151

A senior cabin crew member here. There's nothing to worry about, we ought to wake passengers up during meal services, for both service and safety reasons: Service: So no one misses the meal, then gives us a hard time later trying to get them one, or even worse, file a complaint! Also, meals cannot be served more than 30 minutes after they are heated, and ...


147

A cabin crew member here... In general, flight attendants will be happy to give you the extra meal after the service is done, because they know it will be thrown after landing anyway. Out of experience, there are always some extra meals, at least one or two. Sometimes passengers simply do not take a meal, some other times there's just an extra meal or two ...


98

Flight is waste, and extra weight matters Coarse rule of thumb, by deciding to fly, total fuel weight divided by total pax weight is attributable to you*. That's a lot - it's your own weight in fuel, and probably quite a bit more. As far as possessions, this isn't a train. Every gram of additional weight adds to induced drag which adds to fuel burn. ...


67

They aren't! You are typically going to be sitting down and getting very limited exercise. On a long haul flight of 12 hours, based on a 2000 kcal/day requirement, the average person will burn in and around 1000 calories. A conservative estimate for the calories in that small breakfast picture would be around 300, and that's a New York to London flight, ...


63

I have requested countless times vegan/vegetarian meals on long-haul flights. Normally they are pretty well organized and you won't have to ask for the meal. My strategy is just to wait and if given the normal food, then I politely remind them I have a special arrangement. In hundred of flights, this has only happened maybe 1 or 2 times. In most airlines, ...


49

You have no recourse for compensation other than perhaps to call and ask for a few miles to be credited to your frequent flier account. Brussels Airline is a reputable airline, they will likely agree to do that. They do not like negative publicity. Meals on most airlines are not part of the contract, they are a courtesy offered to you and have zero monetary ...


47

Yes you can ask. And I have successfully asked for extra food in the past (i.e. over the last five years and as recent as a month ago). One time when asking for a second sandwich I was even proactively offered a third one later on. I also typically ask for two beverages and never had that refused. Of course they have no obligation to give you extra food ...


41

The only way would be to refuse the food package, as they always come prepacked with the cutlery and other items you may not want from the packaging facility. SOME airlines may still offer reusable cutlery that's washed and used again on another flight, most no longer do because of the higher weight, cost of ferrying the stuff around the world, cost of ...


40

Same way any restaurant catering is done: first you guess, then you iterate. Airlines frequently repeat the same meals over and over again, so it doesn't take very long to get to a reasonably good balance, and of course the big carriers worked out their beef vs chicken ratios years ago. Update: An interesting story about using AI to optimize this: https://...


38

They might consider special ordering a bland meal from Qatar Airways (insert "aren't normal airplane meals bland?" joke here): Bland Meal (BLML) - This meal is for customers who prefer light and easily digestible foods that are low in fat and help prevent gastric discomfort. It may contain: Low-fat food items such as boiled meats, soft vegetables, mashed ...


36

The answer is no, although some airlines will allow you to purchase a special economy meal. Airlines do not allow their premium class offerings to be split up. You either purchase the whole package or you get none of it. The meal is probably less than 15 USD per person at cost, plus a similar amount per bottle of wine at bulk discount prices, but there's no ...


34

I think most people choose between airlines based on the cost of airfare, and not the quantity or even quality of in-flight meal service, therefore airlines are not incentivized to compete on those. Then their goal is to serve food that is just good enough for the majority of passengers. Increasing portions to satisfy the hungriest passenger on every ...


33

Laudable as minimising waste on a flight might be, taking the flight create orders of magnitude more environmental damage than the little bit you're trying to mitigate. Greenwash what you do in the cabin if it makes you feel better, but please don't fool yourself that you're doing anything remotely useful by it. You could produce a many decade-fold better ...


29

I don't think there's any law about it on the ground, at least in most countries. So in that case it is up to the pilots. If you're flying in Europe on a short haul carrier the turn around time is pretty tight and the pilots will have a lot to do to get ready for their next sector. Also the plane has to be cleaned and so on in about twenty minutes so ...


