72

In general, the UK and the US partner closely and it's highly likely that the US will be aware of the UK deportation. If your brother claims he has not been deported, but the US has evidence that he was, the visa will be rejected for lying on the application and it will be very difficult to ever visit the US. I would advise that he disclose the deportation ...


55

An embassy's premises are "inviolable" by the authorities of the host country, so the host country couldn't prevent the embassy from detaining anyone there. The embassy would have a hard time getting someone out of the host country without the cooperation of host country authorities, however. Of course, even if the UK could protect your friend, there is no ...


53

Assuming that your friend is in a conflict with the bureaucracy of his home country, a much more likely problem is that the consulate will simply refuse to extend the passport and your friend would be forced to either leave the UK or apply for asylum there. Kidnapping, assaulting or killing someone at a foreign consulate is guaranteed to cause a diplomatic ...


45

I'm sorry to hear this, and hope you find a way to rebuild in Nigeria. The UK government has a scheme to help in just this situation: see https://www.gov.uk/return-home-voluntarily Even if you think you do not meet the criteria on the website, I strongly suggest getting in contact with them, as they likely have some degree of discretion. Buying you a plane ...


41

People will often mistakenly use 'deportation' instead of 'removal'. The media reinforces this mistake because 'deportation' sounds more dramatic than 'removal'. Both terms involve the involuntary departure of a person from the UK's jurisdiction. Deportation in the UK is a grave event, there have only been a handful this year. The profile of a deportee ...


40

There is pretty much nothing you can do to change this. A ban means exactly that - you are not allowed to enter the Schengen area until the ban is over. There are a small number of exceptions, but to have any hope of using them you need to employ an experienced lawyer specializing in these cases. This will be very expensive and have little chance of ...


37

The airline will collect Secure Flight information when checking you in, but there is no restriction preventing you from flying over US airspace just because you're inadmissible to the US. So you'll be fine - you just need the documents for transiting Canada and entering Germany.


33

Flying over USA airspace is not a problem. What is a problem is that Canada, like the USA but unlike many other countries, requires you to have a transit visa in advance. Peru is not on the list of visa-exempt countries. The Canadian authorities may know that you were deported and banned from the United States, and if so, I think your chances of getting the ...


20

Typically, at the point of departure, it is only the airline that checks if the person to fly has the necessary documentation to enter the country of destination. They may or may not have access to systems to verify the validity of the visa - but this is also not their task to do. All they need to check is if they the documentation is "obviously" not enough. ...


19

Looks to me like you're in for a 3 year ban, but you better check that yourself and take a look at the paperwork you got. This law firm has been so nice to provide a translation of the "Operation Directions for Banning Entry of Aliens (禁止外國人入國作業規定)". You should really have a look at it yourself, find the neat PDF here. There is also a slightly older ...


19

It depends; there is no definite "yes" or "no" answer to this question. It might even depend only on the mood of the immigration officer who processes your new visa application. In general, however, it is always best to be truthful in all aspects of your visa application (I'm not saying you weren't before, despite what they thought). That means that if the ...


18

I'm sorry to hear about your troubles. This answer has a list of how long bans last. Two of the options are: "if they left the UK voluntarily, not at public expense" (I have reworded slightly), and "if they left UK voluntarily, at public expense". Hence it is clearly possible to get the Home Office to pay for your return flight. I suggest you get in ...


15

He will be allowed to overfly the country. Overflying is not considering entering the country for immigration purposes, and such arrangements are governed by international treaties. In particular for Community Carriers operating within the EU it is governed by Regulation EC 1008/2008 Chapter III Article 15 Community air carriers shall be entitled to ...


14

This is not about a "stamp in the passport". If you've been deported, then yes - it can affect your chances of getting into other countries. Even if you get a new passport and get rid of the stamp, that will not change anything. For example, on the Canadian visa application, there's a question - "Have you ever been... ordered to leave Canada or any other ...


14

For the purposes of Swedish law you were 'avvisad', which is translated as 'refused entry' in the official English edition of the Aliens Act. This term covers all kind of rejections at the border. Someone who is already present in Sweden and for some reason found unworthy to stay, will be 'expelled'. Swedish law uses the term 'expulsion' for any act of '...


13

You cannot land in the US (does not matter if it is only a transit). However, I am not seeing any issues with getting a flight to Canada. You need to have in the mind that you will need to land in Canada. So, maybe, you will need a Visa+ for that. Could you go to Europe avoiding US or Canada? Yes, you can... You could go to Brazil and get a flight to ...


12

You're out of luck. Under the Singapore Immigration Act you are specifically prohibited under Part II, Sec. 8, Para 3d: (d) any person who — (i) has been convicted in any country or state of an offence for which a sentence of imprisonment has been passed for any term; (ii) has not received a free pardon; and (iii) by reason of the ...


12

If your friend is a Syrian citizen, then I have a thing or two to say regarding this since I live in a country with more than 2 million Syrian refugees, they're not called refugees here, they have special treatment allowing them to move freely, work and study. However, having many Syrian colleagues who have been through the same exact issue as your friend, ...


11

There are actually two intertwingled questions here: First, virtually every country requires that (if requested) you demonstrate the ability to support yourself for the duration of your stay. For example, if you fly to the US and then declare at immigration that you only have $10 and intend to sleep on the streets for the next two months, you will ...


10

You haven't provided many details and I know next to nothing about Swedish criminal law so I am not sure I will be able to provide a comprehensive answer to all your questions but I can at least say two things about bans and how they are enforced in the EU: Since the borders between them are open, Schengen countries share a database where they can register ...


10

The DS-160 form which is used for B1/B2 visa applications never actually asks you about deportations or removals from countries other than the US. Therefore your brother would only have to disclose his former transgression if asked so directly during the visa interview. The likelihood of that happening is impossible to estimate accurately, but should that ...


10

On the other side of the pond, on the US/Canada border, it is routine for a traveler to be told (over something non-scary like "forgot ID"), in as many words, that "this is a really good time for you to withdraw your application to enter our country". (Because if you pressed onward with your application, you would be refused, and that would have immigration ...


10

A first step would be to get clear about what happened and why. I'm not a lawyer, but a deportation is distinct from a ban: An Abschiebung is the deportation of a foreigner who has an Ausweisung (order to leave Germany) but did not leave on his or her own. The Abschiebung ends when the foreigner has left Germany. The Ausweisung would have included a ...


9

Immigration officers from the country you are leaving usually do not care much. I guess some might do something if they notice a problem but checking whether you are likely to get in trouble later on is not their mission. Note that some countries don't have any formal immigration check on exit… Airlines everywhere do check whether passengers have ...


8

No. If the ban is over, no waiver is needed. As a Canadian citizen wanting to visit the US, you would simply travel with your Canadian passport to a US port of entry to seek entry as a Canadian usually would. No other action or application is needed. The decision of whether to let you in as a visitor is with the immigration officer at entry, as always.


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