163

This is not only completely legal, it's how all hotels work. They have a published check-out time, which will vary between hotels but is usually somewhere between 10am and 1pm. if you wish to stay longer, you need to request either a late checkout (which may be free, or may be charged, depending on a number of factors), or pay for an extra night. In my ...


53

There are many different "fare classes" of economy fare. Some cost more, and all you are paying for is "this is a class you might be able to upgrade from." The cost of the ticket plus the cost of the upgrade is less than the cost of a business class ticket, but you can't always upgrade because there may not be space available in business. There's a luck ...


47

As proof your friend could sure use his friends/companions/colleagues eyewitness accounts of his denied boarding, plus his printed boarding pass and transportation tickets to the airport, even though as @chx points out, this may not be convincing them enough. Also worth enquiring with the airport if they have any records that they are able to share in a ...


45

This is perfectly normal. Checkout times at hotels are usually between 10:00 and 12:00 and you need to pay something extra (sometimes for the next night, sometimes less - depending on hotel rules) for overstaying. Most hotels offer their guests to leave their luggage for free for the rest of the day. So in this case I would check-out of the hotel in the ...


43

You are shouting (unnecessarily) and blaming Emirates for what is your fault. Emirates provide lots of very helpful visa advice, such as: Please double-check foreign entry requirements for travellers from your country of nationality from their website, and their Terms and Conditions (in this respect effectively identical to all other passenger ...


41

As airline horror stories go, this one is pretty mild. You arrived at your destination city only a few hours late, with luggage. Moreover (and this is the important point) the reason for all this delay was completely outside the airline's control. They don't control the passport line, or the computer systems. They don't owe you anything, any more than if ...


40

Well, it just doesn't work like that. No, they will not re-sell your ticket because even though you cancelled part of your itinerary, your ticket likely still has value. They are two different things and your ticket is still yours. The value remaining on your ticket is the total of the ticket prices of the cancelled segments. If you purchased a non-...


23

Speculation. You booked a TLV-MEX fare on BA on the understanding it was refundable. The standard refundable or partially refundable economy booking classes on BA are Y, B and H, the cheapest of those, being H. A sample TLV H fare on matrix is fully refundable: REFUND WITHOUT PENALTY PERMITTED AT ANY TIME This half-round trip fare is $830, plus YQ and ...


23

If it is a private (or “hidden”) fare then the price your travel agent pays for your seat is a commercially private matter between your agent and his liaison at the airline. (It is probably not the fare that you paid him.) It is, to put it succinctly, a secret. In order to compute the cost of your upgrade, the airline employee needs to know what the ...


22

Some hotels don't have minibars, and you could seek those would when traveling when possible. Some hotels are willing to remove/empty/lock the minibar upon request. Some guests may be on school trips or be recovering alcoholics not wanting to sleep next to a bar. I'd call the hotel front desk (not the central reservations office for a chain, but the actual ...


19

Are Qatar Airways at fault? Legally, no, other than perhaps for the loss of your buggy though that depends on circumstances you have not detailed. Should all our flights be re-instated ?? No. Are we entitled to compensation? No. Should they reimburse our expenses? No. Airlines hate it when their passengers are refused entry. It can ...


18

You are eligible for comensation under the European Union's EU261 compensation rules. Your flight would classify as a "type 2" flight, which for a cancellation occurring less than 1 week before departure, resulting in an arrival delay of more than 3 hours, would be due €400 compensation, paid in cash (ie, not vouchers/discounts/etc). You should contact the ...


16

An airline is not required to check your visa and entry compliance before selling you an air ticket. You can buy a ticket for any destination even when you do not have a passport. Check-in staff normally checks your visa before they give you your boarding pass and the first flight was to Dubai where your daughter did not require a prior visa so the airline ...


16

If you were to claim any damages, who would you blame? The airline doesn't control the passport systems. The delay for departure may have to do with incoming aircraft, which may have been delayed due to weather (again, not an airline problem). The airline offered you a quicker alternate (your choice); which got you to your destination along with your ...


15

It's rather common for unpublished fares to subject to special rules including a "no upgrades" policy. These are discount fares offered through travel agents and consolidators, generally for the leisure market. They offer a way to airlines to sell cheaper space to price-sensitive travelers without having to cut prices for those who may be willing to pay more....


12

Sorry, but no. If you have travel insurance they may cover any additional costs you've had - check your policy. Next time, book a longer connection.


12

Based on the sequence of events you posted, here's the problem. You seem to believe that there should have been a step #2.5: you write back and accept their offer. The problem, in my opinion, is that you can't have it both ways: had you shown up at the hotel at step #3 instead of getting ill, you would have rightly expected them to have a room ready for you....


12

Disclaimer: this is from my personal experience as someone that used to work for fare calculations at a decently big airline (star alliance member) The refund amount for a partially used ticket is calculated by your ticket price - oneway price of the segment you used - any refund penalties. You mentioned multiple times in comments you have done the math ...


12

You can't prove it, at best -- I do not know how Berlin has this -- you might have a record of passing through security if the boarding pass was scanned. But even so, it'd be very hard to prove your friend haven't passed the time drinking in the bar and became a no show. If you go for a full blown court trial then witnesses might help of course but otherwise....


11

You are wholly and fully responsible for any entry or travel requirements put in place by your destination or transit countries. The airline may remind you and assist you, but they are not in any way responsible for informing you of any requirements. As an aside, the eTA was not just introduced 7 weeks ago, its been in place since March 2016 and was ...


9

No they have no obligation. Visa requirements are highly complicated and depend on many factors, not just which country issued your passport. It is your job as the traveller to understand whatever visa requirements or other restrictions as they apply to you individually. Incidentally, you did not need a visa if you were arriving on an international flight ...


9

Based on your sequence of events: Yes, from step 2 onwards you have undergone a contract with the hotel. Your step 1 was ‘please book a room’. Their step 2 was ‘we confirm your booking’. In my economy and law classes back in high school, step one would have been termed offer and step 2 acceptance of offer. As per the BGB (Bürgerliches Gesetzbuch, German ...


9

Out of curiosity I went onto British Airways to see the difference in round trip vs one way trips. Round trip prices was around $1000 total. ($500 outbound and $500 inbound). Looking at one way trips the only option they gave was a "World Traveller" operated by BA which had a ticket price of $3,000. This date was just chosen at random (but was the ...


8

Definitely talk to their customer relations people. While I've never had any reason to talk to their customer service, this is the kind of thing that their customer service employees are paid to handle. Definitely emphasize the travel delays, the incidental expenses that were incurred, and the fact that they booked you on tight connections. Also, look at ...


8

Airlines and tour companies are usually not obliged to give refunds on travel warnings. After all It's not their fault. The only exceptions are if they are unable - or unwilling - to actually provide the services you paid for, for example it's so dangerous they won't fly to your airport. For any other circumstances you are expected to claim from your travel ...


8

I am not a lawyer but... When you book a room, and the booking is accepted, you have entered a contract. If you don't follow through on that contract the hotel is entitled to cancellation fees according to the contract. The hotel sent you a confirmation of booking. If you had not meant to book you should have corrected them at that stage. But by your own ...


8

The other answers (to whom +1) have cast light on the moral aspect of your question and I agree with them, you can not expect service (even if not used) at no risk/cost for you. I mean, you got one of the last rooms in town because of the conference and they likely lost on big cash because of your no-show. During big events cancellation terms often are more ...


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