74

I think the key word in your initial statement is that you heard about it. The fact that this occurred was deemed serious enough that it made it to the international news outlets. Now, of course, that's not to say that every such incident makes the news, but it does mean that such incidents are obviously rare or there would be more than very occasional ...


51

There have been Jews in India for 2500 years, and largely without experiencing anti-Semitism. Even if there was a sudden, historically unprecedented upswing in hostility or violence against Jews, it wouldn't affect you personally. While you may regard yourself as obviously Jewish, in a country with thousands of different ethnic and cultural groups, you ...


45

I fail to see where in this case, quoted in the question, that it is a clear case of discrimination. Two other Air Canada employees then approached Fatima, reiterating she must remove the head covering because she wasn’t wearing one in her passport photo. From the text, I assume, we are talking about a US Citizen with a US Passport. Passport Photos You ...


34

Probably not. It seems very unlikely. First of all, India is quite a multicultural society with hundreds of various creeds and lots of religions. There is a longstanding tradition of being tolerant to other religions. Also, there is very little antisemitism in India, see the quote at the bottom of this answer. Moreover, I don't think many people would ...


21

It's a pub staffed by Filipina hostesses. All offer drinks and conversation, most do karaoke (Filipinos love their karaoke!), some have dancing and shows. The term itself doesn't connotate sexual services, although the virtue of some ladies may well be negotiable after-hours. The phenomenon started when the bursting of Japan's economic bubble led to a ...


20

Depends entirely on the establishment. Those businesses set their own policies and get to choose who's allowed in and who's not based entirely on their own whims. Some allow people who speak Japanese, some won't let anybody who looks foreign. And prejudice doesn't have to make any sense: a while back, in the Otaru onsen case that ended up in court, one ...


20

The best thing you can do is to carefully study the rules & regulations that unfortunately are different for every country & airline. As long as you are operating within the stated rules you and your family should be ok. Millions of Muslims fly every day without any sort trouble or incidents. If you feel that any specific rule or regulation is ...


14

Not at all. I lived in Georgia from November 2011 to May 2012 and there were lots of people visiting from nearby Muslim and Arab countries. In fact Georgia seemed one of the easiest countries to travel to for various Muslim and Arab countries going by conversations I had with people I met while working there in a backpacker hostel. I think in terms of ...


11

Namaste! In my experience, and my opinion, behaving in a friendly and respectful AND assertive manner goes a long way. I am a what people would call a "white South African", and have travelled in Turkey, Greece, Egypt and Indonesia, to name a few. In spite of dressing modestly (long skirts, arms completely covered and hair covered) I was constantly ...


10

As someone who traveled to India before with identifiable Jews (I'm secular myself). Me and fellow travelers in my party have found Bangalore to not be risky for Jews. I've also talked to several travelers since and they confirmed this. A more official source is the Israeli government's anti-terror office which issues travel warnings in Israel. It's in ...


10

I will speak on this topic based on my own experience of having lived here in Japan for 8 years as well as being familiar with the experiences of many other non-Japanese people: One of the most important things to note here is that Japanese society strongly encourages people not to give voice to judgements they have about people who are not in their in-...


10

Note: I refer to the TSA in this answer, but it applies to pretty much anyone (who has some authority over you) that you deal with at the airport. What are my rights as a passenger to prevent such discrimination? How can I prevent airline employees from insulting me and my family in front of everyone at the airport? Answering your question ...


9

Non-muslims are allowed to enter Saudi Arabia freely. However, they are prohibited from entering two areas: The entire city of Makkah. The city of Medina, except for the outskirts (most notably, the area around the airport and its surroundings). They are strictly prohibited near the center of the city, near the areas of the Prophet's Mosque. There is a ...


9

What criteria would you use to label people xenophobic? And would these criteria really reflect your own experience visiting these places? In an article on xenophobia in European cities published in "Business Insider", the criterion is the answer "strongly/somewhat disagree" to the statement "The presence of foreigners is good for the city" in the EU survey ...


