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36

Currently, Schengen States do not have a central database in which entries/exits are recorded. The evaluation is soley done by physically checking the stamps in your passport. Such a system is however in the process of being implementened: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/HTML/?uri=CELEX:32017R2226&from=DE I would not worry too much about ...


25

The situation is complex and quite variable. If the delivery is done by La Poste (the incumbent postal service), they usually have access to those mailboxes (they have the RFID equivalent of a master key, as well as master keys to open the mailboxes to deliver parcels in them, if they are standard mailboxes). The exception is if there’s a concierge, in ...


16

Amazon has an option to deliver your packages to "relays" or "points de retrait" - usually gas stations and small shops can act like one, but there are dedicated places too. You get your package there free of charge, at the store's opening hours. You will need a valid ID to pick it up. If the item you want is not eligible for such delivery, you can usually ...


16

The only record they keep is the stamps in your passport. You can use the UK entry stamp to prove that you left. There's nothing to worry about.


14

It depends on your fare, some TGV tickets can be changed, some can be changed for a small fee up to two days before travel, others yet cannot or not without a hefty fee. If your fare allows it and seats are available, it could be possible to change the date and time without additional fee. Additionally, there are very few TGV from CDG to Rennes (one a day, ...


12

No need to worry about this mishap. The Schengen Borders Code provides a mechanism with how to deal with this and what is acceptable evidence of having exited: The travel documents of non-EU nationals are systematically stamped upon entry and exit. If a travel document does not bear an entry stamp, it may be presumed that the holder does not fulfil, or ...


12

It seems that there is no direct option From this quite old (2012) discussion on Le Routard.com (the website of a popular French tourist guide), there is no direct ferry route between Bretagne and Portugal. Ferries goes to Spain, in Gijon or Bilbao for example. This website confirms it was still the case in 2015. This makes sense, as Portuguese main cities,...


11

Don't waste your time and a lot of money to change your TGV ticket. At CDG jump on Les BusDirect #4 for 17€ and get off at Montparnass Gare and board your TGV to Rennes without hassle. Bon voyages. Les Bus Direct enter link description here


10

The ferry you chose before was a 21 hour ride. The trip you imagine would be twice that, nowhere within sight of land (except on the Spanish end), and through not particularly polite seas. Regardless, that ride does not exist. I concur with not driving, having just done a driving trip twice that long myself, it would be a 2-day trip if you push, when ...


9

In my residence, I have exactly the same case. Mail boxes are too small (aperture is designed for letters only) and are accessible from within the building for which the external door is always kept close for security reasons (accessed through physical key or RFID wireless key by residents). I will tell you what happens with Amazon delivery based on my ...


7

It's hard prove a negative, but: Nantes to Lisbon is a two hour flight, easyJet, Transavia and Air France all do it, can't imagine there being a high demand for a ship this way. Even the Saint Nazaire-Gijon route was suspended five years ago and that's much shorter. That year is no coincidence -- the Perpignan–Barcelona high speed rail line opened in 2013 ...


6

As people expected, I have completed the trip and it was absolutely no problem whatsoever.


6

The train from Montparnasse to Rennes and the train from Charles de Gaulle to Rennes are different trains, so you are looking to change the booking entirely. Depending on the ticket type you booked, you may be able to get a refund on the original ticket and book a new one. If it is "Modifiable sous conditions", then you should be able to get a refund (...


5

You need to change your ticket, this can be done online if you have an e-ticket, the penalty ammount will be displayed there: A exchange quote will be displayed together with any penalties. On validation, a confirmation email will be sent to the email address you provided during exchange. After completing your ticket exchange online, you will be ...


5

Your options include: Le Bus Direct line 4, which will get you directly from CDG to Gare Montparnasse in about 1h30, depending on traffic. Cost is 18 euros. RER B from CDG to Denfert-Rochereau, then line 6 to Gare Montparnasse. A bit cheaper (10,30€, the ticket is valid to any metro station), and not dependent on traffic, but you need to change trains, with ...


