101

According to this link (only in German), it is to check if you have bought the ticket just right now or a sufficient amount of time before. The rules usually are, that you have to buy a ticket before you get on the train. Now, with mobile tickets, some "clever" people thought, they just need to buy a ticket when they see the conductor, and to ride free when ...


48

@dunni's answer describes the attack that this security measure attempts to mitgate. A comment on his answer claims that this is "security theatre"; I describe in this answer (because this explanation is too long to fit into a comment) why it is not. Most security measures cannot completely prevent attacks. An effective security measure is one that ...


47

Your ticket would still be valid for the whole journey. However if you have a seat reservation, officially you have to occupy your place within 15 minutes from departure, otherwise your seat reservation will be void (your ticket still is fine). Please note that your seat reservation is only kept for up to 15 minutes after the train has departed. Source: ...


41

TL;DR: Your ticket is still valid and you can take any connection to your destination (and it is not relevant if you booked a SuperSparpreis, Sparpreis or Flexpreis ticket) if your train/connection is expected to be delayed by at least 20 minutes at your destination or is cancelled at all. For more information have a look at Overview of the main passengers' ...


40

Most German trains have a mix of reserved and non-reserved seats. Passengers without a reservation often take reserved seats when they are empty as the train leaves the station (if there are no free non-reserved seats nearby). If the train is very crowded and people cannot go to their reserved seats, it is also common to just take any unoccupied seat to ...


38

The chances of you being "denied boarding" are very low. There is no pre boarding check, nobody is standing at the door counting passengers. So there is nobody to deny you boarding. What is possible is that the train is physically so full that the train cannot leave, and when it does happen it usually escalates to the point where a train will be ...


32

There is already a good answer: It provides an additional quick visual indicator in case the passenger bought the ticket only after entering the vehicle and spotting the conductor. But let's add some more context. Ticket controls do not usually pay for themselves with fines. Ticket controls are paid for by getting more people to buy tickets. The goal of ...


19

This question (and the current answers) are out of date. As of 1 October 2016 Deutsche Bahn no longer requires an identification card but only an official identity document (or their Bahncard). Per their help pages (in German, I was unable to find an English version) Ab dem 01.10.2016: Identifikation per amtlichen Lichtbildausweis Bei Buchungen ...


19

Print two copies of your e-ticket, so you can each go through independently. This may have the added advantage that if one of you visits the loo or otherwise needs to walk through the train, you can take a copy of the ticket with you. You might want to do that anyway, as the train manager may ask you to present your ticket at any time (at your seat or when ...


18

The numbering scheme is based on historical international standards. Those were originally developed for compartment coaches, which is why always two rows are considered together (one compartment had two rows of opposing seats). The numbers aren’t consecutive because the first digit is the “compartment number”, independent of the place number in each ...


18

You typically get the price of reservations for trains that didn't run reimbursed. If you booked a flexible ticket and had to use trains of a lesser category for the whole, journey, you can also get the surcharge back. However, you only get the difference to the local-train-only regular price tickets back, not the price difference to the "Baden-Württemberg ...


17

It's available on most ICE routes, but not all. Cost wise there it's 4,95€ a day in standard class, though there's a small number of roaming partners with whom you can get online in standard class too (mostly T-Mobile Germany though). It used to be paid-for in first class as well, but as of late 2014, it's now free for first class customers (matching what ...


17

With the 1st class ticket you will get a more comfortable seat with more legroom for the 6 hour journey, and a free seat reservation(normally €4.50). For me that would be far more important that access to the lounge for a few minutes before the journey, and and definitely worth the €10(normally the price differential is much more). I don't know how I can ...


17

Scanning printed tickets on Dutch railway stations is purely to open the gates. So if there is no gate you do not need to scan, it even says such on the Dutch (NS) self print railway tickets. Scanning the ticket will open the gate, usually long enough to walk through with two people. You can then scan the ticket on the inside of the gate (be sure you have a ...


14

Since 1 January 2017 there is Wi-Fi in all ICE-Trains. From DB-Homepage: In first class we offer you worry-free internet access. With the internet provided in first class you can work efficiently and even send and receive large mail attachments. You can also watch videos or listen to music. In second class you can use the internet for free, but ...


