52

First, if it fits in or as a carry-on and you can manage it, I highly recommend you keep it with you. Many airlines will offer a carry-on limit exemption for medical devices though you may have to contact them prior to note the record. This may even get you early boarding if you don't otherwise qualify. Second, if you must check it, insure it either with ...


40

The original packaging boxes are a good place to begin; your monitor survived its journey from the factory to your house in that box. Your main concern will be about protecting the box from other items falling onto the box, which you can mitigate by storing the monitor in a hard-shell case if possible. (I don't bother with this for wine.) It is also worth ...


37

Think about what your luggage goes through from the time you check it until you get it back. It travels on automatic conveyor belts. In many situations, it must be shunted from one conveyor belt to another. This is done by machines, not humans. The machines cannot see the "fragile" tag. It is moved from conveyor-belt to dolly by a human. The human may, or ...


30

As an airport security staff member I can comment and advise on this topic: 'Fragile' items should be taken to your designated ‘CHECK-IN desk’ where they are usually weighed and directed to the alternative 'out of gauge' screening facility, often used for declared genuine fragile items such as very large passenger cases, bike boxes, large tool or camera ...


27

Although I haven't brought champagne in checked luggage, I have brought wine on multiple occasions. (Typically bringing it home from places with nice wine.) I roll a nice soft Tshirt around it tightly, and if I have two bottles (which might clink against each other) then after each is rolled in a shirt I wrap the two of them together in another shirt or ...


25

The best it to have the original box. This usually comes with styrofoam that fit the shape exactly of the monitor. Within it the monitor is inside a large anti-static bag and I plastic wrap the box for protection in case it gets wet. As thing would have it, this year I travelled twice with 2 monitors. One was in its original box since still had it. Nothing ...


23

Let's put it this way: it doesn't hurt. The terms & conditions of any airline will already disclaim as much responsibility as possible for any luggage damaged in transit, the waiver is just an extra bit of legal ass-covering with the helpful side effect of (hopefully) making it clear to the passenger that the "fragile" tag is best effort, not a ...


22

Ignoring things like aesthetics, personal taste, etc, it's more or less what you said: you seem to be trading protection against pressure for protection against being thrown around ...but of course you can mitigate the loss of protection against being thrown around by packing strategically to fill the space and use soft items to protect fragile items (e....


20

Socks, put the beers in socks and/or roll them in your own cloths. On a side note, I would not put a laptop in check-in luggage if possible. Take it with you as a carry-on.


19

I usually go cheap and just wrap each bottle in half a dozen plastic shopping bags, one bag at a time. That way there's lots of air trapped in them, not unlike bubble wrap. Then I tuck those puffy, plastic bundles in the middle of my t-shirts or something.


16

Yes, you can check in anything you like as long as the airline is reasonably assured that a) it contains nothing nefarious/dangerous, and b) will survive the trip without disintegrating into bits along the way. However, what are you hoping to accomplish with the bubble wrap? The original cardboard box and its Styrofoam inserts have already been designed to ...


16

I quite often fly with a CPAP machine in my checked luggage (and less often as carry-on), and I've never had a problem with it. I will be doing so later today, and don't anticipate any problems (unless the maple syrup in my luggage leaks everywhere, in which case I'm stuffed). Johns-305's answer is much the best option (+1 from me); when I have to fly with ...


14

Some crazy variant: put your bottle into the bag, after that place it into the box, and add the polyurethane foam: It'll save your bottle, and after the flight you can easily remove it with knife.


14

The TSA Can I Bring?, impressively, has entries for both Balloons (inflated) and Balloon (uninflated). For Balloon (inflated) it says: You may transport this items in carry-on or checked baggage. For items you wish to carry on, you should check with the airline to ensure that the item will fit in the overhead bin or underneath the seat of the airplane. ...


13

We have packed a few bottles in tough cardboard tubes over the years, padding inside so they can't rattle and then we wrap the whole thing in a couple of garbage bags just in case the worst happens. They've always arrived intact.


12

Security would be one reason, as can be seen on this forum thread when an unscrupulous airport employee tried real hard to get inside the bag: I do not think there's any softshell that would've protected its contents against such an attempt. Another reason would be caring for the bag itself. One my bags once developed a tear from what was clearly dragging ...


11

You need to be aware that you have a risk of about 2 to 3 in 1000 of a bag being lost or delayed. If not having the medical equipment for a few days would be a serious problem, that may be an unacceptably high risk. If so, make arrangements with the airline to carry it on as essential medical equipment.


10

Video game consoles are actually not very sensitive. Game discs or cartridges even less so. If you want to be safe, I'd do similar to what you said: carry on the two consoles (but not the cords, controllers, etc.) and the tablet. Everything else can be checked without much concern. Security will likely require the consoles and tablet to be removed from ...


9

In a hardcase of some kind with foam inside. They are rather expensive but then again you can use them forever and for many different things. I use it for computer and photo equipment. I put the case inside of my normal luggage, not as a separate item. But if your airline has nicer rules than most you might just add a few bucks and get away with shipping ...


9

There's a great guide on how to fly with motorcycle gear psoted on Ride Apart, which goes through all the questions you asked point by point. Starting with the type of luggage, it suggests a duffel bag, small enough to be considered a carry-on, and large enough to fit all your gear. You don't have to buy this exact bag, but you might want to find a similar ...


9

One consideration is protecting the bottle, and other posters have suggested socks, clothes, or bubble wrap for this - perfectly sensible. However, you may also be interested in protecting the contents of your suitcase in the event of a leak. I'm more experienced transporting wine than beer, but the same principles apply: pressure changes may cause liquids ...


8

San Francisco to Newark, two bottles of wine, wrapped in multiple shirts and packed in the middle of the luggage. I didn't worry too much about bagging them, because if the bottles break they are likely to cut the bags. Also, with 6 hours in flight the liquid is going to get out anyway if something goes wrong.


8

I did this a few years ago from the UK to New Zealand. It's actually not as hard as it sounds. You can go the pro-way and use professional transportation foam, but if you have any bubble wrap lying around, that can be a handy alternative. Myself, I wrapped all my shirts around the bottle. It becomes surprisingly snug and very unlikely to move, and has a ...


8

I successfully managed to bring a 24" monitor home by air traveling, in 2011. This one: But of course not in its original, unopened box. Right after I bought it, I was a bit worried: "how could I bring this bad boy home? I definitely don't want to check it. Even with the fragile tag, the panel is way, way too large and too delicate to travel together with ...


7

The official website of Stuttgart airport (STR) lists a service they call Wrap&Fly. Opening hours according to the website are Monday through Sunday 5.30am to 6pm. The service is located at Terminal 3, Level 3.


7

Socks as @max said are a great idea. Tons Plastic bubble wrap ( that's what i did). all my guiness bottles and cans sustained a high atmospheric flight due to a storm from dublin to barcelona without breaking, loosing gas , or opening alone, and had a good taste afterwards. Plus, if something breaks inside a big bubble wrap ball, nothing else will soak. ...


6

I would say that they do nothing. As an example, this Jetstar page explains has a list of things that you should not include in your checked bagage which includes fragile items. I can not imagine that you would find an airline that would make any sort of promise that they are going to treat your baggage gently. There would be little reason for any airline ...


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