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Answer Can I get financial compensation? Can you first quantify in euros how much damage you suffered from detention? If yes, consult a lawyer asking if there is any rule granting you compensation. If no, you can't demand anything. Quantification can be done by any means, like missed connection and suffered costs. Despite any formula, you need a ...


80

The answer is almost certainly #1: it's extraordinarily unlikely that existing British passports would be completely invalidated by Brexit. A British passport states that you're a British citizen, which will continue to be the case even if Britain leaves the EU. While I can't point to any official sources, I can note that a) passports of European countries ...


64

I'd say the chance to get any kind of financial compensation is low. There is no compensation provision in Schengen Borders Code, and I doubt there is one in the Italian national law. You can pursue the court case against them, but note that even Article 8 gives the border officials leeway: However, on a non-systematic basis, when carrying out minimum ...


46

My experience at the UK border is the same and I even have had a short questioning when leaving my own country. Something I am definitely allowed to do. At some point this was at a smaller airport where you have to go trough the border control to reach a few extra-Schengen gates. The border guard asked where I was flying. I considered this to be a silly ...


45

A US/Swedish dual national transited UK immigration controls on his US passport. After a brief landing interview, the IO issued Indefinite Leave to Remain along with a handwritten note that the holder was a dual national. This was a mistake on the IO's part. Sometimes this happens; I have seen it personally about twice, once in London and once in Moscow ...


40

You have a bigger problem than "will Ryanair let me fly" but rather "will I be admitted to the UK". To be admitted to the UK, you must usually have a passport, or an EEA national identity card. You don't have either, which makes admission difficult. You would only be admitted if you can convince the Border Officer of your EU citizenship. If you aren't ...


32

I think you are out of luck because in my understanding, the officer was right and you were wrong. Well, the officer is always right to begin with, but in this case, he really is. You correctly state that as an EU citizen you have the right to move freely within the territory of the Member States and need nothing but an ID card. Ukraine is not a member ...


30

It sounds like the IO went above and beyond, with better service than the traveler could rationally have expected in advance -- but I can't see anything wrong about the outcome. The EU/EEA freedom of movement rights apply to a person, not to a particular passport. Once the IO was convinced that the traveler was indeed an EU citizen, it may not have been ...


28

The visa waiver program allows you to enter the US for up to 90 days per visit. There is no rule about 180 days. Immigration officers may question whether you are abusing the program by using it to spend too much time in the US, but that seems extremely unlikely in your case. You do not need an alternative, but you can always apply for a visa. Your visa ...


28

In your comment, you linked to an official source that (rather understatedly) answers your question: To save the taxpayer money, the newly designed passports will be introduced in a phased approach. After the UK leaves the EU, burgundy passports will continue to be issued but with no reference to the European Union. New blue and gold passports ...


27

The fact that you're newlywed is irrelevant. What is important is that you are one family travelling together. I've been in exact this situation before. I am an American citizen and my wife is not. Whenever we fly to the USA, we'd go through the immigration together - through the lanes for "Non-US passports". We give two passports together - mine and ...


25

The other answers have given good general reasons. I want to add a little bit to your particular case, though. In OP you mention that you asked the border officer to stamp a piece of paper that you had brought for him. You further clarified in a comment: A blank A4 sheet torn in half which I sometimes bring as a souvenir stamp sheet. When approaching ...


25

The officer might have wondered if your documents are genuine or a (good) forgery. That can sometimes be gauged by asking a couple of rambling questions and see if the answers are coherent. That starts with "what is your birthdate" even if they have the passport directly in front of their eyes and goes from there. In that sense yes, he questioned your ...


23

Border Officers are trained to look for anything suspicious, and rightly so. Their job is not to welcome you to the country, but to protect the border. Just because your nationality grants legal right of entry there could be other circumstances that affect your entry; you may be smuggling, your docs may be forged, you may have other nefarious intentions. ...


23

Note: this question was later cross-posted in Expats with the result of further information being available. Those interested should visit the cross-posted question at UK immigration application: Evidence / Proof that I lived there (EU citizen, no passport stamps) Just curious if they keep track of me entering / exiting the UK and whether that's saved ...