9

Depending on what exactly your wife is wearing, you may consider avoiding travel to countries which tend to value secularism over religion. For instance, in France your wife can be fined for wearing a full-face veil in public areas, including airports. She can also be requested to show her hair for identification purposes, although if you insist, the check ...


8

Yes. It's obviously natural and logic way to do. If you have women-only dorms, you risk being not able to take extra backpacker even when you technically have free places (if they happen to be in female dorm and the backpacker is male) so they actually costs you more. You don't want to have a lot of female-only dorms so you want to discourage girls from ...


8

No. There were some cases when people with Armenian roots were not allowed into Azerbaijan even though technically they had 1/8th or even 1/16th of Armenian blood. There were also some documented cases when Armenians just end up in jail visiting Azerbaijan. It's not the same as Armenian visiting Turkey. If you can convince passport control that your ...


7

There's no hard/fast way to measure this. Do you do it on race? Or just foreigners? Or how they're treated in their country? Or the distribution of race in a country? One international means of 'measuring' might be to look at the "Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination" - a document with 86 signatories and 175 parties. Several ...


6

Absolutely not. India is very tolerant toward other religions. I myself have been there with my Jewish friend. There was this one kind old man who was having trouble carrying some sort of crate. My friend, Erik, rushed over to him and helped him out. The man was of Muslim faith, and he blessed Erik in a language I know: Hindi. Erik went all over the town ...


6

The only place children (and minors) cannot be seated is in the exit row. The same goes for anyone physically unable to operate the emergency equipment / exit doors; or is otherwise incapable (for example, there is a language barrier). Other than that, children are allowed on all sections of the aircraft where passengers are allowed. I have personally been ...


6

Well...this is difficult to answer, because how many is 'common'? However, I've stayed in hostels in Australia, New Zealand, all over Europe, Central and northern Asia, USA/Canada and South America, and I can't recall a time that I've seen them charge EXTRA for female dorms - EXCEPT when there were fewer beds. Now, it's fairly common to charge more for ...


5

One does not simply measure xenophobia. There is this long forum thread: Name the most/least xenophobic countries. This article, These 20 cities may be the most xenophobic in Europe, uses a survey (PDF in article). A black friend of mine told me that it was not possible for him to go to Russia because of racism, some internet research backs that up. ...


5

How can you claim compensation for the ticket if my friend has wrongly been denied boarding? Assuming the "Turkish official at the gate" was the Turkish Airlines agent (and not for example Turkish government official), then according to what you said and following the Turkish airlines Passengers Right document your friend should be eligible for "denied ...


4

Non Muslims are not allowed in prophets mosque in Medina also in Al Masjid Al Haram in Mecca. Non Muslim not allowed in all Mecca city but In Medina some prohibited area are not allowed non Muslims people, another area can access which also Saudi Arabia Government allowed.


3

As a traveler, you will not experience discrimination in Japan. Japnaese are clever people, and can tell if you have lived in Japan for a long time. If they feel you are a "gaijin" meaning you live in Japan but your not Japanese, then they will treat you as an outcast. gaijin means outcast or outsider; it has its roots in an ancient caste system leftover ...


3

The sign you're looking for: (source - although the image weirdly isn't showing up there, the post is, and I found it through google image search, but giving the site credit anyway)


3

1) Yes, they still exist, if you google for the term you will find websites of such bars. 2) They are essentially normal bars with elevated prices. It is not directly a part of the sex industry since the bar as such is not directly involved in prostitution. But I guess one can debate what the definition of "Sex industry" is. Please note that there are tons ...


3

In this museum in India, different fees are charged for Indians versus foreigners (₹10/150), and there's a fee for using a camera (₹50), which foreigners are more likely to do than locals. I assume that fees are based on the ability to pay, and foreigners are more likely to be able to pay more. At Yuransen Onsen in Japan, there were different onsens for ...


3

The answer is not a strict no. Officially and unambiguously, there's no such discrimination, as having such law would weaken the position of Azerbaijan in Nagorno-Karabakh conflict, where the proposed solution of the conflict by Azerbaijani side is the return of occupied territories to Azerbaijan while granting non-discriminating rights to all ethnic ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible