Hot answers tagged

30

Update December 2018 The Sauna is currently closed, as part of the wider Finnair non-Schengen lounge refurbishment. Lounge staff tell me it'll re-open lovely and refreshed in the spring There really is a sauna in the lounge! It's only in the non-Schengen lounge. It's somewhat hidden, tucked away in the middle of the non-Schengen lounge complex, and anyone ...


29

According to Wizz Air's Onboard Services: We accept cash payments in different currencies. Euros British Pounds (notes only) Hungarian Forint on Hungarian flights Zloty on Polish flights All prices are quoted in Euros as the base currency. The prices in Pounds, Forint and Zloty are indicative prices subject to the ...


28

Treriksröset is not reachable by road. You can get there on foot or ski (perhaps kayak too but there may be some rapids to navigate upstream). Mountain-bike may work (I'm not sure). From your screenshot it appears Google Maps knows the trail on the Norwegian side, but not the shorter and much more popular hiking trail on the Finnish side. Openstreetmap ...


25

You should be fine. If you're asked, you should mention that you're working as an interpreter and that's the reason for your stay. There shouldn't be any issues since interpreters are free to work without visa. The Ministry for Foreign Affairs of Finland states that you don't need a visa. And, according to Finnish Immigration Service, Finland allows ...


24

I don't know if boarding a freighter by asking around in the port or approaching the ship's captain is still possible nowadays, many things I read suggest it is not. In a large port like Rotterdam, there is also no way to get anywhere near most ships without a car and some credentials. On the other hand, there are many opportunities to travel on a freighter ...


22

You can follow many vessels worldwide through vessel finder websites, such as vesselfinder.com or marinetraffic.com. The websites are free for basic use, not unlike airline tracking websites. This will allow you to see where the vessel is right now. Specifically, you can follow the WASA EXPRESS. It is apparently due in Holmsund next at 2018-11-29 12:30 ...


21

The Danish police and the Schengen calculator are right, and the Finnish border guard must be severely confused about the rules he's supposed to administer. (It sounds to me as if he thought a 6-month period started when she entered on July 1, and that she would need to be present at the border for some formalities when the next 6-month period starts. That ...


19

Certainly, there are lots of campsites in Finland. Even better, Finland has the concept of 'jokamiehenoikeus' or freedom to roam, and : "One may stay or set up camp temporarily in the countryside, a reasonable distance from homes, pick mineral samples, wild berries, mushrooms and flowers (as long as they are not protected species)." What you might ...


18

In short, no. Even the Yrjönkatu pool is a bit of a historical quirk that has probably survived largely thanks to general conservatism (it's Finland's oldest and operated very much the way it did in 1928) and patronage from Helsinki's gay district Eerikinkatu (conveniently located right next door) — no, it's not a gay club or anything, but even ...


17

No, there are no passenger trains between Finland and Sweden. There is actually a train line crossing the border between Haparanda and Tornio, but it is currently (since 1988) only used by freight trains. Coming from Sweden, you could take a train to Luleå, from which you have to bridge about 160km on the bus to Kemi, where you will have access to the ...


17

This heavily depends on the type of train you are planning to use. In general there are 5 different type of trains you can use with your Interrail/Eurail pass regional trains which are included in a pass and no reservations are possible trains with reservations available but not compulsory. If you don't buy such a reservation before boarding the train you ...


16

As Ilmari commented, the recent NY Times travel blog post by "frugaltraveler" is very good. It even mentions my favorite bar, Pub Magneetti. I like his other recommendations too: free concerts & somewhat hippie atmosphere at Alppipuisto; public sauna in Kallio; berry-picking). Some more ideas below. Many of these may not be "only in Helsinki" things, ...


16

Within Rovaniemi itself, the bus network seems to be quite good considering its (small — except by Finnish standards) size. The route to the Arctic Circle where Santa Claus Village is (Napapiiri) is operated roughly hourly on weekdays. Departures are a lot less frequent on weekends though, and buses stop operating in the evening (something like 6 p.m. as per ...


