74

Denmark has never issued ID cards of the kind that some other EU member states do. This is why a passport is the only option for Danes traveling within the EU. If Denmark chose to start issuing such ID cards, they would be valid for travel to other EU member states too. What is new(ish) is that citizens used to be able to travel between the Nordic ...


12

According to Moldova Border Police website: Foreign citizens and stateless persons arriving in Moldova are recorded when crossing the state border and their identification data is introduced in the Population State Register. So they will have the information in their system when you entered the country, and thus the officers have a way to check ...


10

Is this a general policy of Aer Lingus not to accept European travellers with ID cards into Ireland? Aer Lingus policy for travel within the EU is: (There are slightly different provisions for "To and from Britain" but these appear to cover only between UK and Ireland for those born in Ireland or the U.K. and also a citizen of either country.) Timatic /...


10

Relax, you'll be fine. Timatic, the database used by airlines checking passenger, states: Passports and other documents accepted for entry issued to residents of the United Kingdom must be valid on arrival. For obvious reasons, this is the practice in most countries. Since the UK Home Office has you in their database, at the border they'll know you are ...


9

Your passport card remains fully valid across the EU/EFTA (and most other European countries for that matter). Your Danish friends say otherwise because Denmark has never even had a national ID card, and so they cannot relate to this.


9

If your baby is a Belgian citizen with a Belgian ID card, then he can travel to Greece using it. Otherwise, he officially needs a passport and residence permit, but unless flying on a budget carrier, you probably won't be asked for ID at all unless you check in luggage.


7

If he held a national ID card, the check-in agent was simply wrong, and he should immediately request compensation from Aer Lingus, as well as from Aviator, the handling agent responsible for Aer Lingus at Arlanda (in other words, the person denying him boarding was an Aviator employee) Aviator can be contacted at operations.arn@aviator.eu Swedish ID cards ...


5

As someone who is not a citizen of the EU, a national of an eea country, or a citizen of Switzerland, you need at least a passport to enter the UK (although if you are a refugee or stateless person, this could also be a passport-like document issued to you by your country of refuge). If you are a national of a visa-exempt country, you do not need any ...


4

You can visit the following countries using just a Swedish National ID Card: Europe Nordics Denmark (incl. Faroe Islands & Greenland) Finland Iceland Norway (incl. Svalbard) Schengen (excl. Nordics) Austria Belgium Czech Republic Estonia France (incl. overseas territories & Monaco) Germany Greece Hungary Italy (incl. San Marino & Vatican ...


4

According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_policy_of_Bosnia_and_Herzegovina EU citizens can enter using a national ID card (incl. Irish passport card) for a stay of up to 90 days within 180 days Also Citizens of the Kingdom of Sweden are exempted from the visa requirement when entering, exiting or travelling through Bosnia and Herzegovina to 90 ...


4

This is applicable to the EU: Passports for British citizens are valid for travel to any EU country up to and including the passport expiry date. (Source) You can travel on the expiry date depending on the country, some require a certain amount of validity on the passport. In the EU there is no such requirement: All 28 countries in the European Union ...


4

Romanians can't enter Ukraine with an ID card; only Ukrainian and Turkish citizens can. So you have to go to Poland through Hungary and Slovakia. EDIT: as a dual Romanian-Ukrainian citizen, you can use your Romanian ID to enter the Schengen Area (in your case through Poland)


4

Yes, it is possible to enter Albania with only a Greek ID, however you need to be sure that it is the new Greek ID which is with Latin letter. Still a few older ones ID's are existing with only greek letters. With these you won't be allowed to enter in case of a border control.


4

I've never been asked anything by them, and I'm Swedish (i.e. also EU). If using an ID card, you'll get a migration card with an entry stamp if and only if entering by land from Turkey (at least at the main crossing in Sarpi). If entering by air or sea, you will not get one. However, the ID will be scanned and it will be put on record when you entered and (...


1

EU citizens have been allowed into Albania with their national IDs since summer 2006 As stated by the Albanian MFA (page 1): GRQIA: PASAPORTË & LETËRNJOFTIM meaning: GREECE: PASSPORT OR ID CARD However, in countries outside the EU/EFTA, such as Albania, only the new, bilingual card is a valid travel document.


1

Yes. EU countries are required to grant admission, along with a right of residence for up to three months, to citizens of other EU countries who have a national ID card. This right may be abridged only in exceptional cases, the most likely being if your friend is found to be a threat to public safety. There is an additional right of residence of more than ...


1

Being that someone I know entered Turkey on their passport and exited on their ID card hassle-free (claiming to have lost the entry form, and getting a new one with only an exit stamp) you should be fine. Turkey, unlike most EU countries, records entries and exits electronically. If you want it confirmed, though, you can always go to the airport and ask to ...


1

I have traveled with SAS from Arlanda to Dublin. I went through smoothly with my Swedish national ID card (checking in and border control). But at the boarding gate, the SAS staff asked me for my passport. I asked for the reason and she replied that Ireland does not accept National ID. Fortunately I did have my passport with me. I haven’t tried to use my ...


1

The following is without guarantee and the airline may still deny you boarding if it thinks a passport should be held. If the airport in Istanbul is Ataturk airport (IST) you should not need to clear Turkish immigration - thus you should be OK with your national ID only. The website of the airport does not give any information for international to ...


1

All countries accept Greek ID cards, so you'll be perfectly fine. Slovenia and Croatia are EU countries, and so have to accept it. Bosnia has accepted EU ID cards since September 2002, and Montenegro since June 2004


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