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2

I just noticed today that a self-service checkout in a Swedish supermarket, where you can pay with either card or cash, now had the option to withdraw money from it. It's the first time I've ever seen it and I guess these could be found in the UK, maybe now maybe later. I know Tesco have self service machines that handle cash. So if you are like me, ...


2

While the accepted answer is correct (I use a TransferWise card), the user specifically mentioned Revolut. Revolut provides a debit Mastercard (just like TransferWise) and I have used it across the EU (and in the UK...). TransferWise may be available to users from more countries. My wife (Canadian, non-UK-resident) is not permitted a UK card, and uses my ...


28

Alternatively to an ATM, you can ask for cashback in stores. The way this works is that after scanning your items, you can ask the person at the till for cashback of X amount (normally smaller amounts work better as they might not have enough in the tills/the app of your choice might have a cap), they then add that to the purchase amount, charge the ...


11

There are a few banks that allow you to withdraw from their own ATMs without a card (usually as an "emergency withdrawal service", with a code you get via telephone banking), but other than that, as far as I am aware, you most definitely need a physical card to withdraw from an ATM. You may want to check out Transferwise. They can provide a real Mastercard ...


2

Another way we found to get rid of ripped notes is to find someone who has a bank account in Cambodia then simply put the ripped money into a cash machine that puts it into your bank account, and then take them out immediately. Also, I recommend checking the notes that cash machine gives, we were given ones that had small holes and mold on them, we then ...


3

Cash: You will be expected to pay for things in the local currency 99.5% of the time (THB in Thailand, MYR in Malaysia). Other related fun facts: You should keep about 20-33% in USD initially on arrival to the first country. Exchange the rest into local currency. No big deal to exchange 100% at once, but then you lose with multiple exchanges when you hop ...


0

Without talking about credit card transactions as comments pretty much covered that subject, i personnally prefer to have my trip budget in cash (no suprises, no hidden cost, but you have a shitload of cash on you) and change everything to local currency at the airport (weirdly not always the best rate). I've been to thailand and it's almost the same ...


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