13

You should consult the SpeedingEurope page to see the fines laid out in per-day amounts, where the lowest is 6 EUR / day. The police will work with that amount with a tourist, see this Reddit post: The law says you're supposed to report your real income and the fine is based on that. In practise you'll get the minimum fine since there is no way to check ...


12

As a Chinese national, you can stay within Helsinki airport up to 24 hours whilst in transit without a visa - however you will need to remain in the international "air-side" area. There are two hotels in the airport (GLO and Hilton), however both are outside of security so you will not be able to access them without a visa. There are also a number of other ...


12

According to Wikipedia: It was inspired by Ängsmarn, a family retreat in Sweden, which is also situated on a grassy field facing the sea and surrounded by rocky outcrops. The Finnish page seems to indicate that the estate is on Blidö.


12

I suggest to use the passport which would be used on arrival, so for a way to Saint Petersburg it will be South-African, and for a way to Helsinki it will be Swedish one. This should work fine, as the most interested side for getting one's passport info is "accepting" country.


11

Because you are an EU national you have the right of free movement inside EU. The national ID card is enough, the portuguese one is called Cartão de Cidadão.


11

Yes, you can. Finland is part of the Schengen Area, which means US passport holders may enter without requiring a visa for up to 90 days within any 180 day period.


11

Swedish is an official language along with Finnish at the national level, and in most coastal areas on the municipal level. Turku is an officially bilingual municipality, with a majority of native Finnish speakers. Although everyone in Finland (even in officially monolingual areas) learns the other language in school, proficiency in Swedish among native ...


10

If you were willing to pay approx. 8–9 euros for lunch, there would be lots of good options. For example: Satkar Kamppi (Nepalese restaurant, tripadvisor, home page): vegetarian options in the lunch menu for 8.40 euros. Note that the quoted prices in the lunch menus are precisely what you will pay (assuming you drink water). There are no additional taxes ...


10

Daffodils are in Northern Europe thought to be flowers related to Easter. As Easter is this week, that's probably the reason for the large amount of these flowers. The flower is often called 'pääsiäislilja', freely translated to 'Easter lily' in Finnish.


9

Yes, as long as you have a valid multiple entry Schengen visa, you can enter and exit the Schengen territory as many times as you want. Which in this case means you're allowed to fly from the UK to Finland. Of course, you need to have a separate visa for the UK if you need one.


9

Each playroom coach have 4 regular seats that can be reserved, no surcharge applies. Just book your ticket normally at the VR Shop, making sure to select one of the trains equipped with a playroom of course. Look for the little teddy bear icon next to Services: Then "continue to seat selection", and request a seat "Next to Playroom": Note that you don't ...


9

There's no rule saying that people who host international guests in their home need to be employed; it is hard to see how that would factor into the decision process for a visa. Note well that "being invited by a citizen" does not in itself make visa officers any more likely to accept the application than they would be if you were just going for a tourist ...


8

Legally you can, although you will have to convince the officer at the border control that you have clear intentions of leaving to Finland very soon and your visit to Germany is definitely temporary. Your residence permit in Finland allows staying in other Schengen countries up to 90 days of any 180-day period.


8

According to EGTRE, the single rail border crossing between Sweden and Finland carries freight only. Sweden and Finland use different track gauges, and freight is transshipped between Swedish and Finnish cars in Haparanda. The line across the border is dual-gauge, but according to EGTRE the standard-gauge track does not see regular use.


8

I fear you may be drastically underestimating how long this drive is, so it is possible this QA is not of much help to you. It will take you, at the minimum, five overnight stops in hotels. Normally it will take "ten days" for a drive like this if you have children. (Note too that it will cost about 1000- in fuel and motoring costs, and say 1000-2000 for ...


8

I'm not Finnish, but I've travelled around there once very recently, and had a relatively similar experience, so I feel that I should be able to have a stab at answering. Don't take my word as gospel though! I actually managed to book the hypoallergenic seats by accident (when I went through the normal seat booking process and selected a compartment, it ...


7

You will almost certainly be better off buying a separate SIM for each country. This may change in the next few years as roaming charges may be eliminated completely within the EU, but for now separate SIMs for each country is the best option. Personally, I use the following : In the UK, I use O2. The SIM is "free" and available from any number of shops, ...


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