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28

How long is a piece of a string? Having flown Lufthansa over 20 times this year alone and 100s of times in total here are my experiences. If your carry on is large you risk a weighing more often. If the flight is totally full you risk a weighing more often. If you arrive late at check in you risk a weighing more often. In reality if you are on time and ...


13

Yes. According to Carry-on baggage rules at Lufthansa For a smooth boarding procedure, more stowage space on board and a punctual departure, it is essential that your carry-on baggage corresponds to the regulations. That is why we check your carry-on baggage against the permitted dimensions, quantity and weight at departure airports. And from a ...


9

Occasionally. In my experience, it happens about in 10%-20% of my LH group flights (including Swiss and Austrian). I have a pretty big roll aboard suitcase which probably triggers more attention than a smaller piece of carry on. In all cases, taking out a jacket or moving something heavy to my backpack did the trick, but I always make sure I'm not ...


6

A passport, not necessarily. Your national ID card also work and beyond that, the European Union maintains spreadsheets of recognised travel documents and one of those you are very strongly recommended to keep with you. There are three spreadsheets: Part I: Travel documents issued by third countries and territorial entities xlsx Part II: Travel documents ...


4

If you're a citizen from a country in the Schengen area you need to have your national ID in case you get stopped and your identity needs to be confirmed. If you're not you do need your passport. Most of the time you will not be checked as there are no regular border controls within the Schengen area. If you get checked as a citizen of an EU/Schengen ...


4

The short answer is: yes. The long answer: Switzerland and Austria are both part of the Schengen area, where border controls are generally reduced or non-existent. Nevertheless, while it's very possible that you might cross the border without any official inspection taking place, you should always carry a passport (or equivalent identity document) when ...


4

I've tested just now and the app returned the options. 191 euros is the cheapiest option. So yes you should be able to request an Uber for this trip.


3

Yes, that's the purpose of the Schengen Zone; to encourage inter-European trade and commerce. You need to apply in the EU country that you will be spending the most time in and if it's a tie in terms of days, you need to apply to the first country you will be landing in.


3

Here is some advice out of experience, at least concerning the sleeping part. In Europe, first and foremost, there are two kinds of sleeper accomodation : couchette (berth) and sleeping car. I will not go through the seated car which is best avoided it is for a small 1-hour journey. Couchette is usually 6 beds in a room, or 4 beds like on the above picture....


2

At least in South Germany there are a few famous ones: Technology museum in Sinsheim: Famous for the only place in the world with the two commercial super sonic passenger jets (Concorde, Tupolev TU-144), a huge formula 1 collection and many more tanks, cars and airplanes Technology museum in Speyer (same association behind it as in Sinsheim): Famous for ...


2

Depends a little on what you mean by the "surrounding area", but in Linz, Austria you'll find Ars Electronica Center. I highly recommend checking out the "Panorama" exhibit, but mainly because several of the images used in it are mine.


2

If you can't find a UK->EU adaptor that will take a shaver plug (as in the top answer), you could also use a combination of a standard UK shaver -> UK Type G adapter, then a UK to EU adapter. This is slightly less safe than using one single adapter, but much better than trying to force something into the wrong socket.


2

As long as you travel within the EU (which for now still includes the UK), customs are not involved, the only thing they may check (and that's very very rare) are things that are actually illegal (drugs...) or where there are significant tax differences (cigarettes for instance). They will definitely not care about a laptop, accessories, or a graphics card. ...


1

They might, but you should not worry too much. If it is weighted and goes over the limit and the check-in clerk does not let you "pass this time" you have other options. You can swap items form carry-on luggage to checked-in luggage. You can leave the desk and check-in later with some items in your pockets, etc. The best advice, however, is to check-in ...


1

Yes, your Schengen visa is valid throughout the whole schengen area. You can see the official statement A Schengen visa is a short stay visa allowing its holder to circulate in the Schengen area. The Schengen area covers 26 countries ("Schengen States") without border controls between them. These countries are: Austria, Belgium, the Czech ...


1

The safest way without a doubt is getting an EU charger. Same with laptop chargers -- just swap the IEC C7 AC cable ("figure eight") or IEC C5 ("mickey mouse) for a cable appropriate the local power socket. It doesn't get safer than that. Avoid plug converters whenever you can.


1

You can buy all the SIM cards you want, but can't activate them. You have to be registered in the German residence bureau's data base. No residency, no activation. I went to Greece to get a SIM card.


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