51

A cancellation implies a refund, and the fee eats into that. It's really that simple. The only reason to bother cancelling a ticket is that you want you money back. (Possibly only the airport charges and not the nominal fare, but for many low-cost carriers the former is a significant if not major part of the total.) The airlines in general don't want to have ...


28

It really depends and even Booking.com does not know which is why they use the word may. Generally speaking there are additional fees that they either cannot collect or cannot calculate due to complex rules that need more information than provided. Sometimes there are no additional fees at all but often there is something charged by the locality. From the ...


19

As booking.com states, requirements made directly to the hotel, like extra beds, cots for babies or pets allowed at extra pay, will be charged by the hotel. Those are charges you should know about as you requested them or agreed to them. Tourist tax is also to be paid directly to the hotel but is often already mentioned on the booking page. An extra charge ...


18

Imagine a world where there were no change fees, and no cancellation fees. If you bought a ticket and then changed your mind, you could just cancel or change it. In this world, tickets would not be cheaper if you bought them in advance. After all, I could buy a ticket for a year from now then change it the day I was going to fly, and the airline would have ...


14

As it says in the table, to get the discount, you have to have a FasTrak Flex or CAV transponder. These transponders have a switch that you set to indicate the number of occupants. The express lane sensors detect the setting and charge you accordingly. The sensors also apparently transmit this information to police in the area, presumably paired with your ...


14

I think you're obfuscating things by switching from the penalty terminology to the service fee terminology. It is definitely a penalty. The airlines (like any business) would like to have a predictable revenue stream. If you buy your ticket way ahead of time, you're rewarded for helping them achieve a more predictable revenue stream: You get a better price....


10

I think your reasoning is fundamentally flawed. For starters, passengers already have strong incentives to limit layovers (more time spent in transport and more exposure but also higher risk of disruption due to travel restrictions or flight cancellations). That would seem to reduce the pressure on airlines to do anything about it. Importantly, the scenario ...


5

I don't know when and where the limits for aviation have been set and would be interested to learn more about that but I do know a thing or two about ergonomics so here is some relevant background. Legal limits, when they exist are often considerably higher, certainly for men. The International Labour Organisation compiles them and at the end of the 1980s, ...


5

In my experience airlines almost never enforce these limits that precisely. I've been allowed to check bags weighing a little more than the limit on several occasions. When they do enforce the limit precisely, they use the units of measurement that prevail in the place where you are checking in. I have been held strictly to the limit on only two or three ...


4

These Express Lanes (generally known as High-Occupancy Toll lanes, or HOT lanes) don't replace carpool lanes; they enhance them: carpools and other eligible vehicles get in for free (in some locations, carpools with only two people in the car have to pay half price and 3+ are free), and others can pay a toll to use them. The intent is to manage the occupancy ...


4

One important addition to Daniil's answer: the System surcharge fee doesn't apply in case you book throu the Wizz mobile app. (Just tried it.)


4

As of 2020 November the ATMs located at MRT stations around Taipei provided by Cathay United Bank appear to now charge 4% fee of the entire transaction. So $20 to receive $500 plus any fees from the source bank (without specifying any exchange considerations). This is quite unexpected and new within the past 30 days. FamilyMart ATMs currently have a more ...


2

Besides all the other excellent answers, yet another consideration. Cancellations can be used for nefarious purposes. Two that come to mind is credit card fraud and money laundering. These things can be resolved, but dealing with it would cost the airline very substantial amounts of money. So they'd rather not deal with it in the first place, or at least ...


2

The I-539 fee is not a fine. The I-539 form is not primarily intended for the correction of mistakes. The I-539 is the form with which one applies to change or extend nonimmigrant status, and that is what your parents want to do. To make the application, they need to pay the application fee. There is a fee waiver available, but it is only available to ...


2

The terms and conditions are pretty sparse and are not entirely conclusive. See https://www.qatarairways.com/en/travel-with-confidence.html#terms I'm sure there is a more detailed document, but can't find it. Can the passenger cancel the return flight with Qatar Airways and if so, what is the fee if any? You can cancel the return flight. That would qualify ...


1

In my experience they look the weight in the scale, which it is not so precise and it has just one unit. SFO: I expect they will have lb-only scales, and so they would check just this number. I'm not sure they can convert easily the weights. The only problem arrise if you have a domestic flight later (and possibly to a domestic only airport), in a metric ...


1

Santander was my best option. R$20 fee for the withdrawal, and not the exact exchange rate, but consumer mostly takes a small hit. Often times, the ATM machines are out of money or malfunctioning. Like others noted, card cloning is endemic, so monitoring your banking online is prudent.


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