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2

I lived the most part of my life in Germany, though the last ten years I haven't. I don't remember seeing these anywhere other than IKEA and maybe some other, really large stores, but not malls (malls are generally not that prevalent anyway there). If interested in a particular mall, try googling something like mallname Kinderbetreuung or generically ...


1

Just an addition about the issues regarding hotel bookings. It is not directly required by law in Germany to be over the age of 18 to book a hotel room, but there are so many legal grey areas and pit-falls to consider, that most hotels don't allow persons under 18 to book a room or even use a room alone, if they are travelling alone without a parent or ...


0

you need definitely more than a passport and money to come to Germany.. here the official info: https://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/travel/entry-exit/travel-documents-minors/germany/index_en.htm I quote: Travel documents for minors – Germany In addition to their own valid travel document (passport or ID card), although not obligatory by law, ...


3

As an EU citizen, you have a right to travel to Germany with minimal fuss. As a minor, Germany will try to protect you against running away from your parents or being abducted. According to German law, your legal guardians have the right and the duty to determine your locaction. They should do that in accordance with your age and maturity, so the law does ...


3

I think it is true. You probably won't need a consent letter from your parents, but it couldn't hurt to have one. I would probably carry a letter signed by both of them, along with photocopies of their passports or IDs showing a matching signature. But I suppose you are unlikely to have to show it to anyone. You won't normally encounter government ...


7

I can't speak for the whole of Europe, but these are certainly not common in Germany. I don't remember them in the UK either, although it's a while (8 years) since I lived there. IKEA stores quite often have them (with limited opening hours), but that's the only example I can remember seeing.


4

Since we don't know much about your temporary document, it might be easiest to check with the relevant authorities for each of the countries you want to go to. Indeed, the EU page on Driving licence recognition and validity advises to do just that: Provisional or temporary licences, international driving permits (or any other certificates issued in your ...


4

Although your license is not revoked/suspended, you won't be able to show an actual hard-copy drivers license document and can't prove on the spot that you're (still) permitted to drive (a copy of your original drivers license is not enough for authorities anywhere in Europe, as far as I know, and only the actual document is valid) and the temporary ...


2

It is not so much related to the time of departure, but to which distance you are travelling. ÖBB, the train operator, publishes a complete price list for all their tickets on domestic, German relations. As you can see on pages 37 and 38, they only publish ticket prices for seating (Sitz) from (von) Frankfurt Süd to (nach) any station in Berlin. It looks as ...


0

There doesn't seem to be a fixed time for all trains. I checked different Nightjet lines (with destinations to Hamburg, Berlin, and Rome), and for Hamburg and Berlin sleeper coaches are available for departures before midnight (i.e. up until Mannheim. Frankfurt Süd is the first stop where you can't book them), while for Rome they are also available at least ...


7

Car rental types are generally defined by SIPP codes, which is a standard defined by a consortium of car rental companies. These are 4 character codes that indicate the size, type, transmission/drive, and fuel type/air conditioning. For example, ICMD represents an intermediate (I) size 2/4 Door (C) car with manual transmission (M) and diesel with air ...


2

Both Germany and Finland are in the Schengen Area, so the flight between Frankfurt and Finland is internal to Schengen, and you enter the Schengen Area in Frankfurt and that will be problem if your visa is not valid. Your problems might (should) already start when you try to baord the plane in Shanghai as the airline will probably not allow you to board ...


5

What you've found by googling is correct, the VAC staff member seems to have misinformed you. Flights within the Schengen area, such as your flight from Frankfurt to Helsinki, are esssentially "domestic" flights for immigration purposes - there are generally no immigration controls before or after them (occasional spot-checks may be possible). Your paperwork ...


-1

Pay close attention to the refusal notice you received. It will explain why you were refused. If you don't address that then other embassies will refuse you for the same reason. You should not apply to other embassies unless you change your itinerary. If Germany is the country you will spend most time in then that's where you should apply. Other embassies ...


0

If this is the first usage of the visa, you should have told them your intended travel plan to both countries. If the whole trip to both countries are within 90 days, that should be ok. Business trip in Malta is the main purpose of the trip, so starting in Germany as a tourist and going on to Malta should also be ok. (If asked, you intend to be 1 day ...


1

Yes. 1.5 hour is plenty unless there is unusual back up at immigration or your incoming flight is significantly delayed That's on the tight side. Mainly the problem is getting from gate to gate. Frankfurt is airport is huge so it depends a bit how far the gates are apart. If both flights arrive/depart from Pier A (typically for Schengen flights), than it's ...


4

You should follow the rules an apply to the country that is the main destination of your trip! If you try going on a trip very different from the one described in your visa application, you might get your visa cancelled when you try to enter, and possible be charged for deception. If your circumstances had changed enough for the UK to grant you a visa, ...


2

Short answer: no, this must be applied for in your country of residence The Verpflichtungserklärung is a legally binding declaration that the signer will cover all costs of a foreign national while in Germany this is mainly intended for German residents only The Visa guidelines state this can also be used for travel visas which a consulate or embassy can ...


0

The commitment form is what the call obligation letter,you need to get it from your local authority in Germany showing that you are inviting someone from Thailand who will stay for a certain duration of time,then send it to your Thai Partner to take it to the Embassy,that way your partner will get the visa.it happened to me last year but got the visa after I ...


0

They're not routes. They're fare zones. People who ride from farther away pay more for their tickets. There may well be circumferential (crosstown) routes that ring the city. However, they want those routes to stay in the same ring, not cross ring borders multiple times during the journey (making fare pricing very confusing). So they place the "rings" so ...


14

Each ring is a collection of fare zones -- that is, a particular geographical area -- as shown on the zone map: Even though this is not very detailed, comparison with the S-Bahn and U-Bahn network should show that rings A and B covers pretty much everywhere you will have any reason to go, other than because you live out there.


7

The 'rings' and 'zones' are used for ticket pricing. If you live in Hamburg, and you don't regularly need to travel outside Hamburg, then the main zones and rings are those highlighted in blue on Hamburg transport maps. The rings are the letters, i.e., ring A & B. The bold black numbers are the zones. If you take out a season ticket, they become ...


1

As an Indian citizen you are required to make the application for a work visa at a consulate responsible for the area of your main residence (which in this case is not your home country). The application will be decided (in most cases) by the local Foreigners Office in Germany and can take up to 3 months. It would be wise to inform the Cousulate of the ...


1

Just having money isn't enough. Your friend has a son-in-law in Germany who is inviting her for some time. She probably isn't young any more. A suspicious mind could wonder if she wants to move in with her daughter and family and overstay. So your fried has to explain why she wants to come to Germany and why she will leave again. But there is a special case ...


1

Technically, you are correct that carrying objects out and back in is customs-free, without value limits. Practically, probably nobody will ask ever, if you just walk through the green exit. If you ever get stopped, you should be able to simply declare that all these items were bought before the trip, and simple carried in and out; and for smaller value ...


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