29

Millions of smartphones and 10's (if not 100's) of thousands of Kindles/E-book readers go through airport scanners every day. So far I believe the number that have apparently been damaged by airport scanner stands at about 2 for Kindle, and I've never heard of a smartphone being damaged by any form of scanners. (And in the case of the Kindles there's ...


19

The airline is definitely liable for the contents as well but that's not what the answer you received is about. For example, you can get compensated if your luggage is lost completely and not only for the price of a new bag. But airlines do not have to accept liability for valuable items (unless you declared them as such) or improperly packed, fragile or ...


17

Absolutely. Just on Monday there I arrived at London Gatwick in heavy rain. Took them 50 mins to offload plane and load bag onto carousel (strangely mine was the first on the carousel). Bag was soaked through, top compartment (containing best suit I was due to wear to job interview), was soaked through (was in suit carrier, inside bag zipped compartment). ...


17

I suspect you'll have no trouble at all. My wife & I recently flew to the US from the UK with a brand new (and very cheap) suitcase with a front zip-up pocket. It got to the US okay, but on the next (domestic US) leg of the journey, the front panel had been torn off - it was hanging by a scrap of fabric and the contents of the case were protected only ...


14

They will get wet, twice. Luggage are almost always transported in small chains of relatively flat carts pulled by a motor vehicle. Then, a conveyor belt loads them into the plane as works move each piece from the carts to the belt. As some comments say, the carts sometimes are covered, which I have seen but it was not complete coverage, so water will still ...


12

Assuming you are flying on scheduled airline service, the employees who last handled the bag should pick it up with its contents, put it in some larger container and take it somewhere where someone will attempt to make it so it will last the remainder of the segments to the stated destination on the bag tag. That can be done with anything, including duct ...


11

A friend of mine has a small glass (beer, wine, vodka, whisky, etc.) collection and I buy glasses every now and then for him when I travel. I know it's probably not the same but most of the tips can probably be applied to any other fragile item. Glasses can be very fragile, specially the ones with a foot. I have transported them both in hand luggage and ...


11

I had to do exactly that once, at London Heathrow. What I did was to give the old bag to one of the cleaners emptying the bins. He took it and probably disposed it somewhere.


10

I have checked in many a cabin sized piece of luggage and never noticed them being handled any different from bigger sized items. At times I have chatted with the check-in staff when checking in a small case, they always reacted in a way that suggested that it is often done. They do understand the need when you are having two pieces when only one is allowed ...


10

No need to buy a new suitcase! Don't all international airports have a luggage wrapping service? If you arrive at the airport to find your luggage slightly broken, the luggage wrapping service will be a good solution. It is a better solution that buying a new suitcase in the airport. When they wrap the luggage, they often cut out the wheels and handles, so ...


10

Most customs agencies in modern countries have some method for you to claim in the event of damage caused to your posessions / luggage / souvenirs. For example, since you mention Australia, on their Australian Customs and Border Protection Service website they have a publically published Policy for dealing with allegations of damage at Cargo and Container ...


8

As an objective criteria I would suggest packing things so that the suitcase could be dropped from a height of 3' (1m) in any orientation without damage. Doing that, I have had no problems with broken glass bottles or other relatively fragile stuff. If you can fit the items into a shoe or boot, that helps, and of course surround it with clothes and keep it ...


7

According to easyJet's Carrier Regulations: If your baggage is damaged, lost or delayed during an easyJet flight, you must advise a member of easyJet ground handling staff at the airport of arrival immediately. In the event of loss or damage to baggage the airline's liability is normally limited to a maximum of 1,000 Special Drawing Rights (...


7

The exact liability an airline will have for lost or damaged baggage is dependent on the airline (specifically, its Contract of Carriage or equivalent document) and the applicable laws of the country/countries involved. In general, airlines are indeed liable for both the bag and its contents. For the specific case of easyJet, their liability policy says: ...


7

I flew from mainland France to Mayotte, last summer, and the Mahores have some interesting strategies for "cheap luggage". Many of them were using big coolers wrapped in plastic, for example. Others had simple "bundles" of clothes also wrapped in plastic. ... It was all very exotic, though all of them were sufficiently wrapped up to not have any loose bit ...


