113

As a British person, I don't think I've ever seen somebody with a beard like that. Some drunk people might be snarky about it but my guess is that you'll get much more attention from people who think it's cool and almost none from people who want to be shitty about it. If you're in the UK in August, the 2018 British Beard and Moustache Championships will be ...


69

Oktoberfest is a major international tourist festival in a modern, progressive country. No one will question your attendance, no matter how you look. The only reason it would be awkward is if you told everyone that you didn't like German beer! [The only suggestion of racism I could find was where an Asian customer was asked to move from a table at ...


66

Aniket basically said the right thing but let me clarify a few things. There are many regions/groups of people in India but for myself the Bengali example is the best. It is very common for Bengalis to have two names, one of which (bhalo naam) is the legal name used on all official documents. The other (dak naam) is a colloquial name used by family and ...


66

According to the legend this tradition was started by hotels in the 19th century. Unlike today there was a single bathroom for a whole floor. This room was at the beginning of the hallway and not a real guest room. Hoteliers therefore used the room number "00". Other common explanations include the shape of an opened toilet seat but as far as I know that ...


63

Taking Complimentaries Home I would say that it all boils down to how cheap you want to look, in the eyes of the hotel management. If you don't care, and probably you shouldn't, then there are some things you can take with you upon check-out. Taking Consumables As a general rule I would say: you can take anything that is single-serving. For the purpose ...


63

It depends on how you define "western countries", but if you think of Western Europe + UK + US/Canada, please rest assured that nobody would care whether you use sticks, fork, spoon or hands (well, this one is a bit of stretch) to eat your rice. So yes, this is ok. If you don't get a spoon, please ask for one. Please also note that not every kind of rice ...


50

To deal with your various questions: Yes you can bring your car into Amish country. While the area is home to many Amish families it is not run along Amish lines. There are roads and shops and all the usual things you would find. If you have actual business on an Amish farm then they are OK with you driving onto it, just as you would visiting any other ...


42

Here's an excerpt from Wikitravel: Although many visitors, especially Americans, may feel apprehensive about visiting Hiroshima, it is a friendly, welcoming city, with as much interest in Western culture as anywhere else in Japan. Tourists are welcomed, and exhibits related to the atomic bomb are not concerned with blame or accusations. Bear in mind, ...


42

As someone who always used to eat rice with a spoon, the first time I moved to the US for studies and saw people eating rice with a fork, I couldn't stand it. I tried it myself, but damn it - trying to balance the rice grains, without having them fall through the forks was annoying. At first, I would ask for a spoon. This raised some eyebrows, but nothing ...


40

Let me first state that I've lived in Dubai for a solid 19 years (years 0 to 19). In these 19 years, I have done almost everything there is to do in Dubai and been almost every place there is to go (including going to night clubs even though I was under age). At the outset, let me clarify this: I'd wish to visit Dubai with my girlfriend, but after ...


37

TL;DR: It's complicated, but in practice, yes, building snowmen is still allowed for everybody. A fatwa is not a law, it's a ruling by an Islamic scholar that's technically only binding on the person who issued it, not all Muslims in Saudi Arabia, much less all people there. This particular fatwa does not appear to originate from the Permanent Committee, ...


36

I think it's just a cultural difference. The "two sheet" system is commonly used in homes in the US. So US hotels use the same system because it's familiar to most of their guests. (The US is a big country with lots of domestic travel, and most hotel guests would be Americans rather than travelers from abroad.) (As a clarification, the most common system ...


34

Various online sources (Lonely Planet, Tripadvisor, USA Today, Dubai FAQ) seem to agree that as long as you don't start making out in public and telling people that you're not married, or attract the attention of the police in other ways, you'll be breaking the law but are very unlikely to get into trouble. People in general, and hotel staff especially ...


34

I stayed a long time in rural Aceh, so here are my tips: First of all, do not think of Indonesians as very religious. They are usually traditionalist (some may say conformist). This is different. Cover yourself You should both wear pants below the knees and real shirt (no tank top), no cleavage, no belly button displayed. Nobody will throw rocks at you if ...


34

Unless you are in a situation where very specific etiquette is expected, no one will care one bit about which utensil you use. Such specific etiquette may be expected in diplomatic or high value business meetings, but for casual, or even formal dining, it is not. It is not uncommon to see Americans pick up bite sized morsels with a knife when the fork is ...


32

Munich local here. We welcome everyone at Oktoberfest, doesn't matter where you're from or how you look. The only things you really have to be careful about is getting excessively drunk (the beer is strong and plentiful), and getting into drunk arguments (which can get nasty when everyone has large, heavy glass steins in reach).


32

I've been that stranger. I once surreptitiously took a photo of (native) people in a rural Swedish village who I throught were dressed funnily. A young man noticed, and responded with a gesture of moving his finger across his neck. The villagers belonged to a religious sect that prohibits photography. Another time, I took a photo of a stairs in Stockholm....


31

What people usually do is putting on their boxers/underwear in the shower cubicle then come out and put on the rest. Some people do what Burhan described in the other answer as well.


31

Since this question is not tagged for Spain, and it is tagged for cultural-awareness and local-customs, then be aware that in some countries (including England and Wales) photography in a public place is generally unrestricted, and your principal recourse in such situations is not to go into those places, or to leave if you're getting annoyed at the ...


30

I'll try to address this question impartially despite my strong feelings against Mandatory Hijaab for women (I'm a male, born and raised in Iran who lives in United States now) I'll define the terms first and then will mention what is minimally required by the law. Hijaab (means veil in Arabic) is a religious term. It's definition varies across cultures, ...


29

TL; DR: Yes. I grew up in Malaysia and I am a non-Muslim. I have been inside Putra Mosque, in the capital city of Putrajaya. It was part of a class field trip I had when I was in school. However, you should pay close attention to etiquette and expected behaviors as outlined in your own answer. The girls in my group wore long sleeves, and shawls to cover ...


24

I dispute the premise of your question. (All images from a google Image Search for "Welcome to [State Name]") You can find examples for all 50 states at this site - note however that while all 50 states are represented, that list is far from exhaustive of all the designs and styles that can be found, depending upon which border crossing you're at. Many ...


24

As Jonathan's answer mentions, pretty much all police officers open carry firearms in the U.S. (pistols on their belt.) Other than that, however, seeing people visibly carry their firearms is very rare in the U.S. (unless you're at a gun range or some such thing.) I live in one of the most gun-friendly parts of the U.S. and I almost never see a firearm ...


24

This is the Chinese character for "Good Fortune" 福. January 28 was the Chinese (Lunar) New Year.


23

It is perfectly fine. The call to prayer is frequently televised so there is nothing wrong with recording it and posting it on youtube. It is done often. However, do not go to the mosque during prayer and start recording there. Its not that its not allowed, its just that you'll have to have prior permission and you may be a distraction to the congregation.


22

Wrap a towel around your waist (or use a dressing gown/shower gown and face the locker) and then change your trunks/shorts.


22

When you meet them. You may well get "reverse omiyage" from your friend when you're leaving, though!


22

Your good name is basically your first name. It's a throwback from our British colonial days... where a gentleman would ask another who is not of acquaintance and would like to be friendly - "May I ask your good name, sir?" or something on those terms. And if they ask for your full name - well you tell your full name. In India, it's preferable to use "...


21

A quick scan of Wikivoyage's guide to Hiroshima sights indicate that memorials and museums to the attack have English-language information. If they didn't intend non-Japanese to visit the place, they wouldn't have such information. I seriously doubt that they'd regard the USA differently from other non-Japanese countries in this context, even though the USA ...


21

I visited last year. My pure understanding of the law there obviously isn't perfect as an outsider, but the following of the 'law' seemed very rough, women would wear a covering, but sometimes only over the bob of a pony-tail, for example. However, if in a place of business, eg a hotel or restaurant, you'd regularly see proprietors or staff quickly address ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible