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Answer Can I get financial compensation? Can you first quantify in euros how much damage you suffered from detention? If yes, consult a lawyer asking if there is any rule granting you compensation. If no, you can't demand anything. Quantification can be done by any means, like missed connection and suffered costs. Despite any formula, you need a ...


64

I'd say the chance to get any kind of financial compensation is low. There is no compensation provision in Schengen Borders Code, and I doubt there is one in the Italian national law. You can pursue the court case against them, but note that even Article 8 gives the border officials leeway: However, on a non-systematic basis, when carrying out minimum ...


32

I think you are out of luck because in my understanding, the officer was right and you were wrong. Well, the officer is always right to begin with, but in this case, he really is. You correctly state that as an EU citizen you have the right to move freely within the territory of the Member States and need nothing but an ID card. Ukraine is not a member ...


14

The US State Department says: Visa Waiver Program Improvement and Terrorist Travel Prevention Act of 2015 Under the Visa Waiver Program Improvement and Terrorist Travel Prevention Act of 2015, travelers in the following categories must obtain a visa prior to traveling to the United States as they are no longer eligible to travel under the Visa Waiver ...


10

Yes, this is allowed for EU passport holders depending on how long you spend outside of Brazil in between visits, and how long your visits last. Exception: this regulation does not apply to citizens of Croatia, Portugal, Poland, United Kingdom and Ireland. As seen on their website Brazil allows: The 90-day period begins on the date of first entry and ...


9

According to the UK Border Force: You no longer have to fill in a landing card. Your passport (and visa if you have one) will be checked at border control. You’ll usually be asked why you’re coming to the UK. Therefore the question is pretty much moot, as no one will have to fill out landing cards anymore as of 2019, regardless of what happens during the ...


8

According to https://www.udi.no/en/word-definitions/registration-certificate-for-eueea-nationals/ you need to register with the police as an EEA national living in Norway for more than three months. It says explicitly that you need to register only once, so presumably it will not be a problem that you move around within norway after having registered. (The ...


7

I don't think you have any chance here. Generalizing your problem: The basic premise, opposite of what happens now would be that, if you were delayed in a security queue by the officer you would get a compensation for that. The practical result of such rule would be that the border police would be pressured to avoid any delays to cut down any costs. And, ...


7

I'm afraid that this falls into the category of "we don't know at the present." If free movement persists under the Immigration (EEA) Regulations 2016 or successor legislation, the landing cards will not be required. But the timing of the repeal of that legislation appears uncertain in the event of a no-deal departure. If there is a deal, the timing will ...


6

You need to re-apply. If you obtain a new passport or change your name, gender or country of citizenship, you will be required to apply for a new travel authorization. This is also required if one of your answers to any of the VWP eligibility questions changes. The associated fee of $14 will be charged for each new application. Source: CBP


6

You do not need to do anything. Your US citizen friend can enter the Schengen area for up to 90 days without a visa. If the border officer asks your friend what their plans are, then "visiting a friend in Sweden" would be an entirely normal answer and should not pose a problem. There is always a small possibility that your friend might be denied entry to ...


6

Technically you should not be admitted on the VWP if you have a valid B visa. And there's no reason why you should want to be: you could just as well spend six months in the USA on a B visa, then briefly leave to the US or Canada, and then be readmitted for six months on your B visa. In fact, you can ask for up to one year at your initial admission. I ...


6

This answer assumes that "(European)" means that your new country of citizenship is a member of the EU or the Schengen area. In that case, if you are entering the UK while the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2016 are in force, the ban has no effect, because the ban is effective only under the Immigration Rules, of which the Regulations are ...


5

I have to say, as far as I know, this is probably in the category: Inconceivable you would try this :-o Researchable fact - people are arrested at airports all the time. It's a favorite hangout of the blokes with guns who arrest people who are enemies of the state for various reasons big and small. https://www.dailystar.co.uk/news/latest-news/709439/...


5

In principle, you have a right to live in Ireland, as an EU citizen. Your right to enter Ireland is strongly protected by law. However, you are correct in thinking that the UK and Ireland share information about deportations and visas. It is possible that when you enter Ireland, the border officer could become aware of your previous issue in the UK. Legally ...


