New answers tagged

0

All these considered, I believe that somehow, even though the law states otherwise, I can convince the authorities that I am eligible to obtain a permanent residency by walking them through the reasons which make me practically a person who worked here. Sorry, but you "don't convince the authorities of something even though the law states otherwise&...


1

Under the terms of the EU's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) you have a right to know what information is held about you by any company or organisation that is in the EU. This applies even if you aren't a EU citizen or resident. However, state organisations do have the right to withhold some information for state-security reasons. You can ask the ...


0

I was a foreigner who lived in a EU member state. You are living and working in Netherlands. So, to travel to another EU member state/Schengen country/Switzerland, you need a valid long-term Visa or a residence permit of Netherlands (or any other EU/Schengen country). As far as I know, a work permit is not accepted as a valid entry document for non-EU ...


4

The page you are linking to is at least ambigious and if you check the neighbouring page on temporary restrictions (section 10 - Polish Borders), they kind of contradict themselves. Internal EU borders were opened completely on June 13th. Since then, all travel, also for tourism or fun, from all other EU/EEA countries has been allowed without restrictions. ...


5

A person with a work permit is not a citizen (to make it simple, a citizen is someone who can get a passport from that country). A person with a work permit way be a resident of that country, though. But the site you linked has a long list which goes well beyond just citizens, and includes: people who have the right of permanent or temporary residence in ...


1

There is currently no electronic record of the refusal shared between Schengen countries but such a system, the Entry/Exit System is currently being implemented. There is probably already some national record of it. There should be a stamp in your passport that could alert border guards. Legally, it is not in and of itself a reason to refuse entry again but ...


Top 50 recent answers are included