Hot answers tagged

18

It highly depends on how much you are used to the temperature and humidity, and how you will get around. If you are most of the time in a airconditioned truck, no problem. If you walk around outside, it will be the same as if someone takes a water spray and sprays it over your face, every 10-15 minutes or so, depending on your fitness level. If you are ...


10

I don't know if you can get cheaper insurance in Ecuador, but there are many potential problems with this plan. It's very unlikely that travel insurance in Ecuador will pay to fly you back to the USA in the event of you becoming seriously ill, or fly your body back to the USA if you die. Either of those things would be extremely expensive. As I recall, the ...


8

First off it is a highland food. People on the coast will basically say they don't eat rat (I know it is not a rat). I find it easier to get in the smaller highland cities as opposed to say Quito or Cuenca but you can get it in both. By far the best experience I have had is eating it is in Banos with the locals on a weekend evening just after dark. Each ...


6

Think about it as least wet rather than driest. That would be January to February then but do expect rain at least every other day. Because the ground and roads are mostly dirt, paths can get extremely muddy and due to the shade provided by tropical trees, they remain that way long after it has rained. Keep in mind that climate varies from year to year and ...


6

Immigration rules are about you as a person. Changing your name does not make you a different person. Different countries might be good or bad at identifying people who change their names and travel on new passports as being people who have visited before. However, we don't give advice about how to break the law or how likely you are to get caught if you do ...


5

You might want to look at long-term travel insurance policies. The upside is that you might be able to find plans which have no specific residence requirement, are probably cheaper than US-based insurance, might be easier to deal with than local insurance, and could even be bought after the travel has started. Unlike run-of-the-mill travel insurance, these ...


5

I would say she's worrying for nothing in regard to the efficiency of the US embassy, it's staffed by Americans not Ecuadorian(I like your DMV analogy). She should enter Ecuador as planned with her Ecuadorian passport and apply for her new US passport at the Embassy in Ecuador. According to the embassy's website, passports take 10-15 days to be issued. ...


5

One option would be to transit in Amsterdam. KLM has routes to both Equador and India, and the Netherlands does not require airport transit visas of Indian nationals who stay within the non-Schengen transit zone of the airport. None of the other destinations Wikipedia lists from Quito sound like they're likely to have direct flights to India and allow ...


5

I was in a first place trying a way to hitchike there. Now i know its regulated i contacted friends working on boatd they told me to join a crew on crewbay.com or arc.com or findacrew.com and You work on a boat for a week. But it gets u there 😊 enjoy and ses u there maybe


5

The road is actually very good. The problem is Andes. It's full of mountains and curves so everyone has to drive slowly. The bus takes 10 to 12 hours but if you go in your own car it might be less time.


5

Yes, it is as safe as before. There is a lot of rubble in some coastal towns but the rest of the country is intact. Most major city for tourism, the entire Andes, Galapagos, Amazon and cloud-forests are just as they were before the earthquake.


5

Besides more global solutions like http://www.onesimcard.com, there are no 'local' sim cards for multiple South American countries, comparable to Africa's Airtel. On top of that, South American cellphone networks tend to be somewhat fractured, meaning that out-of-the-way locations might only be served by one, or a few, of the nation's networks. So, with a ...


5

Update and thanks: They moved the passport office to another building but she managed to get there at 10AM. Had the passport in hand at 2PM. Changed flight for $300 fee for Saturday. No problems. THANK YOU ALL


4

All that is changed, TOTALLY. Both governments have change their offices, outside of town, in the middle of nowhere, super simple, super safe. All in one building, exit from Ecuador / entry to Peru, in all one room. 24h attendance, 3 security guards, and cleaning persons. There is a board with the different destinations and related costs, from this point on, ...


4

Based on my experience of Ecuadorian electrics, I would assume that even grounded sockets might not be grounded. On that basis, you might as well take an ungrounded adaptor. If you're going off the beaten track, it may also be worth taking a couple of light switches, a small screwdriver, and some rubber gloves. Since you want to travel light, your best ...


3

According to a thread on tripadvisor: To enter my country you need to show the registration which prooves the vehicle is yours. After that the Customs will give you a "perniso de internacion" for 3 months. You can leave your vehicle at your hotel, and then you can return and continue with more journeys down to Peru or Colombia in it. You have ...


3

As long as you have an onward ticket from Lima, you don't need a visa for transit <24 hours:  Peru (PE)  TWOV (Transit Without Visa): Visa required, except for Holders of confirmed onward tickets for a max. transit For details, click here time of 24 hours.There is no hotel accommodation available at Lima Airport. According to Timatic (The ...


3

EDIT: Europe is more flexible than what I understood when I wrote this, as long as you are transiting airside only. However, I stand by my disclaimer that airlines are likely to cause problems (unjustifiably) if you have no visa for your transit country and also no visa for your final destination. Well, it seems transit visas are required for the US and ...


3

According to https://www.passportindex.org/comparebyPassport.php, an e-Visa is required. This is confirmed by Timatic, which says: Visa required E-visas can be obtained before departure at https://www.consuladovirtual.gob.ec/web/guest/inicio Passengers must have a printed e-visa confirmation which can be verified at https://evisaecuador.cancilleria.gob.ec:...


2

Even better, it is the Pan-American Highway so it is the road and historically the best maintained in Ecuador. It is about an 8-9 hour drive, limited stops by private car. I did it at night once and it was stressful. Ill do it of days from now on. I would take the executive (Taxi bus on the sign) bus from Quitumbe as it leaves very regularly and enjoy the ...


2

I live in Bolivia. Yes there is always a risk when it comes to carrying around expensive camera equipment. There are risks in other countries as in the United States etc etc. Some good ideas are: Consider buying an older, used DSLR and leaving your nice one at home. Use a camera bag that doesn't scream "photographer." Be careful where you leave your ...


2

You've essentially asked where is it dry except where it's dry? Galapagos and coastal provinces are usually dry around this time of the year. The rest of the country expects moderately rainy weather in March which means a higher probability of rain. You may be lucky some days, while others not. Jungle trips are possible and you should expect rain there any ...


2

First of all, the location description is very vague. You can cross the boarder from Colombia into Ecuador by foot. Those are neighboring countries. I assume therefore that you want to start from a larger city, like Cartagena and go to Guayaquil. However, from Cartagena, you are in for more than 2000km. Panama, on the other hand is still 1500km away. Which ...


2

I just called Copa Airlines, my carrier. They said that I don't need this vaccine. So the general answer to this question seems to be "Call your airline" Edit: One month later, this was indeed the case. Went USA-> Panama -> Ecuador -> Panama -> USA with no problem.


2

Post-travel answer for posterity: the bus terminal, including ticket offices, but excluding catering, is open and guarded at all times. The safest place seems to be the platform where the buses stop because only people with tickets can access it.


2

As per the below reference, no it is not a visa free nor on arrival. https://www.passportindex.org/comparebyPassport.php?p1=ng&fl=&s=yes


2

Cheapest way is Lima to Piura overnight bus (16hrs). Piura to Loja bus (8 & half hrs) & Loja to Quito overnight bus (12 hrs). We wanted cheapest & needed to go quick so this is how we done it. We didn't stop off anywhere. We found the border pretty straight forward actually & total cost was about $30.


2

It does not appear that there are any direct buses, though it probably wouldn't hurt to pop in to the bus terminal in Popayán and ask. Failing that, the most straightforward route is to take a bus (7–8 hours) from Popayán to the border town of Ipiales, from which you can take a minibus or taxi to Tulcán, Ecuador, and from there a bus (about 4 hours) to Quito....


2

This is quite a bump to an old thread, but it may serve someone. There are buses leaving from Cali (they have to pass trhough Popayan, but I don't think they stop there) to Quito and Lima. The company name is Ormeño. From Popayan to Cali is a relatively short ride (2 hours in a bus), and you can contact Ormeño at Cali's Terminal de Transportes. The contact ...


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