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8

Yes the result can be different for different applicants even if they apply together. Here is one such example.


8

Buy 4 metro tickets (or if you are going to do the same thing on the return trip, you are probably better off buying a « carnet » of 10 tickets — note that those used to be available at the Eurostar bar, not sure if this is still the case). Follow the signs for RER D towards Corbeil or Melun. It’s usually track 44, 3 levels down from Eurostar arrivals. Take ...


7

I don't have a great solution for you, but here are some options, too long for a comment: There's SOLVIT. I suspect that the timeframe of 10 weeks may be longer than you have, but they may be able to resolve the question more quickly than that. (Furthermore, I am unfamiliar with EU law on divergent administrative practices, but the free-movement directive ...


6

Can I travel to the UK on this card without a visa or family permit? Only if you are traveling to the UK with your wife or joining her there. If she will not be in the UK then you need a standard visitor visa. If not, when I apply for the family permit can I send some of my documents in the German language? You have no use for a family permit, because ...


6

I would just share our experience as I had promised. We went to the UK and my husband only needed to show his passport and residence card. He didn't get any stamp at all in his passport. We live in Spain, I'm a Swedish (EU) citizen and he is a non-EU citizen. He have a article 10 residence card from Spain. As I have mentioned in my main post. We traveled ...


5

No, but they can join you in your queue. EU passports can go through digital scanners, so when entering countries like the UK for example, the EU queue is to machines only, if your passport was from a different country and was not eligible to use in the machines then they would not open to let you through. I have gone through non EU passport lines with ...


4

Since you don't have any family members remaining at home while you travel, there's no documentation about that you need to remember to include. That completes your consideration of that item on the checklist. Onward to the next! (The checklist is not a list of documents that every application must contain. It is a list of things you don't want to forget ...


4

Actually, it turns out that the regular hostel search engines do allow you to search for private rooms specifically, and sometimes for family rooms even more specifically. But on all of them you have to do an initial search, and only then can you access the "filters" that let you specify room type. This was not straightforward to me, and I thought I was ...


4

Two points: 1. I called 1-202-325-5120 (number found here: https://esta.cbp.dhs.gov/esta/ ) and was able to speak with someone who said I could travel to the US as a tourist on an ESTA with a return flight. 2. Thank you all for your help! I only made the phone call after reading the advice, that my F1-OPT was definitely done. All makes sense now. Many ...


3

No, switching from a Standard Visit visa to a Family visa while in the UK is not allowed. See under ‘When you cannot get a family visa’ here https://www.gov.uk/uk-family-visa


3

In the UK, for example, a big question is always: "Will this person return to their home country once their permission to stay in the UK runs out". If Mr. X applies, they might say "Mr. X is married to Mrs. X, so he will surely return home to her". If Mr. X and Mrs. X both apply, that reason to return home has disappeared. So it's quite possible that each of ...


2

Both applications had the same result, as both were approved. The wife's application was dependent on the husband's application, so maybe that's way the result was the same.


2

Assuming that the only purpose your mother has for visiting Ireland is to be with you, the only appropriate visa is a Tourist visa, which covers visits to family and friends. Your mother is not a dependent if you, and so cannot apply for a dependent visa in the same way that your spouse or child could. When filling in the forms 'visiting family, would be an ...


2

Only you know why your mother is coming with you. Write that.


2

Is obtaining an EEA family permit enough to be granted an entry to the UK? No. You also need a valid passport, and your spouse must be in the UK already or arriving with you. Does EEA family permit automatically give me the right to work? No. Your right to work flows directly from law, in light of your relationship with an EEA national. Unfortunately, ...


2

When arriving in Geneva on an international flight, you are not able to exit directly to France, but will have to go through Switzerland. Exiting directly to France without going through Switzerland is only possible if you arrive on a flight from a French airport. From the airport's web page: Is it possible to exit directly from the French side when ...


2

You have indicated that your in-laws are not financially dependent on you or your wife. They are also obviously not "members of your household" as they reside in a different country. They therefore do not fall within the scope of Directive 2004/38/EC or of the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2018. They should therefore apply for standard ...


2

There is not a lot online on how pets are considered for ties to home country, but the fact that they are never mentioned in the lists with options shows they are not considered any strong tie. While you feel the dog as a family member, immigration officers do not. Likely out of experience as too many people would not return home to get back to the dog and ...


2

There is no such thing as a ‘family’ application, each person travelling needs to apply separately. Since your family’s visas are dependent on you getting yours, I suggest you wait until you’ve received your decision before submitting the remaining applications, cross-referencing them to your application GWF number. This How should a family with young ...


2

Yes, you can use an EEA family permit for a short trip. My best evidence in support of this assertion is that my mother-in-law has done it. In the free movement directive, there is a "right of residence for up to three months" which does not require anyone to be a "qualified person" (i.e., working, studying, or having demonstrated self-sufficience): this ...


2

Free movement also covers short-term travel, so your being in France is sufficient for this trip to constitute "joining" you. But unless your family relationship falls under the free movement directive, your relative will need a standard Schengen visa with the application requiring the larger set of supporting documents. If you don't live together, it is ...


1

Further to Traveller's Answer, the page linked above contains this text which states the wording that should appear on an Article 10 Residence Card. Article 10 residence card An Article 10 residence card is a document which is issued under EU law (‘the Free Movement Directive’) by EEA Member States to non-EEA family members of EEA nationals who are ...


1

Ask the person at the kiosks. Clearly state that you're both traveling together under different visas and ask what you should do. Make this clear the CBP officer also. The officer will likely want to know why a B1/B2 visa holder are traveling together and will also likely wonder how the start of your visas/travel dates correlate with one another. Since you'...


1

My experience, you will likely need to mention the status of your visa when filing for your kids, but it is possible in principle to avoid that. Rules require that: Both parents file for visa together with kids. Both parents provide copy of their visa. One or both parents submit a note that they allow their kid to travel (this may vary per jurisdiction, in ...


1

As you will be staying with your relative and he will bear a part of the cost, yes, you will have to answer yes on the question: "Will anyone be paying towards the cost of your visit". You will be able to explain who and how much you expect they will spend for you on the form, either in an explanation on this question or in an other part of the form. '...


1

Without your EU family member, you can normally use that card (in combination with your passport) to go anywhere a Schengen residence permit will take you. That includes the Schengen area and all but two of the non-Schengen EU countries. The two countries that are not included are the UK and Ireland. However, in a comment you have indicated that you do ...


1

If I were you, I would (of course) mention the refusal when asked. I would not address the validity of that refusal, nor of the evidence on which it was based, unless asked. For an EEA family permit, you're only supposed to have to establish a limited number of facts: Your identity, The EU, EEA, or Swiss nationality of your family member, Your ...


1

The UK does not care whether you have the same last name or not. Plenty of married couples do not have the same last name. If your wife did legally change her name on marriage but did not change her passport then it might be advisable to include your marriage certificate or another document recording the name change. If you include a marriage certificate ...


1

In addition to @Traveller's answer, I can state that from personal experience you cannot do it. When my wife and I got married, she did enquire with the home office and it was confirmed that she had to leave the UK and apply for the spouse visa from her home country.


1

Your mother qualifies for an EEA family permit to travel with you to the UK only if she is dependent on you. If she is not, then she will need a standard visitor visa. The EEA family permit application is supposed to be decided "quickly"; it shouldn't take more than a week or two. If you have evidence that she is dependent on you, but the decision isn't ...


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