6

What? 50 EUR? And what about their Conditions of carriage which state: VUELING shall be liable in cases of destruction, loss, delay or damage to luggage, up to a sum of 1,131 Special Drawing Rights per passenger. 1131 SDR is 1429.23 EUR right now. And this is not something Vueling came up with, this is Article 22(2) of the Montreal Convention. Every ...


6

As @Doc said, X-ray do not damage electronic devices, however, metal detectors may. I had the personal experience of forgetting to take out my cellphone from my pocket when I went through a metal detector, and it passed way with a nasty smell of burned circuits...


6

I believe that compensation for lost or damaged luggage is always with the airline who flies the last leg of your journey. I've never heard of an airport dealing with luggage issues.


6

You should probably attempt these in the given order: If the broken bag is small enough compared to the new one, place it within the new bag Ask security Ask your airline personnel Leave the suitcase open and as obviously empty as you can make it next to a bin with a piece of paper that says "TRASH" or equivalent


6

I would not trust the patch alone. The frame of the suitcase does not provide a place where you can press the iron firmly down. To make it endure another trip, you can take two towels and lay them flat inside the empty suitcase so that they overlap the outsides. Then repack all your stuff. Valuables go into a shopping bag in the centre. Then to close ...


5

Odds are they'll require all devices to go through the scanners, because officially, they cause no damage. From the TSA's Packing Tips page: TSA will screen any "Carry-on" baggage that will fit through the x-ray machine; However, looking at that, there are a few points that some stuff could get damaged: Don't put film in your checked baggage, as ...


5

As Andrew said, it's very unlikely that they'll prevent you from checking it in. I flew from the UK to Sweden last year. The suitcase I had was broken: the handle was locked in the topmost position, and it was impossible to "push it back" into the suitcase again. The airline had me sign a waiver, saying that the suitcase was already damaged, and after that ...


5

There are few things you can try : go to a luggage repair center and ask for a repair quote ask the place where you ordered it originally to provide a copy of the invoice (or at least a proof that you bought it there with the price at that time) check your credit card insurance. You might be covered in this situation (even if it seems pretty specific) The ...


5

I have flown with many duffel bags as hold luggage and I have never had a problem with the handles. The warning you quote refers mostly to big rucksacks which have thick loose shoulder straps, and maybe even chest and waist straps. Having said this, if you want to be extra careful with your luggage there are a few options you can consider: Get a rucksack ...


4

I agree with the initial response - that there are probably laws (variations on the same - for each country)but hard to enforce or redress. I recently experienced the same situation - unnecessary damage to property by customs. I was shipping a busker Organ (street organ)from Panama to the UK for repairs. The recipient discovered the packaging was in good ...


4

The reply is actually on the site of the TURKISH AIRLINES: Damage or Loss If damage to the baggage is of a kind that can be immediately ascertained (such as broken wheels or handles, tears or missing contents) the passenger must, on the same day and before leaving the arrival hall, applying to Station Lost and Found Offices with their Travel ticket, ...


4

I had the same problem once in Frankfurt airport. When you buy the new suitcase you can ask the seller to keep your old one. They will know exactly what to do with it. They are usually really happy of selling the suitcase, so they will help you in any way to complete the sell.


4

The following issues are to consider: 1) Heavy objects in your hand become a mortal projectile in case of emergency braking and other sudden movements. So you must keep the object in the overhead compartment or under the seat in front of you. Otherwise, it could break your neck, or somebody else's. 2) There is more room for movement in the overhead ...


4

I would prefer repair tape (easily available on Amazon or from camping supply stores) to an iron on patch. Plastic on the suitcase might melt when you use the iron. Here are some tape images: I own some of the Tenacious tape myself but have yet to use it on a suitcase. I take it on long trips and all camping trips. Reviews suggest people repair tents, ...


4

There is always some normal wear and tear to bags, just by the nature of being shoved and manually put in the ULD (Unit Load Device) - that's what the giant boxes are called that are used to load luggage in the airplane's cargo hold. If it is small in size, it may be handled with less care as it is easy to pick up and place. You may want to ask for a ...


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