Hot answers tagged

106

You won't win any fashion contests, but that's not what you're aiming for anyway. I can't tell you anything about East Asia, but I've travelled plenty around Europe (including Eastern Europe). Jeans might be more common, but there's absolutely nothing unusual or inappropriate about wearing sweatpants for a flight, regardless of your gender. It certainly won'...


24

I haven't traveled to east Asia or East Europe before but that is a very long flight, I don't think jeans are comfortable at all for that many hours. I have though traveled to central Europe several times and have never worn anything other than sweatpants and nothing has happened, even though they usually don't trust travelers from my country easily. It ...


19

It all depends on where you are from. Being from east Europe myself - we'd put our most official nice clothes for even going to the store literally 2 steps from the house. Having lived in the UK for 8 years now, I've realized how stupid this is, and more importantly, no one cares how you look, in a setting where that is not the most important thing. I'd ...


17

I traveled for Work a lot! I mean a lot. I used to wear Jeans and a Shirt. With the whole getup (belt, nice shoes, etc.). After 50+ trips, I couldn't do it anymore. Not only was I never on-site first day at the client. There was absolutely no reason to wear what I did. You have to take off the belt/watch for the TSA. Untie the nice shoes and whatever else ...


12

It seems that there is no direct option From this quite old (2012) discussion on Le Routard.com (the website of a popular French tourist guide), there is no direct ferry route between Bretagne and Portugal. Ferries goes to Spain, in Gijon or Bilbao for example. This website confirms it was still the case in 2015. This makes sense, as Portuguese main cities,...


10

The ferry you chose before was a 21 hour ride. The trip you imagine would be twice that, nowhere within sight of land (except on the Spanish end), and through not particularly polite seas. Regardless, that ride does not exist. I concur with not driving, having just done a driving trip twice that long myself, it would be a 2-day trip if you push, when ...


7

I have been on various long flights (EU<>Asia, EU<>US) and would recommend you to wear whatever fits you best. Sweatpants are incredibly comfortable, so go for it. What I recommend as well: Wear good shoes, no flipflops or sandals. In the unlikely event of an emergency this might save your life. Take shoes without laces. The same holds true for ...


7

There will usually be stops, either planned stops to drop and pick up passengers or mandatory stops for the driver's breaks. Unfortunately, it's sometimes difficult to know in advance exactly when and how long the bus will stop but 14 hours is a very long time to be driving (and illegal in most places, even outside the EU). I have even seen drivers stop more ...


7

It's hard prove a negative, but: Nantes to Lisbon is a two hour flight, easyJet, Transavia and Air France all do it, can't imagine there being a high demand for a ship this way. Even the Saint Nazaire-Gijon route was suspended five years ago and that's much shorter. That year is no coincidence -- the Perpignan–Barcelona high speed rail line opened in 2013 ...


6

You should be able to look on your banks website (or go in and ask) and see what charges they do for this sort of thing. They probably charge a fixed percent of the amount spent. For example, my bank charges 2% any time I pay in a different currency, where as if I withdraw different currency from a cash machine it charges 1.5% and a £1 fee for withdrawal. So ...


5

No, it is not the cheapest hotel in Europe. There is no clear definition of the difference between e.g. hotels, hostels and bed & breakfasts, but it is not difficult to find cheaper hotel-like lodging on booking.com in other European countries. I just tried a search in Ukraine for an arbitrary date in October and found about 60 offers for €4 per night ...


5

I just completed 3 long Flixbus journeys and this is what I found out: There are stops, but how many probably depends on the route and the time of day. The stops are announced a few minutes before and usually the driver will tell you how many minutes you got - but the drivers dialect might be hard to understand so if you're unsure then ask the driver or a ...


5

I discovered the wonderful HOTNAT in July when my Eurostar train to Paris was delayed just outside St Pancras, and it was clear I would not then get across Paris in time to catch my booked TGV to Libourne. I found the train manager on the Eurostar to ask his advice, and he immediately wrote out the HOTNAT document for me and stamped both my Eurostar ticket ...


5

In Austria, the costs for travel vaccinations are not covered by the regular health insurance, but must be paid in full by the person requesting them. Source: Austrian Government's Health Portal Not being insured should not prevent you from getting the recommended vaccinations.


