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1

Others have commented on how to find equivalent drug names, I have another very important tidbit to add that is related to the problem. THE LEGALITY OF YOUR DRUGS IN YOUR DESTINATION Many countries have comprehensive lists of drugs (subject to immediate change without notice,) that are illegal to possess or bring into the country! For example Japan (from: ...


6

The normal cabin pressure during flight is basically a function of the aircraft type. Maintaining a lower pressure in the cabin creates a higher pressure difference between the cabin and the air outside of the plane, which the aircraft needs to be able to sustain. The vast majority of modern aircraft are pressurized to around 8,000 feet during normal ...


3

A search on Wikipedia will often yield exactly the information you seek. You can search for the chemical name or trade name. Wikipedia is smart enough to figure out what you mean, and will typically take you to the correct page. On the page it presents, trade names will often be presented for multiple geographic regions. Here is a good example: A search on ...


13

The existing answer is good, but I'd like to clarify the different types of drug name. Each drug has a generic name, and often one or more brand names under which it's sold.  Sometimes it's sold under the generic name directly (e.g. by smaller pharmacies, supermarket own brands, online, etc.). Commonly-known and -available brands vary across the world.  ...


24

Google is indeed your friend, and the fact that you are from US, an English-speaking country, is a great plus. Now let me say. When visiting other countries, you must check with your doctor and local regulations because not all drugs can be sold by a random stranger walking into pharmacy. You may need an internationalized prescription, which is handled by ...


18

I found the following resource to find the name of the equivalents of a US drug in other countries: https://www.drugs.com/international/ The Drugs.com International Drug Name Database contains information about medications found in 185 countries around the world. The database contains more than 40,000 medication names marketed outside the USA and is ...


5

The "official documentation" used in the US is the CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Record Card. (Image from user whoisjohngalt via Wikimedia Commons) As you said in your comment, you do have one of those, even if it may look like just a "slip of paper".


2

You can travel, as Spain is currently on the amber list, but you are treated as "not fully vaccinated" for the purposes of (eg) quarantine-on-arrival and post-arrival testing. The quote from HMG's website is not, it seems to me, in any way ambgiuous: being about people who have natural immunity though prior infection boosted by a single dose of ...


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