29

Always tell the cabin crew what you want. In a kind way. When they are not busy, ask gently, "I am not a frequent flier, and this is new to me; could I please be woken for the dinner service?" Done. EDIT: Additionally, for an extra help, kindly ask your neighbor passenger to wake you if the flight attendant does not (even though he probably will), ...


24

There are meals for everyone on board. Not everyone eats even and falling asleep in an airplane is a rather difficult thing to do, so when staff passes to distribute meals, they will simply move along. This is not a much of a problem because you can always call an attendant and request your meal at a later time. The common disadvantage of this is that they ...


23

As with most things nowadays, there is a webpage for it ;-) Actually, there are (at least) two: You can search or browse by airline which should provide you with a good starting point to figure out the food choices for your connection. Feel free to share your own experiences and help these sites grow!


23

Maybe, but almost certainly not in cash, and not if you don't follow up. If you send a feedback form from the website, describe the issue, note that you reported it and the crew was unable to fix the issue, you will likely get a small token of compensation like frequent flyer miles, a duty free shopping voucher or a flight voucher. (A better airline would ...


22

I was recently on Philippine Airlines from Manila to Sydney. We were down the back and suspected they'd run out of what looked to be the most popular. Shrug, we took the second option. Man behind us - however, was fuming (he'd complained about everything already - the seat, the wine, the people around him) and had a good rant to the steward about it. She ...


22

For the airline I work for rules simply say "passengers are not allowed to enter the cockpit at all times" and this is the rules for most (if not all) airlines, but out of personal experience as a cabin crew member this is not something unusual to happen after landings, especially for younger ones. After all the captain is in charge and can break the rules. ...


22

It's meant to go with your pre-dinner drink. Better airlines still do a drinks run before they start the dinner service, so the pretzels/peanuts/etc are meant to accompany the drink, particularly if alcoholic. Of course, a number of airlines now charge for drinks or have cut them out entirely, making this a bit of a vestigial appendix.


16

British Airways uses a standard 3.5mm port in all classes; you should be fine to bring your own headphones. [edit] However, I always include in my travel electronics kit an airline headphone adapter, which allows you to use your headphones' single 3.5mm stereo jack with the double 3.5mm mono ports found on some equipment, including older BA aircraft. In ...


16

Often, at the start of the flight, the crew will announce the times at which they'll be serving meals or you may find this info on a menu (if they hand one out) or in the inflight magazine (e.g. Korean Air). Normally meals are shortly after departure and/or shortly before landing. If you want to eat the first meal you can simply stay awake until it is ...


15

A full list of special meals types is available on wikipedia. Not every one is available on every airline, for example here is Etihad's selection. There are quite a number of meal types that are vegetarian, so you don't have to restrict yourself to just the normal VLML, and might want to try one of the others for a change: VGML - Vegetarian Meal (usually ...


15

I have heard that people have carried the dried product on board without issue (both in hand luggage and hold luggage, I think) and see no reason why they should not be able to. TSA for example does not identify it specifically as a prohibited item and in the UK for example, caffeine is not a controlled drug (eg mate is available in health food shops, over ...


15

I recognize there are many answers already, and some very good ones: It is true that the CO2 is also waste, and that it dwarves everything else connected to it. It is also true that you cannot always avoid flying, and in this case it is also good to minimize the impact. I'd like to focus on what you can do if you have to take the flight. I'll use Europe/...


14

Nothing wrong with asking - treating cabin crew as humans (be nice, be polite, don't stress them if you see they are busy, wait for your turn) will get you a long way. You'd be amazed what is possible. One nice passenger offsets many rude ones - be the nice one!


14

On all airlines, the cabin crew are there primarily for safety and secondarily to provide amenities such as food and drink. So if the cabin crew does not confidently feel that they can provide you an alcoholic beverage because: you are drunk, are already belligerent, or that you might become so if you drink too much — they are well within their rights to ...


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