27

From the Ukrainian point of view, Russia illegally occupied the Ukrainian region of Crimea in 2014. As a result, transport options have been restricted from both the Ukrainian and the Russian side. In addition, it is now necessary to have a Russian visa (or visa-free passport) in order to access the Crimean territory. Flights In September 2015, all flights ...


23

You could simply list Russia(Crimea) as @gerrit had suggested but at the moment while not being recognized (by most) as part of Russia it's immigration and border control is administered by Russia: In March 2014, Russia occupied the Crimean Peninsula, which remains part of Ukraine notwithstanding Russia’s illegal military intervention. At this time the ...


21

Was it ever a tourist destination? Not known for it, no. Generally tourism requires some infrastructure and base population to support it. The islands consist of five uninhabited islets and three barren rocks. This is not to say that people haven't lived there or tried to occupy in the past. They've been used at various stages as: fishing islands a ...


18

Unfortunately in this case common sense trumps political pride: entering Taiwan is considered leaving China, and you'll thus need a multiple-entry visa to get back to the mainland. (Incidentally, the same applies to Hong Kong and Macau.) I'm having trouble finding an authoritative source, but this random Chinese visa agent (apparently banned here, replace '...


14

It seems to depend on what passport you have. Both the tourist information website and the Ecran Airport site say the same thing. For tourist trips of up to 90 days, citiziens of European Union (EU) nations, Turkey, USA, Canada, Mexico, Israel, Japan, Singapore, Switzerland, Iceland, Norway, Australia, New Zealand do not require visa. It looks like all ...


13

The situation is very complicated. Georgia says that Abkhazia and South Ossetia are Georgian territories, and you can go there from Georgia by this border crossing: to Abkhazia from Zugdidi - my friends from Germany made such trip this year. But they say that they got some local help for the border-crossing, because Abkhazia trying to close the border to ...


13

There are 192 members by the UN (193 if you count the Vatican, which is an observer without voting rights). There are 196 that qualify as 'independent countries'. List of countries by capital. Arguments via about.com This is debatable. For instance, I would say Taiwan is a country... many people would disagree with me. Scotland and Wales I would not count ...


13

Legally speaking, no, you can't. The Republic of Cyprus's (ROC) position on this is clear: the Turkish occupation of the northern half of the island is illegal, and they do not recognize the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus's (TRNC) authority. Therefore, if you enter Cyprus via the TRNC, you are an illegal immigrant as far as the ROC is concerned and ...


12

This story about a man who visited Bir Tawil (and claimed it as the "Kingdom of North Sudan" so his 8-year-old girl could be a princess, but that's another story) says that permission for the Egyptian authorities was required: This research led Heaton to seek permission from Egyptian authorities to travel to the remote, unpopulated plot of sand, ...


11

The Travelers' Century Club, or TCC, is a club for people who have visited 100 or more countries. However these guys have their own definition of a country, from Wikipedia: The TCC has a fairly loose definition of what constitutes a country and has established its own list of currently 321 "countries". This includes not only sovereign states but also ...


11

USA, as most of the international community does not recognise Crimea as other than a division of Ukraine you should include Ukraine in your list, where Russia is presumably going to feature anyway if you have been living there.


11

The only legal way to enter Abkhazia is from the territory of Zugdidi Municipality. There is no other way! Georgian Ministry of Foreign Affairs states, that in all other cases you will inevitably violate the law and fall under criminal responsibility by Georgian laws.


10

Having some passport not recognized by some country is not that unusual. It's pretty much certain to happen somewhere for passports of countries with partial recognition. Someone else mentioned passports of Northern Cyprus (which is only recognized by Turkey), which according to Wikipedia, is only accepted in 6 countries. But there are many other countries ...


10

The situation is very complicated. Georgia says that Abkhazia and South Ossetia are Georgian territories, and you can go there from Georgia by this border crossing: to South Ossetia from Gori - my friends from Germany made a trip this year. If you get into these territories not by these points, you would get problems (fee from $1200 or jail up to 5 years!) ...