14

I think I found it. I was tipped off by another weird train abbreviation, RJ. A quick search reveals that RJ stands for RailJet, an Austrian Railways train. So I went to their website and searched for the same route and, unsurprisingly, got the same timetable as in the screenshot in the question. But there was something more: an operator name. M seems to ...


13

Wifi is available on the majority of ICE trains (>90%), but it is not guaranteed to work (so you won't get a rebate in case it does not work). Whether you get Internet on your trip also depends on the route that you are taking. A short search at bahn.de reveals that most likely you will take the ICE between Dusseldorf and Berlin (which has Wifi/Internet ...


13

I have been in Berlin for four weeks(!) in school summer holiday 2004 (age 18). It wasn't boring at all during that time, although I must admit that I spent some days in museums and at Wannsee Tegeler See, as well as at the "open doors" weekend of the federal government. But still, Berlin has enough attractions to entirely fill your weekend - museums, ...


13

This depends on the precise destination on the ticket. If it says "+City", then you are allowed to take another train to get to your destination within the city. This option exists for major cities only and the area and conditions vary from city to city. In Munich most of the city is included, shown as "Innenraum" on the local transit maps. Please see @...


12

If you can really sleep in buses and there are tickets for the buses you plan to take, you can do it. But most people will be broken after a night in a bus, sleep only little or lightly and will not do well to do it more than one night running. Trains might be a little better but not by enough and they are more expensive. There is no direct overnight train ...


12

The solidus designates a bounded area ("Raumbegrenzung"). Any route that passes through the designated stations or between them is covered by the ticket. The asterisk means that the route must pass through the named station. I suspect, but have found no online confirmation of this, that the asterisk has priority over the solidus, because assuming the ...


11

The Sparpreis-Europa (ex-EuropaSpezial) fares might be a good solution. You can search for these using the Sparpreis-Finder. If you only want to try the ICE without necessarily going abroad, there is also a similar type of discounted fares for domestric travel. In both cases, you have to book long in advance, be somewhat flexible with timing and commit to a ...


11

There is a special stamp to prove you're entitled to hop on the next available train: The text in the upper bubble roughly means, 'The HOTNAT stamp indicates approval for using THA'. The image is taken from page 9 of this document: https://www.cit-rail.org/media/files/public/Passenger/AJC_AppxII_Delay%20confirmation_Stamps_EN_2017-07-01.pdf. Ideally, if ...


10

I wrote an email to DB asking about this, and they responded, Sie können nur ein Identifikationsnachweise nutzen, wo auch der Name eingetragen ist. My translation: You can only use a proof of identity which shows the name.


10

If the destination on your ticket is written as "München Hauptbahnhof" or "Munich Hauptbahnhof", then your ticket is only valid to that station. However, if the destination on your ticket is written as "München" or "MÜNCHEN", then a mechanism called "Tarifliche Gleichstellung" has effect, which means, that your ticket is valid to all stations within the city,...


10

The railways in Germany are very good in offering alternative transport if the train you have planned to use can not be used for whatever reason. First thing to do, ask any person sitting near you to explain, if they can. Next look for a person in an uniform. And if non is near, go to the ticket office in the station you are. The uniformed staff or ticket ...


9

This answer is outdated. See mts' answer below. Neither DB's homepage nor their terms of service have clear definition of what constitutes a credit card. The only things that are mentioned in the terms of service are that it needs to: show a name have a number be machine readable (i.e. has a magnetic strip) The website additionally includes it needs ...


9

Before I answer, part of your question is off-topic by our rules and I will only answer the on-topic parts. Please see our asking help. 1) This is very little time for each city but who is to judge, if you have only one weekend and want to see both, go for it. Your experience will be different of course. It is doable in any case, see below. Note that ...


9

You or your adviser misunderstood something. You will not need to show the credit/debit card as proof of ID while purchasing the Bahncard online (how are you going to show a credit card online?) You will need to prove your ID later - if you buy a train ticket online and the ticket controller asks you to present an identity document. This document must not ...


9

Deutsche Bahn confirm here (and in other answers on their community site) that it is permitted: Man kann die Probebahncard bestellen so oft man möchte. Aber auch eine Probebahncard ist ein Abo und muss spätestens 6 Wochen vor Gültigkeitsende gekündigt werden. ("One can order the Probe Bahncard as often as one likes. But even a Probe Bahncard is a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible