27

From the Ukrainian point of view, Russia illegally occupied the Ukrainian region of Crimea in 2014. As a result, transport options have been restricted from both the Ukrainian and the Russian side. In addition, it is now necessary to have a Russian visa (or visa-free passport) in order to access the Crimean territory. Flights In September 2015, all flights ...


22

You could simply list Russia(Crimea) as @gerrit had suggested but at the moment while not being recognized (by most) as part of Russia it's immigration and border control is administered by Russia: In March 2014, Russia occupied the Crimean Peninsula, which remains part of Ukraine notwithstanding Russia’s illegal military intervention. At this time the ...


21

Was it ever a tourist destination? Not known for it, no. Generally tourism requires some infrastructure and base population to support it. The islands consist of five uninhabited islets and three barren rocks. This is not to say that people haven't lived there or tried to occupy in the past. They've been used at various stages as: fishing islands a ...


18

Unfortunately in this case common sense trumps political pride: entering Taiwan is considered leaving China, and you'll thus need a multiple-entry visa to get back to the mainland. (Incidentally, the same applies to Hong Kong and Macau.) I'm having trouble finding an authoritative source, but this random Chinese visa agent (apparently banned here, replace '...


14

Legally speaking, no, you can't. The Republic of Cyprus's (ROC) position on this is clear: the Turkish occupation of the northern half of the island is illegal, and they do not recognize the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus's (TRNC) authority. Therefore, if you enter Cyprus via the TRNC, you are an illegal immigrant as far as the ROC is concerned and ...


12

This story about a man who visited Bir Tawil (and claimed it as the "Kingdom of North Sudan" so his 8-year-old girl could be a princess, but that's another story) says that permission for the Egyptian authorities was required: This research led Heaton to seek permission from Egyptian authorities to travel to the remote, unpopulated plot of sand, ...


12

The only legal way to enter Abkhazia is from the territory of Zugdidi Municipality. There is no other way! According to Georgian law on Occupied Territories (Article 4) in all other cases you will inevitably violate the law and fall under criminal responsibility by Georgian laws.


11

USA, as most of the international community does not recognise Crimea as other than a division of Ukraine you should include Ukraine in your list, where Russia is presumably going to feature anyway if you have been living there.


10

Having some passport not recognized by some country is not that unusual. It's pretty much certain to happen somewhere for passports of countries with partial recognition. Someone else mentioned passports of Northern Cyprus (which is only recognized by Turkey), which according to Wikipedia, is only accepted in 6 countries. But there are many other countries ...


9

A few years ago, I visited both (on a Dutch passport). I traveled from the Ukraine, through Transnistria, to Moldova, by train. I got off the train in Moldova, then traveled to Transnistria, went through some formalities at the 'border' and returned to Moldova before traveling onwards. If I remember correctly, getting off the train in Transnistria, from the ...


9

The US State Department website indicates (updated after the executive order): The Department of State warns U.S. citizens to defer all travel to the eastern regions of Donetsk and Luhansk. In addition, Russian military forces continue to occupy the Crimean Peninsula and are present on the eastern border of Ukraine. It does not explicitly ban it, ...


9

All flights between countries in the Schengen zone are international flights but the rules for domestic flights apply, with shorter check-in, no immigration formalities on either end. There are true domestic flights, like within France or within Spain, which are just leaving from the 'within Schengen area'.


8

One case I know is Northern Cyprus. In the wake of the 1974 invasion, Turkey created a new state that still administers a part of the island. That state is recognized (and strongly influenced) by Turkey. Its situation (generally unrecognized but accepted by another country) is therefore in a way the “reverse” of Israel's situation (widely recognized but ...


8

China and Taiwan, even though China does not officially acknowledge Taiwan's existence, do allow citizens from each others' country to visit. Yes, they have to jump through hoops, but it's allowed. In fact from what I've heard during my travels in Taiwan, there's a lot of economic interdependence between the two countries now. I've also met travellers (...


8

The three destinations you list are in Taiwan. There is absolutely no way for any company, in any field, operating in PRC, acknowledging Taiwan as a foreign country1. For the PRC the official position is that Taiwan is part of China (even if not under their control); they are VERY sensitive about the issue and any statements that goes agains that are ...


