directed at those who use two passports to evade these difficulties. If your Israeli exit stamp is in passport #1 and you have a Jordanian entry stamp from the Israeli border in passport #2, Wikivoyage is saying you may still be refused entry by Arab League states like Sudan. I've ...


4

The website of the United States Department of State suggests that this is not possible: Individuals with Israeli citizenship, regardless of other nationality, including U.S. citizenship, are prohibited from entering Gaza, entering or departing Jordan via the Allenby/King Hussein Bridge, and are generally prohibited from traveling to parts of the West ...


4

The Jordan Pass entitles you to a visa-on-arrival and it also gives you entrance to Petra. You need to print it, though, in my experience electronic copies were not accepted. It is still way less hassle than mailing your passport at home to the consulate.


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