57

Get a lawyer, get a lawyer NOW - you should indeed be worried about your son's next entry to the UK, not just the renewal in 2021 (which stands a high chance of being refused). You are going to need a lawyer experienced in both UK and Canadian immigration issues to sort this one out, this is far beyond what we deal with here. To sum up from the comments some ...


28

Typically, yes. The airline doesn't really care what nationality you are or which passport you use, all they need to know is that you will be accepted at the destination country, and they'll accept whatever documentation you have for this. The one major caveat to this is countries that insist on passenger info being registered well in advance, notably the US....


23

Citizenship of the Philippines is acquired by jus sanguinis ("by blood"), so the fact that your mother is Filipino automatically gives you citizenship of the Philippines (given your date of birth — rules have changed over time). Citizenship of Japan is also acquired by jus sanguinis, though with a few additional conditions for people born abroad, ...


11

I don't think this is normally an issue. For the most part, you will only be showing one passport. For example, use your European passport in the EU (when leaving or arriving) and use your foreign passport when you enter that country. In third countries, use the passport that shows eligibility to your destination for that part of the journey. The only time I ...


9

No. You, as the national of a visa-exempt country, may visit the Schengen Area for up to 90 days per 180-day period. Whether you hold more the one passport from the same country (it is legal in some situations) or hold passports from more than one country is irrelevant. You would still be the same person.


9

Your question seems to depend on the common assumption that airline bookings are bound to a specific passport. That assumption is entirely incorrect. One man even took a woman on a round-the-world trip simply because she had the same name as his ex-girlfriend. I routinely use different passports for different flights on the same booking (a US passport and ...


6

It is unlawful to depart the US without a valid US passport, but this is almost never enforced, and there is no penalty. I have never tried leaving without my US passport, but I usually don't show it to anyone when I leave, and I've never been prevented from leaving the US or asked to show my US passport or to prove my immigration status. However, I ...


6

This question appears to be about Customs and Border Protection immigration inspectors rather than Border Patrol officers. (Border Patrol is a distinct agency, although it is subordinate to CBP in the government's organizational chart.) Are US citizens obligated to disclose foreign citizenships to US border patrol upon entry? No. I know that US border ...


6

I guess you said it in your question -- people traveling on their US passports would need the ETIAS authorization beforehand to enter Europe. Traveling on their EU passport would presumably save that step (along with any associated fees).


4

US law allows this. It requires you to have a valid US passport when you leave the US, not to use it (the actual word used in the statute is "bear"). I do it all the time (with a Dutch passport). There are two possible problems, neither of which I have ever faced. The first is that the airline might insist on seeing your US passport, or they ...


4

You don’t really need a passport for a booking, and even if you add one, it doesn’t matter. There can be significant time between booking and flying and documents and requirements can change. You need to present a passport at check in that needs to be valid for your current travel. Which one you present is up to you and United doesn’t care as long as it’s ...


3

Yes, you can most definitely do that (have done that too many times to count). The information you provide to the airline is mostly for the destination country, not the one you are leaving, and since the US do not do any exit checks, there's no-one else to show your US passport. At some point in time check-in personnel would ask questions when you left the ...


3

The two are totally unrelated. There is no requirement for French citizens to hold a French license in either France or Spain. For example, a license that a French citizen obtained while residing in another EU country is fully valid in both countries, even if you were to take up residence. I am not familiar with the requirements for your Mexican license to ...


3

Your newborn is a US citizen, and 18 USC §1185 requires US citizens to bear a valid US passport for entry into (and exit from) the US. Airlines know this, and will refuse to board her onto a flight to the US unless she has a valid US passport. That she is a dual citizen of the US and another country is irrelevant. As a US citizen, the airline will apply the ...


3

As long as China will issue a visa on his Chilean passport (and they might have questions about his status in the US and why he's not using his US passport if he is applying at a Chinese consulate in the US), he should have no problem traveling leaving the US and entering China, as well as exiting China, on his Chilean passport (once China's COVID-19 entry ...


2

The US has two conflicting rules A US citizen must use their US to enter the country A US citizen cannot be denied entry into the US (passport or not). In practice #2 trumps #1, so if you manage to get to the border and can prove that you are a US citizen, you will be admitted. They may hassle your for a while, but they will let you in. The tricky part ...


2

Since your question is, “So how could I check if I still have citizenship?“. My answer is call the embassy. Who ever said that you have to go into the embassy itself. My South African wife has never set foot in the South African Embassy in Washington D.C.. It is very unlikely that she has ever set foot in the South African Consulate or the Honorary Consul of ...


2

I almost always check in for flights leaving the US with my non-US passport. I show that passport to everyone, including the TSA (who are only identifying you, not investigating your immigration status). It's never been a problem. I have the sense that some US airlines may pay attention to the immigration status of departing foreigners, but I usually use ...


2

You always check in with the passport that you will use to enter the destination country Always enter and leave a country with the same passport If you switch passports during travel, let the airline know, especially if the country has exit controls. Example "I'm leaving Germany on passport A and will enter Korea on passport B". The US doesn't ...


2

Flights are not booked with a passport - but on a name. They cannot be used by someone else (= having a different name). On your outbound leg, you will need to use either the passport that has the matching name, or the US passport together with documentation of the name change. The gate agent will probably also ask you about your return leg, as they are ...


1

can anyone please tell me or confirm that exiting the US without my US passport won't be an issue? It's not an issue. US has no exit controls. You can enter a third country with any passport you like. I know I need my US passport for reentering the US, Since it's so hard to renew passports, there is a Covid exemption in place: https://www.state.gov/return-...


1

The US doesn't have exit controls, so you won't have a problem usually. The regulation doesn't have a penalty to be enforced anyway. You don't need to be worried about the US here, but whether the airline will let you board or not, which depends on if you'll be able to enter your destination. I assume that on an Irish passport, you'll be able to enter visa-...


1

General answer: Admission into country C is governed by the laws of country C. A and B's opinion don't really matter. If it's legal to enter country C with passport B, than they will admit you. The fact that you also have passport of country A and a visa in that passport, doesn't matter. If you present passport B at the border, they will only look at ...


1

Short answer: He will have no problems leaving the country. Your son cannot be denied entry into the US. He may get questioned or yelled at by CBP but he will get in, if he manages to get to the border in the first place However, no airline will let him board a US bound flight with an expired US passport As a dual citizen you are required to use your US ...


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