23

You stated you were arriving from Zurich. The officer asked you a destabilizing question: why do you have a Swiss debit card? Such questions are meant to gauge your reaction and the consistency of your story. A legitimate holder would react, naturally, just as you did: "uh, because I said I live/study in Zurich, Switzerland." A non-legitimate holder (one ...


22

Cell provider employee here... I'm not gonna recommend our services, so I guess that makes this not a disclaimer? Also, edited as a result of noticing your link to your phone radios... Your best bet for having coverage in the middle of nowhere in the United States is Verizon Wireless. Unfortunately, they are a CDMA provider, so if you wanted to go with them,...


21

Yes, a visa is required for EU citizens. Fortunately, getting one is free and (usually) pretty quick. The easiest way is to apply for eVisitor online. See "Eligible passport holders" on that page to check if you are eligible for eVisitor. The eVisitor allows visitors to travel to Australia for short term business or tourism purposes for up to three ...


19

If you only had your Brazilian passport, it would bring up some subtle questions about obligations when crossing the border, your rights as EU citizen, what you may or may not do with an expired passport, what the consequences might be in practice, etc. but in that case you don't have to worry about all that. A national ID card is enough, plain and simple. ...


19

As others stated, you won't make it without an Id, so your best bet is to request a new ID. A Portuguese ID can be requested with very high urgency. You can do it today and still get it today or Friday (depending on your flight schedule it might work), plus it's close enough from the airport to just go there directly after (assuming you're in Lisbon). https:...


18

Aas long as you leave a country with the same passport that you entered in on, then you're ok. So: Option 1: Entering Aus on Aus passport, leaving on Greek = bad Option 2: Entering on Greek, leaving on Aus = bad Option 3: Entering and leaving on Greek passport = good Option 4: Entering and leaving on Aus passport = good The reason being for counts and ...


18

You are eligible for comensation under the European Union's EU261 compensation rules. Your flight would classify as a "type 2" flight, which for a cancellation occurring less than 1 week before departure, resulting in an arrival delay of more than 3 hours, would be due €400 compensation, paid in cash (ie, not vouchers/discounts/etc). You should contact the ...


17

Turned comment into answer per @Gayot Fow suggestion You can consider yourself extremely lucky, if the was the weirdest question you ever got at immigration. Immigration officers are supposed to ask some off beat questions to gauge your reaction. See http://www.statewatch.org/news/2007/jan/uk-ho-immig-decision-making-study.pdf


16

There will be absolutely no change for you. No change in visa requirements. No change in anything. Firstly, post-referendum the UK government need to work out terms of the exit. Based on prior examples, this could take forever! Then, Article 50 gives a timeline at 2 years from notifying the EU of exit terms. The Treaties shall cease to apply to the ...


16

I can only answer to you how the situation in Switzerland and the Netherlands is. You are able to aquire an emergency passport at the airport, when you lose your ID or passport or when it has been stolen. Be sure to arrive a couple of hours earlier than normally, because you probably won't be the only one having that issue. Take the following things with ...


14

It depends on your citizenship. Generally, the official homepage states: Foreign nationals require a valid and accepted travel document to enter Switzerland. In addition, a visa is required in certain cases. Furthermore, sufficient funds must be available or procurable by legal means to cover the cost of living during the transit through or the ...


14

As a retired Immigration Officer, there is a madness to questioning people. Most people do not realize that you were being watched well before you enter the inspection station area. You may notice that most officers have a ear piece or radio. You are being observed and whoever is traveling with you as well. The officer is going to ask redundant questions. ...


14

The US State Department says: Visa Waiver Program Improvement and Terrorist Travel Prevention Act of 2015 Under the Visa Waiver Program Improvement and Terrorist Travel Prevention Act of 2015, travelers in the following categories must obtain a visa prior to traveling to the United States as they are no longer eligible to travel under the Visa Waiver ...


13

Assuming you are an EU citizen, you are indeed allowed to exit the airport and be able to return without problems, as long as you have a valid boarding pass for your next flight. In fact, the Schiphol website suggests that you leave the airport and stroll around the city if you have more than four hours before your next flight. The recommended check-in time ...


13

Definitely you should use your Australian passport in Australia and Greek passport in Greece (because for these countries you are their citizen and they don't really care if you have a dual nationality). And as others have said it's safest to use the same passport to enter and exit the country. However, in many countries the police would not check your ...


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