8

It sounds like they're simply becoming more serious about it. If, if a non-EU citizen enters the TRNC and crosses over to the ROC, then, if leaving the island through a ROC airport, usually the TRNC stamp will merely be crossed out and replaced with a retroactive ROC entry stamp. However, formally a non-EU citizen entering the TRNC can be heavily penalised ...


7

It's been a while since I visited Cyprus. But I doubt things have gotten worse; There are only a few border crossings, but crossing the border is quite painless, though the setting might resemble crossing from East to West Berlin before German unification. Public transport, on both sides, was limited when I was there. It should be possible to take a rental ...


7

Your first problem would be entering the territory of Abkhazia. It is recognized as a country by Russia, Venezuela, Nicaragua and Nauru. Other countries recognize Abkhazia as part of Georgia, so from the perspective of Germany, you'd be travelling to Georgia. As you say, Russian citizens can enter Abkhazia without a visa, and can also enter the rest of ...


6

Depends on the nationality of your passport but if its UK or American you should be fine (ie http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/asia/300230-any-problems-entering-china-w-taiwan-passport-stamp.html)


6

The David Gareja monastery area is very close to the border between Georgia and Azerbaijan, a few hundred meters away. If you went wandering in the hills, it's quite possible that you might enter Azerbaijan. The border is disputed. While the two countries agree on where the official border lays, Georgia contends that this location was artificially imposed ...


6

I suppose US border agency does not require that you follow latest news from around the world, and then accept the recommended point of view on disputable matters. You did not cross de-facto Ukrainian border - you don't list it. Then you don't need to tell whether Crimea belongs to Russian Federation or Ukraine: both consider it as their own part, so you ...


6

Don't fly into Ercan Airport, because you will be breaking the law of an EU member nation-the Republic of Cyprus. It's a matter of ethics, not practicality. On top of it, flights into Ercan Airport are not controlled by the International FAA rules and procedures, so safety is a concern as well. Those airlines that do fly into Ercan routinely ignore Flight ...


5

This is absolutely untrue. The ONLY legal way to enter occupied territories is to enter Georgia first through official checkpoint, and then visit Abkhazia or, God forbid, South Ossetia through, again, official Georgian temporary checkpoint. My Czech friend did this last year and had no problems whatsoever. But if you have Abkhazian stamp from Psou or any ...


5

Just in case others are still looking at this question and answers - if you have any of the passports listed in answer 1 above, there is absolutely no problem at all flying into Ercan airport and then crossing to the ROC and back. I have an Australian passport and I have had a holiday home in TRNC for 8 years. I work in the Middle East, I regularly travel to ...


5

In April 2012 I entered Abkhazia from Zugdidi on an EU passport with a printed permission from the Abkhazian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. You just have to e-mail them and you should get it back within a few days. There's a bridge over the Ingur river. You have to walk 1km or so between the checkpoints and then you can catch a local bus further on. I left to ...


5

Short version: The David Gareja site straddles the border between Georgia and Azerbaijan. There was an episode in 2012 where the Azerbaijan authorities stopped tourists crossing to their side. The temporary resolution to that episode is still holding. Your images demonstrate that you crossed the border, evidently without issue. The caves in your ...


5

I traveled to both Abkhazia and Georgia this month on a U.S. passport, and wanted to share my experience in case it's useful to andynitrox or anyone else. I crossed into Abkhazia from Russia at Psou, spent a few days in Sukhumi and Gagra, then crossed back to Russia at Psou. To do that, I needed a double-entry Russian visa. At the Psou border, I asked the ...


5

Unlike Abkhazia, South Ossetia cannot be entered from Georgia - the border officers won't let you pass. So you have to enter from Russia, which is illegal by Georgian law. However, passports aren't stamped (even when exiting and re-entering Russia), so unless you run your mouth to the Georgians, there's absolutely no way for them to know.


4

People's Republic of China doesn't recognize Taiwan passports (Republic of China passports). Taiwan in turn doesn't recognize passports issued by PRC. See Wikipedia: Mainland Travel Permit for Taiwan Residents


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible