New answers tagged

4

Yes, you can leave Germany for as long as you want with a youth mobility visa. However, you cannot spend more than 90 days in any 180-day period in other Schengen countries with that visa. You could exceed that limit in another Schengen country if you had another D visa from that country. Similarly, if you go to a non-Schengen country such as Canada or ...


4

If your intention is to cross the border from Germany to Austria, that is easy once you are legally inside the Schengen area (includes all of the continental EU except Croatia, Romania and Bulgaria, plus non EU members such as Switzerland and Norway). Systematic border checks have been abolished and the entire EU is a single customs union so there should be ...


1

Adding to what others have said, theoretically there are no systematic border checks between Schengen countries. However, there are frequent "random" checks. I live in Germany and have travelled 4 or 5 times in the last year to Poland and Czech Republic via train and have been checked for a passport twice. With respect to Austria specifically, there are ...


3

You should careful pack the oil, some airlines requires double layer. 3-4 liters should be OK for Germany, if you import just oil (ev. with few other cheap items). The only airline I know that has restrictions on olive oil is Aeroflots, and only on flights from Greece to Russia (no such restriction on oil on other flights).


8

That's possible, and very easy. so is it basically just like taking the train within Germany then? Do I even need to bring my passport? Sadly, it is not just like taking a train within Germany. In theory, it should be. In practice, due to developments since 2015 onwards, no. You may be, and should expect to be controlled at the border. And you had better ...


4

I strongly recommend not sleeping outside in larger cities. Especially not in parks, as you may become subject to attacks from youth gangs doing drugs. It's all okay in rural areas (yes, they have parks in villages and suburbs). Technically it's not allowed to build up a hammock or tent in public space but as long you don't litter the place or camp for days ...


11

The train between Munich and Innsbruck through Kufstein has spot checks. It doesn't stop but the border police enters the train a few stations before Kufstein and walks through the carriages. If you look suspicious, they want to check your identity so have your passport at hand. There are no customs checks.


7

If you submit two visa applications, then you'll be paying for both of them. The fees are for processing each individual petition. I would say that this is a situation that justifies applying for a multiple entry visa, but ultimately that is up to the visa officer. If you have a previous travel history which is good, then you shouldn't have a problem ...


31

As long as you stay within the Schengen Area, you should be able to travel freely without any systematic passport checks, so in most cases, it looks exactly like domestic travel. The Schengen Area is composed of 22 of the 28 EU member states, as well as some other non-EU states such as Switzerland. Germany and Austria are both part of the Schengen Area. ...


9

It is extremely easy and there is no check. As a non-Schengen national I took the train between Austria and Germany twice in the last few months, and there was no suggestion that passports might be checked. I also took a bus tour that crossed the border and we were not even advised to bring passports. There are not normally checks when crossing the border ...


16

You should always have your passport with you when out of your own country.  Within Schengen, you’ll not likely be asked for it, but it’s possible, and if you don’t have it when asked, definitely a hassle or worse. You can probably book train trips on whatever site you use within Germany, but you can also easily do it at Loco. There are probably other ...


5

Travelling regularly between Germany and Italy I usually get stopped at custom when entering Switzerland, a Schengen Area country but not part of the EU, but never happened when crossing Austria. There should not be any barrier except due diligence police controls on trains and at boarding in the train station. Edit: corrected as Switzerland is actually ...


3

As already mentioned in the comments, what you plan (7-8 days) is not a transit. Holding a green card itself doesn't allow you to enter the Schengen area without a visa, so it's up to your nationality. In this document you can find a list of all countries whose nationals are required to be in possession of a visa. Europe.eu also shows an interactive map ...


-3

I live in Hamburg and while maybe not all over Germany you can take the bike with you inside the train, you definitely can in HVV trains in Hamburg: https://www.hvv.de/en/service/cyclists/bikes-on-board-hvv-services


6

There are typically no discount tickets for students in Germany. As student, you get a 'Semsterticket' together with your matriculation documents after payment of your semester fee. This ticket allows you to use public buses and trains for free within the state, except long range trains like IC/EC/ICE. Since Bremen is a small state on its own, the range ...


5

Deutsche Bahn has a toolbox called Ist mein Zug pünktlich?. They also publish statistics. Both are an authoritative source. To my experience, delays are worst with regional trains as they wait for delayed IC/EC and ICE trains so passengers won't miss their regional connections.


2

July 29 2019. Travelled via Munich to Delhi ,expired H1B . No one asks for extension. No one asked anything about it . Regular check-in. During the check in at Lufthansa website it clearly says expired H1B is fine and no transit Visa required. Dear please check if you fulfill the following regulations. Nationals of India transiting through Frankfurt (FRA) ...


1

You could pay 10 EUR a month to the Leipzig based company Nextbike for using their rental fleet within the city as often as you like (30 minutes of biking included in every lending process, afterwards extra fees apply). (No affiliation) If you are interested in taking longer trips outside the city, buying a used bike and selling it later is your best ...


10

Thalys is a special case, other trains between France and Germany are usable with a regular German ticket - e.g. TGV are treated exactly the same as ICE as long as you're not leaving Germany (and vice versa in France). Just as an addition, there are additional options: You can directly book a ticket with a lay-over in Köln. Deutsche Bahn allows for this ...


9

You will need a separate ticket for the RE. Thalys and Deutsche Bahn (German Railways) are different companies and you cannot use a Thalys ticket for RE.


1

In 2008, I shipped a bicycle from Germany to Sweden. I don't remember the exact price but at the time it cost me less than €50. I did this primarily because I was moving to a small Swedish town in winter and was unsure if I would be able to buy a bicycle locally. If you fly to Germany (which seems very likely), you can bring your bicycle on the plane (...


4

Another recent option is a Swapfiets. You pay a monthly fee of currently 17.50 Euros (15 for students) and get a decent bike, repairs included. Contract duration is one month. They're not sport bikes, but should be sufficient for inner-city transportation and occasional longer trips. (No affiliation, I just think this is one of the cases where their offer ...


9

What is your citizenship? You may be required to bring money for your stay but not required to actually spend it. If you are an EU/EEA citizen, you have rather strong rights to stay. If you need a visa, being found homeless may complicate your next application. It is not illegal to be homeless in Germany. You may be asked to move from some places, notably ...


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