4

Uruguay uses 220V at 50Hz mains power supply similarly to European countries. The plugs are mostly type F, commonly known as Schuko: Or type C, commonly known as Europlugs: Coming from France, this means that in most cases you will not need an adaptor. However, you might find other types of sockets - type I and type L - for which an adaptor is required. ...


3

The site for the plan you linked to has a "Recharger" link on it, unfortunately it is only in French. That would suggest that it can actually be topped off, you'd need to try. I think it would be the way to go instead of a second party website. The translation by Google suggests that you'd need to put in your number and then get possible payment options, I'...


3

The common format residence permit is indeed a red and blue (or pink and purple, depending on the ambient lighting) card with a bull and stars. Older ones will not have a chip, but they remain valid even without a chip. France added the chip to theirs in June 2011. France residence permits after and before June 2011: Image source: Government of France You ...


3

A solution that might help you is called Poste restante, meaning Staying at the post office. The trick is to give as your address, your name followed by the mention "Poste restante" and the address of a specific post office near you. The letter or package will be delivered to this office and you will be able to get it by presenting an ID. As an example, you ...


3

Note that even though Chronoposte looks like it's a service from the post office, it's actually entirely run by contractors (down to sub-sub-sub contractors..) and behaves quite differently from the post office. Especially in terms of delivery, and especially to residential addresses. If you want the full benefit of post office service, be sure to use ...


2

Not really an answer, but I thought I'd comment on what I ended up doing: For most of the expenses, I paid cash using euros that I withdrew using my US cards. The exchange rate was fair, and there was little fee (ranging from $1 to $5 per withdraw, but some of the fees were actually refunded at the end of the month). For some (larger) expenses, I paid using ...


2

Some online banks provide the solutions you need, like WeSwap or Revolut : For less than $10, you can get a Mastercard, top it up in your local currency and spend it in (almost) any foreign currencies. I have one of them and I already bought a SNCF train ticket with it (and also some flight tickets in EU), I never get any trouble.


2

In France, the parcel will never, ever be left on the street. By the way, do not worry about the gate code, I think every pizza store has every gate code in the country already.


2

There are two aspects to the answer: 1) EU rules require non-EU family members to carry a valid passport https://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/travel/entry-exit/non-eu-family/index_en.htm 2) Even if you had your passport, you need a Schengen visa for France unless your residence card is a "Family member of an EU citizen" residence card. Can I travel to ...


2

It is not uncommon for French campsites to ask for a deposit which will be returned at the end of your stay: Caution La plupart des campings demandent le dépôt d’une caution. Cette caution, qui varie généralement de 50 € à 300 € selon le camping, devra être réglée en euros ou en monnaie locale et, la plupart du temps, en espèces, même sur les ...


1

Apparently it is indeed only valid for 14 days (aka it is dead now), previously we had prepayed card (refillable) that you could find in any bureau de tabac but I am not sure wether it still exist.


1

Check out the answer to this link. I also posted the answer I got from the Austrian Ministry of the Interior (office responsible for border Control).


1

You should apply for a type C short-term visa. Unlike some other countries, the Schengen area does not have strictly defined visa categories. When applying, categories are there to help processing, your visa will not mention for example “study” or “tourism”. Since Schengen does not have an 'Academic' category, you should select the category that best ...


1

Old question but I see no one answered so I'm going to add some information I believe is pertinent. I received the following email from the Austrian BMI regarding entering visa-fee before a Visa D is valid. Keep in mind this is a translation from the original email in german: If the visa-free stay is short or the travel purpose for the visa-free stay is ...


1

Turning my comment into an answer. Life and plans change, so it is common not to fly on the original dates (especially if you acquired a visa long before your travel date). The visa is in general still valid, until the expiration date. Note: there are two kind of validity periods (visa, not passports): the last date you can use the visa to enter and then ...


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