9

Yes this is possible 100%. I just came back from a visit to Armenia and Nagorno Karabagh. The visa agent at Nagorno Karabagh will ask you if you want to have the visa on a separate paper. This is very common since most foreign visitors will prefer it this way. That was my experience. If one agent forgets to ask just ask it yourself, they are willing to do it....


9

The US State Department website indicates (updated after the executive order): The Department of State warns U.S. citizens to defer all travel to the eastern regions of Donetsk and Luhansk. In addition, Russian military forces continue to occupy the Crimean Peninsula and are present on the eastern border of Ukraine. It does not explicitly ban it, ...


9

A few years ago, I visited both (on a Dutch passport). I traveled from the Ukraine, through Transnistria, to Moldova, by train. I got off the train in Moldova, then traveled to Transnistria, went through some formalities at the 'border' and returned to Moldova before traveling onwards. If I remember correctly, getting off the train in Transnistria, from the ...


9

All flights between countries in the Schengen zone are international flights but the rules for domestic flights apply, with shorter check-in, no immigration formalities on either end. There are true domestic flights, like within France or within Spain, which are just leaving from the 'within Schengen area'.


8

You can also get a visa in Transnistria, which might be an interesting place to visit for you as you seem to be keen on countries with legal definition problems. The Wikipedia article seems not to be totally up-to-date with that information as it says there are only 2 embassies abroad (Russia and Venezuela). Although I must admit that I didn t see it myself ...


8

I don't think its possible. When we went there last year they insisted on placing a full-page sticker visa into our passports. You might be lucky, but I don't think there is an official way to get it done.


8

The two most authoritative answers are from United Nations already mentioned, and from FIFA which counts 208 members.


8

China and Taiwan, even though China does not officially acknowledge Taiwan's existence, do allow citizens from each others' country to visit. Yes, they have to jump through hoops, but it's allowed. In fact from what I've heard during my travels in Taiwan, there's a lot of economic interdependence between the two countries now. I've also met travellers (...


8

The three destinations you list are in Taiwan. There is absolutely no way for any company, in any field, operating in PRC, acknowledging Taiwan as a foreign country1. For the PRC the official position is that Taiwan is part of China (even if not under their control); they are VERY sensitive about the issue and any statements that goes agains that are ...


8

It sounds like they're simply becoming more serious about it. If, if a non-EU citizen enters the TRNC and crosses over to the ROC, then, if leaving the island through a ROC airport, usually the TRNC stamp will merely be crossed out and replaced with a retroactive ROC entry stamp. However, formally a non-EU citizen entering the TRNC can be heavily penalised ...


7

One case I know is Northern Cyprus. In the wake of the 1974 invasion, Turkey created a new state that still administers a part of the island. That state is recognized (and strongly influenced) by Turkey. Its situation (generally unrecognized but accepted by another country) is therefore in a way the “reverse” of Israel's situation (widely recognized but ...


7

It's been a while since I visited Cyprus. But I doubt things have gotten worse; There are only a few border crossings, but crossing the border is quite painless, though the setting might resemble crossing from East to West Berlin before German unification. Public transport, on both sides, was limited when I was there. It should be possible to take a rental ...


7

Your first problem would be entering the territory of Abkhazia. It is recognized as a country by Russia, Venezuela, Nicaragua and Nauru. Other countries recognize Abkhazia as part of Georgia, so from the perspective of Germany, you'd be travelling to Georgia. As you say, Russian citizens can enter Abkhazia without a visa, and can also enter the rest of ...


6

The David Gareja monastery area is very close to the border between Georgia and Azerbaijan, a few hundred meters away. If you went wandering in the hills, it's quite possible that you might enter Azerbaijan. The border is disputed. While the two countries agree on where the official border lays, Georgia contends that this location was artificially imposed ...


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