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49

Thailand actually has a significant Muslim minority (around 5% of the population), so the idea of halal food -- locally known as ahaan Muslim (อาหารมุสลิม), literally "Muslim food" -- is well understood, and you will not be considered rude for asking. Thailand's Muslims are heavily concentrated in the South near the Malaysian border, but Bangkok also has a ...


44

Yes. The Frankfurt Airport website page on Muslim prayer rooms says: Friday prayers are held in the Muslim prayer room in Terminal 1 every Friday at the time stated in the prayer calendar. Prayer room for Muslims Terminal 1, Level 3, Departures B, Room 201.3014-3015 Terminal 1, Level 2, near Gate B22 Terminal 2, Level 3, near Gate D1 ...


38

Yes, you can perform Umrah while on a visit eVisa. From the official eVisa website: 8.7 An eVisa is granted solely for tourist purposes or for the purpose of performing a umrah and it is not considered a visa for work. If you are granted an eVisa, you must not take up paid employment during your visit to KSA.


37

TL;DR: It's complicated, but in practice, yes, building snowmen is still allowed for everybody. A fatwa is not a law, it's a ruling by an Islamic scholar that's technically only binding on the person who issued it, not all Muslims in Saudi Arabia, much less all people there. This particular fatwa does not appear to originate from the Permanent Committee, ...


37

Yes there is near gate B26. There are rooms for multiple faiths It provides wudu area both for brothers and sisters


30

Update 3 August 2017 Extracted from comments to this answer and moved into the answer body itself to assure their visibility and preservation... Thank u so much everyone. This has been a wonderful experience to consult my issues with u. I got my Short term student visa for 6 months. I officially withdraw my allegation of judging the application ...


29

Israel is quite a safe country. However, due to its particular geopolitical situation, there can be surprises. Travel to some regions should be avoided, such as the immediate surroundings of the Gaza Strip and the surroundings of the Lebanese border. Due to the war in Syria, there might be some trouble in the Golan Heights. If that's the case, the region ...


29

TL; DR: Yes. I grew up in Malaysia and I am a non-Muslim. I have been inside Putra Mosque, in the capital city of Putrajaya. It was part of a class field trip I had when I was in school. However, you should pay close attention to etiquette and expected behaviors as outlined in your own answer. The girls in my group wore long sleeves, and shawls to cover ...


29

I have a very simple rule: If you have to ask, it is not halal. If it was halal you would clearly know it by virtue of signage in any non Muslim country. Halal food in non Muslim countries is a minority speciality and there’s no point in someone serving halal food without promoting it clearly, in such places. So if you haven’t seen the sign on or in a ...


27

(Full resolution) Traditional Islamic law is known as Sharia. By and large, countries following it or having a dual system of civil law as well as Sharia is depicted in this map. As a traveller, this is something you need to watch out for as a country you're visiting may have laws not commonly found in civil law found in most other countries. What makes it ...


27

I see from the comments that you're from Bangladesh. As there is a centre in Bangladesh where you can take the exam with three sittings this year, it would seem likely you've not convinced the visa official why you need to enter the UK. If what you're actually taking is PACES, while you can't take that in Bangladesh there are other centres closer to you - ...


23

Keep two basic facts in mind: Nobody in London will care what the Iranian government declares your religion to be. Most people you encounter won't even have a way to know -- and those (if any) who can know also know that it is difficult or impossible for people considered Muslim by Islamic governments to change that categorization. There are plenty of ...


22

I was raised and spend 18 years of my life in Madinah which is the second holy city for Muslims and it is so close to Makkah (A.K.A. Mecca). These two cities have similar rules and mostly all pilgrims visit Madinah either before or after Hajj so I am answering this out of personal experience and observation and not influenced by the western media. Short ...


22

It is perfectly fine. The call to prayer is frequently televised so there is nothing wrong with recording it and posting it on youtube. It is done often. However, do not go to the mosque during prayer and start recording there. Its not that its not allowed, its just that you'll have to have prior permission and you may be a distraction to the congregation.


19

A fatwa is not a legal opinion, it is a religious opinion and it only sometimes has to do with the law. This distinction is important if the country's legal system follows the Sharia, and typically in those cases, the rulings are done by a central committee (as in Saudi Arabia) and not just any goof with mouth. In Saudi, there have been some insane "fatwas"...


19

In most Muslim countries, keeping the arms and legs (and of course the cleavage) covered would be considered completely sufficient, especially for someone who is visibly a foreigner. Some (e.g. Turkey, at least the bigger cities) are much more tolerant and nobody will feel offended by bare arms or legs. The strictest dress code exists in Saudi Arabia, ...


19

Ramadan is the 9th month of the Islamic year, it can be 29 or 30 days (as every other month in this lunar calendar). Usually this is determined by visual observation of the moon in the 29th of the month, if the moon was observed then the month is 29 days, if not then the month will continue to 30 days. FYI, this is why the crescent is considered the symbol ...


19

Note that the sign is specifically for St. Peter's Basilica, and not Vatican City. A small point considering the size of the place, but you have asked about Vatican City. If she is wearing the Hijab then there will be no issues; covering of the head/hair is common as a sign of respect (for women, for men, its opposite - you can't wear hats); and as ...


16

Aceh's sharia is pretty standard if strict stuff: No alcohol or gambling. No khalwat ("proximity") between unrelated, unchaperoned men and women. This extends not just to the obvious (eg. sharing a hotel room), but even dining together in restaurants etc. That said, an unmarried Western couple can simply claim to be married, and they'll most likely be ...


16

As far as UAE is concerned, there is only one issue at hand - since you are not going to consume alcohol inside the UAE but on-board the aircraft; where they do not check your religion. If you appear publicly intoxicated, you are breaking the law. That's it. So, as long as you can "hold your liquor", you'll be fine. The problem is that "intoxicated" is ...


15

Yes, non-Muslims are allowed to enter (at least some) mosques in Malaysia. See user casvaart's answer for a local's perspective.


14

Not at all. I lived in Georgia from November 2011 to May 2012 and there were lots of people visiting from nearby Muslim and Arab countries. In fact Georgia seemed one of the easiest countries to travel to for various Muslim and Arab countries going by conversations I had with people I met while working there in a backpacker hostel. I think in terms of ...


13

Even in turbulent times (2014) I think Israel is a relatively safe country for Muslims. Safer than some other countries in the region. Some things to keep in mind while in the country: Avoid demonstrations, both in Israel and even more in the West Bank. Display of Islamic clothing or objects can lead to significantly more trouble with authorities and with ...


13

According to the Dubai authorities, the Jumeirah Mosque is "the only mosque in Dubai which is open to the public and dedicated to receiving non-Muslim guests." (At least insofar as going inside is concerned, I can't speak to the grounds, and you can certainly see mosques from the outside around the city.) They operate a tour most days: The Sheikh ...


12

Having been in Malaysia, I can attest that visiting a mosque is possible for non-Muslims. There were no restrictions as far I could tell and I have entered at least a dozen mosques principally around Kuala Lumpur but also some in southern provinces. In some cases, there were signs indicating not to take photos within the prayer hall itself but the outer ...


12

Yes, you can perform Umrah on a Saudi Arabian e-visa. From this news article: Among the most important features of the Saudi tourist visa, is the visa holder can benefit from it in performing Umrah, women need not be accompanied by a male relative, other than in the Haj season, and there is no need for a sponsor (kafeel) the way it is required for work ...


11

Categorically NO! I am a woman, I live in Iran, I go skiing EVERY week, I wear the same gear I wear when I ski in Europe or in the US. I am never, ever accompanied by men. Funnily enough, the slopes are the least 'Islamic' places in Iran and it is really amazing to see what young (unmarried) men and woman get up to there - it would make any Westerner ...


11

Definitely not in Jordan, except in places like a mosque where you may want to show some respect but it would be enough to put a light foulard on your head. However, other countries may be more strict about this.


11

There seems to be a small mosque in Liechtenstein, the green mosque in Triesen (about 2km from the city center of Vaduz), that is also mentioned in this travel stub about Liechtenstein for "Halal-conscious travelers". The local population of Muslims only numbers about 2000, but according to Wikipedia, there is one yearly work permit offered for an Imam.


10

I can answer about the Middle East & North Africa only (the politically so-called "Arab World") Egypt and Tunisia are not Muslim Countries since Islamic law is only one of the sources of legislation, not the only one, and used only in specific cases. Muslim Countries are ones like Saudi Arabia, Iran, Kuwait...etc (religious states) whose law is only ...


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