5

Once they are convinced that you are an EU citizen, they have to let you in unless a few very special cases apply (you would have to be on a list of people who pose a threat against public safety, health, and order). Before they are convinced that you are an EU citizen, they can ask all sorts of questions and gauge your reaction. They have to form a ...


5

If your permesso di soggiorno says "Carta di soggiorno per familiari di cittadino dell'Unione" or anything like that then you can go without a visa. If it does not say that, then you will need an EEA family permit.


5

Can I leave for a period of time (let's say one month) and then have the right to re-enter and stay another month (or three months if needed)? Basically, the answer is yes. As you may be aware, this is controlled by Directive 2004/38/EC There's not a whole lot of clarity about this because it's simply not enforced very regularly. In fact, an EU citizen ...


4

According to https://www.gov.uk/guidance/visiting-the-uk-after-brexit What you'll need to do to visit the UK after the UK leaves the EU, including whether you'll need to apply for a visa. If the UK leaves the EU with a deal If the UK leaves the EU with a deal, what you’ll need to enter the UK will not change until 2021. If the UK leaves the ...


3

My Question: Is it likely that an EU-citizen will be able to clear Schengen immigration and change piers in under 40 minutes? Yes, probably better than 95%, but if you really do need to be at the destination that evening, you probably should add more padding. I've done the minimum forty minute connection from non-Schengen to Schengen a few times (probably ...


3

Yes, it seems that some (at least one) company makes an exception. Disclaimer: I am not affiliated with Autohopper, it's just the one that's around the corner from where I live. From https://www.autohopper.nl/veelgestelde-vragen Mag ik bij jullie een auto huren als ik nog geen 21 ben of nog geen jaar mijn rijbewijs heb? Ja, dat kan. Een geldig ...


3

Yes, this is fine. An EU ID card is valid for entry into any EU member state - Wikipedia specifically states that the Cartao de Cidadao is a "valid travel document within all of Europe". The only disadvantage of using an ID card is that you may not be able to use the e-Passport gates, so you may have to wait longer at passport control (this is definitely ...


3

I have come to the conclusion that the answer to this question is not "settled law" (as we would say in the US, at least). As I read it, the directive and the Schengen codes taken together clearly say that the 90/180 rule does not apply to a non-EU family member traveling with an EU family member, but some seem to think that Directive 2004/38/EC applies ...


3

Note this answer has been heavily edited in the light of the OP's clarifications; some of the comments below will read better in the context of the earlier versions of this answer, which can be seen in the edit history. I originally filleted the KPMG advice and the EC regulations to which it refers, but here's the rub: it doesn't actually matter whether ...


2

As noted in a comment, you don't have to provide any evidence of your intention to leave if you apply for a visa under EU freedom of movement. However, to qualify, you must be traveling with your father, or traveling to join your father. under 21, or dependent on your father or his spouse. Your application should therefore include proof that your father ...


2

Yes, it is still the case. They would complain about you not having a return ticket out of the Colombia. Workaround: Book "fake" ticket VivaAir airlines offers a possibility to Lock the fare for the price of 10 Euro. Just start booking as you normally book the flight from Colombia to any other country. During the process of choosing the add-ons, select ...


2

When arriving in Geneva on an international flight, you are not able to exit directly to France, but will have to go through Switzerland. Exiting directly to France without going through Switzerland is only possible if you arrive on a flight from a French airport. From the airport's web page: Is it possible to exit directly from the French side when ...


2

According to the UK government website, only those with a UK biometric visa get their fingerprints checked at the border. Accordingly, it should be expected that only EU citizens who have a UK biometric visa will have their fingerprints checked at the border.


2

Having either passport with you is sufficient both ways, I have done that. No passport lead to problems as the airline personnel didn't even care to look in Timatic or discuss with me, they said 'passport or bye'. [even the German employee of the German airline Lufthansa, who certainly knows how a German ID looks, didn't accept it] Landing in Europe, local ...


2

Yes, you can use an EEA family permit for a short trip. My best evidence in support of this assertion is that my mother-in-law has done it. In the free movement directive, there is a "right of residence for up to three months" which does not require anyone to be a "qualified person" (i.e., working, studying, or having demonstrated self-sufficience): this ...


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