95

Answer Can I get financial compensation? Can you first quantify in euros how much damage you suffered from detention? If yes, consult a lawyer asking if there is any rule granting you compensation. If no, you can't demand anything. Quantification can be done by any means, like missed connection and suffered costs. Despite any formula, you need a ...


64

I'd say the chance to get any kind of financial compensation is low. There is no compensation provision in Schengen Borders Code, and I doubt there is one in the Italian national law. You can pursue the court case against them, but note that even Article 8 gives the border officials leeway: However, on a non-systematic basis, when carrying out minimum ...


31

I think you are out of luck because in my understanding, the officer was right and you were wrong. Well, the officer is always right to begin with, but in this case, he really is. You correctly state that as an EU citizen you have the right to move freely within the territory of the Member States and need nothing but an ID card. Ukraine is not a member ...


14

The freedom of movement rules are promulgated as a directive which means it is up to each member state to flesh them out in its own laws. As such, it differs considerably between member states which registration requirements they impose on EU/EEA citizens -- and where they do, they don't have to use the same detailed criteria for when the registration ...


10

Yes, they can, indefinitely. However, the penalty for staying longer than three months without registering (not "90 days") must be proportional to the penalty imposed upon a country's own citizens for not registering. In particular, they cannot be deported. In most countries this is a fine; in others there's no penalty at all. There seems to be no rule about ...


10

Freedom of movement does not imply freedom from immigration inspection. The border agent may ask you whatever they want, including nothing at all. Freedom of movement is about the right to travel to, live and work in another member state without the administrative issues of visas and work permits, etc. Freedom of movement is not absolute, either. If you are ...


9

The card does really need to say "family member of a union/EEA citizen" before it has any effect for the UK. Those cards are only supposed to be issued when the union citizen lives in a different member state than the one of his citizenship, which is why your card does not say that. Even if you had one of those cards, the UK have been sort of reluctant to ...


8

According to https://www.udi.no/en/word-definitions/registration-certificate-for-eueea-nationals/ you need to register with the police as an EEA national living in Norway for more than three months. It says explicitly that you need to register only once, so presumably it will not be a problem that you move around within norway after having registered. (The ...


8

You are a citizen of the European Union and as such enjoy freedom of movement within the borders of the EU. This is an absolutely fundamental right and nothing can curb it. Edit: even if you had a UK criminal record, that in itself would not be enough. Here are some relevant passages from the Free Movement Directive: Restrictions on the right of entry ...


8

For EU citizens: According to the Slovenian Ministry of the Interior: If you are a member of a EU and EEA country you may enter the Republic of Slovenia with a valid identity card or a valid passport and you are not required to obtain an entry permit, i.e. a visa or a residence permit. For the first three months after entry, you may stay without ...


8

British Citizens (which I presume you are) do not need a Visa, or any documentation other than a passport valid for the duration of your intended stay. Moreover, as an EU citizen, your rights under EU freedom of movement allow you to stay for up to three months as a visitor, and as long as you wish provided you are working, or can demonstrate that you are ...


7

According to the text of the EU freedom of movement and residence law summary: European Union citizens have the right to move freely and live in another EU country, subject to any conditions set out in the EU’s treaties. This free movement of people is one of the EU’s fundamental principles. EU citizens with a valid identity card or passport may: ...


7

There appears to be a difference between registering your presence, and registering your residence. The former is allowed within the first 3 months, the latter is not. Directive 2004/38/EC, Article 5 The Member State may require the person concerned to report his/her presence within its territory within a reasonable and non-discriminatory period ...


7

From your "the site" link, it appears that family permit applications cannot receive any more priority than they already have because of the directive and/or regulations: EEA Family Permit applicants are not required to purchase priority services. EEA Family Permit applications are considered priority, free of any additional charge.


7

I assume that you're actually a citizen of Australia, not just a resident, since that seems to be the interpretation under which the rest of the question makes the most sense. If that assumption is incorrect, please leave a comment on this answer, and I will change it as appropriate. The UK residence permit has no bearing on your ability to spend time in ...


