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65

It's the number one, with a left-hand stroke, and is not uncommon in European countries, including France. This from Wikipedia on Regional Handwriting Variation, (including the illustration): The numeral 1 — This numeral is sometimes written with a serif at the top extending downward and to the left. People in some parts of Europe extend this stroke ...


27

It's a common problem I had in South America - I really wanted to improve my Spanish while travelling as it gives you a much better insight into your travels, and can talk to locals more. But so often they'd just switch to English because they welcomed a chance to learn English themselves. You can either do the obvious (ask them to speak French so you can ...


26

I was in Montreal a few months ago, and I was worried about this. I tried my best to learn some French through podcasts (Coffee Break French - I really liked Coffee Break Spanish), but I still felt like I was floundering. Be aware though, that just 10 words can get you very far, if they're the right words. Hello, Goodbye, Please, Thank you, Yes, No, "...


20

It's just the number "one". It's not a French specificity, in continental Europe (and in most countries with (Continental) European influence) we (almost) never handwrite the number "1" as "I" like english-speaking people do. Also, we usually handwrite 7 with a middle bar so there is no mistaking possible.


17

Just ask them. If they switch to english, say: "S'il vous plaît, en français, j'essaie d'apprendre."


12

To answer your question, it is useful but not that important. You are correct in saying that the majority of people in Montreal understand English. The majority also understand French too. You will also find that there are many people who live here which speak neither of these languages and have been in Montreal for a decade or more! You should be prepared ...


7

One thing you could try: Learn a few phrases in an obscure third language. I speak Romanian, for instance. So if I'm in France and trying to learn French, and they reply in English, I just give them a polite but blank look and say, Îmi pare rău, nu înțeleg. Of course, the risk is that they'll decide that you're not worth the trouble. So it just depends ...


6

I got mugged when living in France. The phrase I remember them using during that experience was "vide les poches" (empty your pockets). However, I'd agree with the comments on the original question, the fact that someone is trying to mug you should be apparent regardless of your competence in the language. Beggars will be persistent, sure, but it's very ...


6

Given that you're a jazz pianist, one fun (and Paris-specific) way to make friends could be to play one of the many pianos available in public places. Those would be, e.g., all major train stations and some malls (Les Halles has one). There's always people listening and appreciating your music, often chatting you up after you stop playing. There's people ...


6

Because the writing of numbers varies between anglophone and continental countries, I have written down the different variation of numbers I myself encountered in Europe (The third 6 is a write error): As you can see, most of the problems arise with 1, 4, 6, 7 and 9. The first column is how I personally write the numbers (German). Both 1 and 4 can have a ...


5

This is probably a batch or sequence number. This is used before the delivery to sort the cards.


4

Don't stress about it too much. Sometimes I have to remind myself that learning a language is a means to an end, rather an end in itself. You didn't go to France in order to learn French, you learnt French in order to go to France. Beware of the sunk cost fallacy - don't let the time and effort spent learning French unduly influence whether or not you use ...


4

Tanger-Med is the Tangiers harbour. Tanger GR stands for Gare Routière which is french for Central Bus Station. It can be found here according to google maps. The other Tanger stop is apparently some other bus station in Tangiers, according to this tripadvisor thread. It could very well be the CTM terminal in Tangiers. Indeed, the Wikivoyage page on Tangier ...


4

This PDF looks to me like standard French school-writing. Here's an copy-and-paste of what it says the hand-written numbers should look like: So you're seeing a (quite well-formed) 1 -- the photograph in the question shows the ascender on the left (correctly) starting about half-way-up. ... which I find easy to recognise as a 1 (and a good argument for ...


3

Does this mean my application has been rejected, has processed without the requested document? It certainly doesn't mean that your application has been rejected. It does seem as though they are proceeding with the processing of your application without waiting for the requested document, and that does not bode well for the eventual outcome of the ...


3

I, too, am an introvert, and when I was younger, I moved to the US whilst knowing nearly no-one there. I play trombone, so I took my instrument, and pretty much the first thing I did was find ensembles to play in. 25 years later, most of the friends from that time that I'm still in touch with are the ones I made in those ensembles (plus you heroic ...


2

I know there is already an accepted answer, but I thought I'd throw in my two cents anyways. My advice - just keep speaking in French. Be more insistent than they are. If they continue to attempt to speak in English just say something along the lines of: "Would you mind if I continue practising my French?" There's a chance, of course, that they will not ...


1

You could try meeting people through Meetup, for example there are lots of music-related Meetup groups in Paris but there will also be others related to art, politics and philosophy.


1

The UK government has an excellent tool(click here) to see if you need a visa. I did a check on a citizenship that usually requires a visa to transit in the UK and will not be leaving the airport. Exemptions You don’t need a visa if you have one of the following: a visa for Canada, New Zealand, Australia or the USA (this can be used for ...


1

From my experience it may be because your French is not good enough and it causes pain to their ears and some actual comprehension difficulty. On several occasions I have found myself in France with Anglophone companions who had no problem speaking with locals, whereas the locals rather preferred English when speaking with me. I do not take this as an ...


1

Wow this is very interesting, what happens to me and everyone I know in Paris is the exact opposite. I speak English and they reply in French always, in fact i stopped going to paris for that reason. No matter how many times I say I don’t speak French they just insist to, and what kills me is that they clearly understand me so they know English but I don’t ...


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