4

In short, you risk running into problems at the border when you present the visa or are questioned by the border officer about your itinerary. According to the Schengen visa code: Article 5 The Member State competent for examining and deciding on an application for a uniform visa shall be: (a) the Member State whose territory constitutes the ...


4

We travelled on the Flixbus service from Munich to Zagreb departing at 3.15am recently. There were two drivers onboard and we stopped at a service station in Austria after a couple of hours on the road where we stopped for about 15 minutes and were able to get off and stretch our legs and the drivers swapped over. We then stopped in Ljubljana for 20 minutes ...


4

I'd do the same as you would at home (the USA is not that different than the UK). Get some US money before departing for things like taxi so you do not have to search for an ATM when landing; or need to use the airport exchange agencies. Pay cash for things you are used to pay cash, pay with debit card when you usually pay with it and use credit card like ...


4

To add at least one anecdote about East Asia: I have flown from Paris to Tokyo and back in Sweatpants and had a normal experience. No comments, stares or anything like that. Neither border agents nor flight attendents will look at you funny. They are used to people wearing whatever is most comfortable, especially on a long haul flight such as yours. ...


3

Back in the old days when gate attendants had a lot of leeway in deciding who to upgrade if necessary (economy overbooked, spaces in business) then wearing smarter clothing was one potential point in your favor. These days upgrades are so rigidly prioritized based on Frequent Flyer status, ticket bought etc that it is almost certainly not relevant. But if ...


3

Not sure if the hotel is the cheapest in Europe, but I found one for $4.80 a night called the Old Road Apartments, link. (Not affiliated with the service). Or the cheapest in Belarus classified as a hotel is Райский сад for $4.99.


2

Yes, you will have to re-apply and from Italy (or from Austria) instead of from Germany. While Schengen visa are valid for the whole area in theory, in practice you have to make the travel you applied for. As you applied for a short visit to Germany, your changed plans are really different from the one you applied for. The reason they do not allow this ...


2

Generally, the categorization of Schengen visas is not particularly strict, although you do have to select a "main purpose of the journey" on the application form. The form is given in Annex I of the Schengen Visa Code. In your case, this will be "business," and in your wife's case it will be "tourism." Shall I apply for visa the separately...? You ...


2

You may make minor changes to your itinerary after the application. Usually, moving the date of onward travel between two Schengen countries (or even varying the route) would be minor. You may not misrepresent your itinerary during the visa application, especially if that would change the consulate which handles your application. You should not give the ...


2

On many long-haul flights where sleeping is expected the airlines will provide pajamas to their first-class passengers. Flying used to be special and something that very few people did and, as a result, people often dressed up for their flights. Today, flying is often seen as a chore and just a convenient way of getting from one place to another. We've gone ...


2

I travelled from Europe to New Zealand las April, wich were 2 10+ hour flights, so I had lots of doubts about what to do. So I asked a friend that travels overseas a lot for work and he told me to wear some jeans but pack a sweatpants on my hand luggage, on takeoff wait for the seatbelts signal to switch off and change to the sweatpants and change back to ...


1

The first thing is to check with your bank about the fees. If everything is free If you can make withdrawals in the US without large fees and the currency conversion rate is good then you can use your debit card everywhere and withdraw money whenever you need any. This is my prefered way. If there's a withdrawal fee Like my bank has for non-euro ...


1

There is one important case no one covered in which you need to dress up for a flight. If you're getting extremely discounted tickets because you or a relative works for an airline, then most airlines have a dress code which will apply to you. A recent example of this was the two girls who were denied boarding on a United Airlines flight for wearing ...


1

There are two issues here: 1) Comfort -- the issue which has been addressed by most other answers. I must confess that I often take flights from Europe to China or Australia/NZ -- often with three legs to the flight and spanning two days. It's no great discomfort to travel in a business suit as I often have to go to work immediately on arrival. 2) Border ...


1

It goes without saying that you can, in general, wear whatever your want. It is also clever to dress up comfy for a long-haul flight. And no, your won't get arrested for wearing sweat pants... Cultural perception of sweat pants in public varies a lot throughout Europe. They may be fine in London, have a "lower class" connotation in some places and are ...


1

According to Timatic, the system used by airlines, your residence permit means you can visit without a visa: “The following are exempt from holding a visa: Passengers with a residence permit issued by Sweden for a maximum stay of 90 days” Source: https://www.timaticweb2.com/integration/external.php?ref=d975cfc59f5c0abd06d16e872198110b


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