Hot answers tagged

44

This appears to be related to the COVID eviction moratorium: [I]t is critical to protect tenants and residents of traditional dwellings from homelessness, as well as those who have lawfully occupied or resided in less traditional dwelling situations for 14 days or more, whether or not documented in a lease, including but not limited to roommates who share a ...


40

Because hotels are in the short-term rentals business. If they let you stay too long, they risk turning into a landlord as some states will consider you to be a tenant after only 30 days. Becoming a tenant gives you numerous additional rights so the hotels are restricting the maximum duration of stay. For California see Cal. Civ. Code § 1940.1 Section 1940....


27

There are not a lot of options equivalent to pod hotels, though some concepts in the same family do exist. Some hostels have private rooms (sometimes still with a shared bathroom), which may be a good option those who want a hostel but with more privacy. These vary significantly in security and design, so you'd have to research that. There are some micro-...


12

While this doesn't expressly address the "are there single traveler, pod-type hotels in the US?", it does offer a solution that the pod-type hotel would - lower cost. The cost of the hotel room in a particular city (in the US, at least) is dictated a couple of factors: The "chain" or brand of hotel you're booking. Hilton is more ...


9

I am not sure about Morocco but this is your run of the mill newspaper rack. If you were in a breakfast restaurant in the 60-80s you would likely see this with a different section of the newspaper separated and hung. These were even at the big double arches. People may put magazines on them but it was made for newspapers. It would be normal for a ...


8

My rule of thumb for booking "reasonable" accommodation in Japan is ¥10,000 per night for two. In cities, this is sufficient for a clean if often cramped "business hotel" room for two. In the countryside, this is enough for almost all minshuku (inn/B&B) accommodation, perhaps the lower tiers of ryokan as well if you skip meals/...


7

There are single room options in regular hotels, if not all and often not many per hotel even if they do exist, so likely to be booked out when you book on short notice. How many and how much cheaper does depend on location and the market they serve. I find them when using a hotel booking site which allows searching for a single occupant.


5

What you're looking for is called "third party liability insurance" and is widely available worldwide. In the US it is usually sold as part of homeowners/renters insurance. Outside the US I've seen it sold as a separate product. Some travel insurance companies also include it as part of their package. It will cover accidental damage to other people'...


5

I feel like many people traveling on their institution's dime may have faced this kind of situation and perhaps I did travel on the government's dime occasionally and the hotel bill/invoice has always be acceptable. The invoice includes Name of guest Arrival and departure dates However, it's not exactly an invoice or billing statement we're looking for. 3....


5

If you are going to Spain in the summer you need to bear in mind that during the day it can get very hot so people tend to limit their activities during the middle of the day. The converse of this is that they come out later at night than people in more northern countries. Eating in a restaurant before 2100 hours is unusual and later in Madrid. So you can ...


3

I lived three months in Burgos on the second floor of a street full of restaurants and bars. Noisy in the evening, but quiet from midnight till the following evening.  Two weeks in Santiago, two nights in Pamplona, several in Barcelona, and various other places. No complaints about noise.  I've heard the same rumor, but I don't believe it.


3

(disclaimer, experience in major cities only) I've not experienced this, except for loud drunk tourists in Barcelona in the most touristic areas If you're in a Hotel and guests (especially) or someone in the street causes too much noise whatever the time of day, complain to the hotel staff. It's true that in some area in Spain people will stay out late, but ...


3

L’hotel Island South sounds like one of them. Source. Hong Kong hotels operator L’hotel Group has turned to robots amid a Covid-19 driven slump in the hospitality sector, with the aim of providing meals to guests and ensuring reduced interaction with staff. The company, which is wholly owned by property developer Chinachem Group, will have three artificial ...


3

New York requirements It seems likely that you will not have any trouble here so long as you do not stay in the state for a prolonged time. The only reason I hesitate here is that older versions of the NY state travel rules specifically allowed for an exception for travelers who were in the state for less than 24 hours; but the most recent travel rules for ...


3

New York is not the main destination for either of you—Pennsylvania is. The page you will want to review is COVID-19 Information for Travelers from the Pennsylvania Department of Health. Generally, people in transit have not been subject to the same requirements as people arriving at their destination. The purpose of these orders after all is to limit the ...


3

It depends on when and where you stay. Of course, the festive season is more expensive, but not that much more expensive. You can get a reasonably priced hotel on Jan 2nd; I did and it was a nice hotel! If you are staying in Tokyo, then 10,000 JPY per night per room (2 people) seems right. The outskirts of Tokyo, e.g. Yokohama, is a bit cheaper but not too ...


3

In Western Europe, you will find discount hotel chains like F1, Première Classe, B&B Hotels, or Ibis Budget. They do not offer capsules but rather rooms for up to 2-3 people, often en-suite. They seem to cater to a similar market, though, and easily beat your $100-150 price (typically under €50 for a room, even for single occupancy). They are common in ...


2

Yes, many hostels in Europe have been switching over to pod hotels in recent years. There's a pretty nice one that I've seen in Tallinn, Estonia. Just search "pod" or "capsule" on a booking site and you're bound to find a few. I do not think this trend would apply in the USA, where hostels never really took off in the first place.


2

Possibly not the geography you're looking for, but there is a pod hotel at the departures area of Moscow Sheremetyevo airport. It has about a dozen pods, maybe a bit more. I don't remember the terminal, though - it was an Aeroflot flight code-shared with LOT to Warsaw in June this year, if that helps. I also don't know the price, or about other airports - I ...


2

Old fashioned wall mounted drying rack Usually wooden devices like this on walls open up and hinge down, and are old fashioned drying racks. Here is one with arms that open, and is not a lean out rack like the one in your room. Clothes Drying Rack - Old Fashion Design Copy It bothered me to see the wife having to work so hard to set up a collapsible drying ...


2

I was working in Las Vegas shortly after the Riviera fire, because they didn’t have identification for a lot of people it took a lot longer for victims that didn’t survive to be identified. if there’s an emergency in your hotel and If for some unseen circumstance happens and they need to identify who is supposed to be In which room it helps if you have a ...


2

Why do some hotels ask you to leave the key at the reception when you go out to come back later? In the past (1970's/80's), for smaller hotels and pensions: prevention of loss (they were rather ugly and heavy for a reason) prevention of strangers 'wandering' around, where the reception is strategically placed near the main/only entry telefon calls: with ...


2

Has it become a common occurrence in an attempt to drive rates down ? Not really. That's the first time I've seen that (and I use hotels a lot) Do major hotels actually engage in such deceptive practices They do and it's getting worse and worse. There are lots of hidden fees and taxes that they glob on to advertise an artifically low price. "Resort ...


2

It's typically noisy in the evenings, both due to locals and tourists. However this varies a lot, even from night to night, as well as depending on time of year. It should be possible to find a quiet hotel if you try a few things. Look on Google Street View and Google Maps to see if a street has any bars or restaurants nearby. You can probably even find the ...


1

This is seldom the case nowadays but it still does happen. You are absolutely right that the practice is silly and is generally unnecessary. Your question about international hotels covers an extremely wide net that includes vastly different practices across locations and property types. So, keep in mind that there are vastly different protocols and not one ...


1

Many (but not all) Marriott hotels in Asia, including Hong Kong, now offer "Mobile Key" which lets you use your own phone as a key to enter the room and other amenities like gyms etc: https://help.marriott.com/s/article/Article-22239 After inhaling Starwood, Marriott is now the largest hotel chain in the world, with brands including Westin, W, ...


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