7

I don't think you have any chance here. Generalizing your problem: The basic premise, opposite of what happens now would be that, if you were delayed in a security queue by the officer you would get a compensation for that. The practical result of such rule would be that the border police would be pressured to avoid any delays to cut down any costs. And, ...


6

Your card is not an article 20 card, because those are issued to people whose family member lives in an EU/EFTA state other than that of their nationality. Your wife is Latvian and lives in Latvia, so you don't qualify. As such, you'll need an EEA Family Permit for the UK, and an equivalent visa for Ireland.


6

EU/EFTA countries except Switzerland This rule is extremely flawed altogether: as Schengen countries don't record movements between them (even when internal border checks do take place, most commonly when entering Sweden or Switzerland by bus), there's no way to track someone's presence in one member state vs. another. Furthermore, an EU/Schengen citizen ...


6

As a EU citizen, you are entitled to visa free entry throughout the EU. You need proof that you are an EU citizen, and the easiest way to provide this is with your passport. Furthermore, as a UK citizen, you enjoy visa free access to 83 countries - not including those in the EU. It is safe to say, you enjoy a great deal of freedom of movement even outside ...


6

Is it possible to get into England without an end date? (I will look for a job and stay there if I can, maybe one or two years.) Yes. As an Italian citizen, you enjoy freedom of movement in the entire EU, which allows you to move to the UK indefinitely. After the UK leaves the EU, those EU citizens who arrived before a certain date will be able to remain ...


6

When you're asked a question, you give more information to a trained examiner than simply what's in your answer. Your tone of voice, degree of eye contact, your body language and facial expressions, how long you take to give an answer: all these and more communicate information. El Al famously extensively train their security personnel to pick up on and ...


5

If your permesso di soggiorno says "Carta di soggiorno per familiari di cittadino dell'Unione" or anything like that then you can go without a visa. If it does not say that, then you will need an EEA family permit.


4

No you don't need a visa. Do you need a visa? : If you are a British citizen or from another EU country, you only need a valid passport or ID for the whole length of your stay in France. source


4

Specifically for Denmark, see http://www.nyidanmark.dk/en-us/coming_to_dk/eu_and_nordic_citizens/eu-eea_citizens/residence_in_denmark_for_union_citizens_and_eea_nationals.htm. This is the official government-run immigration website, and its information is trustworthy. You're supposed to apply for a registration certificate if you stay in Denmark for more ...


4

Italy is part of the Schengen travel zone and so is Austria. The UK is not. A non-EU/EEA resident of one Schengen country can visit all other Schengen countries under the 90/180 rule, that is no more than 90 days out of the previous 180 days. This condition must be fulfilled every single day. There is no reset. After 90 days in, you must stay 90 days out. ...


4

As @phoog says, yes, you can do that. And contrary to what it seems to be at the first glance, the country you repeatedly enter may be totally fine with this: Remember that for the 90 day period in country B (unless you register) your country of residence A basically stays responsible wrt. social insurance. E.g. if I being German with previous residence ...


4

With an Italian passport, you can use the E-gates at UK airports and won't need to speak to a Border Force Officer.


3

Only if you're already in the UK or you're travelling with them. In that case they can enter by presenting their passport and residence card.


3

There are four avenues available to you. You can pursue them simultaneously. Write to the entry clearance manager (ECM) and ask informally for a review of the decision Appeal the refusal File a new application Enter by train or ferry without an EEA family permit Informal review The UK's guidance changed a couple of years ago, but if you follow it through,...


3

For later readers... We travelled from Amsterdam Central, on the train, to St. Anton am Alberg in Austria, via Koln in Germany. There were no passport checks along the way, and no ID required apart from my girlfriend had to present the credit card she bought the international train tickets with, on the DB (German trains). Thanks for everyone's input. ...


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