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43

A little bit of history: (from the top of my head, there is very little to find about this on the web I think, even in Spanish): At some point during the Cuban Revolution and before I was born, being in possesion of any foreing currencies in Cuba became illegal (unless you had a special permit from the government). Many Cubans spent time in jail for this ...


27

Google reverse image search locates the original of this picture. It is the Fausto Theatre in Havana. The ants were a temporary exhibit.


25

I believe you are mixing two pieces of advice. The best currencies are Euros, Canadian Dollars... This is because of the trade embargo against Cuba from the USA. This means US dollars are very expensive to exchange in Cuba, so other currencies should be used. Euros are often said to get the best exchange rate. This is not saying that vendors, hotels or ...


20

No, travel is still not completely free. However, you are now allowed to travel to Cuba and spend money there legally under the following 12 categories: family visits official business of the U.S. government, foreign governments, and certain intergovernmental organizations journalistic activity professional research and professional meetings educational ...


20

That is the Teatro Fausto, on the corner of Prado and Colon, in Havana Cuba. The "ants" you see in the photo were an artist's exhibit in 2012 for the Havana Biennial. They are no longer on the building.


16

You've got it more or less backwards. The restrictions are essentially aimed at controlling the rate at which hard currency (i.e. USD / EUR) leaves the country, so goods which are imported are only available with CUC. Therefore there is high demand among Cubans for CUC. As a rule of thumb, if you manage to get sufficiently off the beaten track that people ...


15

Coaches in Cuba - Astro and Viazul There are two main coach companies providing island-wide transport in Cuba: AstroBus and Viazul. Astro caters mostly to Cuban residents and intrepid travellers. Most of the seats are available for purchase only to residents with a valid ID, and just a few are available for foreigners albeit at higher rates. Overall its ...


11

I have a friend of a friend who used a prepaid AMIGO TRAVEL CLUB card in Cuba. They are a bank in Antigua and he was able to open an account online as an American citizen. I think this also involved e-mailing them a copy of his passport and driver's license. Once the account is open, you can charge the account by wire transfer from your bank and then ...


11

The Cuba Information Manual ("The Definitive Guide to Legal and Illegal Travel to Cuba") says: The embargo laws do not forbid U.S. citizens from traveling to Cuba. They do, however, forbid U.S. citizens from spending money there without the proper permits, which essentially amounts to the same thing—unless you plan on begging your way around the ...


11

It's the Fausto Theater, as identified on this photo blog. More information on the history of the theatre found on cinematreasures.org. Located in the Habana Vieja (old town) district of Havana, on the Prado at the corner of Esquina Colon in the Jaruco neighborhood. The Cine-Teatro Fausto was built in 1938 and designed in an Art Deco style, by ...


11

Legally speaking, you are not permitted to travel to Cuba from the United States for touristic purposes. The regulations bind "persons subject to US jurisdiction" which includes most people who happen to be in the United States, regardless of their citizenship, as well as US citizens wherever they are. As you will be in the United States at the time of ...


11

Yes: "Cuban nationals applying for admission to the United States, as well as third-country nationals, with a valid visa or other travel authorization issued by the U.S. government may be transported to the United States from Cuba. [...] This includes individuals eligible to enter the United States under the Visa Waiver Program (VWP), as administered ...


10

The official place to exchange currencies is CADECA, this entity purchases and sell certain currencies according to Cuban Central Bank Rates. These rates are updated daily. You can find CADECAs in the airport, and in major cities. Exchange rates should be the same country wide. Note that you will be exchanging your GBP for CUC and not for Cuban Peso, ...


9

As an American citizen you are required to the follow the laws of the USA despite any other nationality that you may have. Most laws don't apply to citizens residing abroad, but some do. Perhaps the most significant is paying taxes on world-wide income, but also includes participating in the selective service (military draft), reporting foreign bank account ...


9

These are entirely different classes of travel. Portugal+Spain is an easy trip within the usual Western world, close to home and without any significant apparent dangers other than the usual pickpockets and the expensive Euro zone. You can easily get home if needed (regular flights from Madrid and Barcelona directly to TLV, connections through all around ...


9

I don't know what the law is, but when I was on Cuba, I always left my passport in the hotel safe and carried a copy. I spent some hours in a police station in Havana but I don't think anybody ever wanted to see my passport. Many Europeans also have an identity card, I often carry that with me as a form of authentication. It doesn't help you to get into the ...


9

I actually asked this question a few months ago to a representative of a Cuban consulate. She told me that it is a good idea to use a photocopy of the passport, but only if I can provide some other additional indentification with a picture, like a health insurance card, a driver license, a resident card etc. However, if you ever need to do a currency ...


9

Skyscanner also finds plenty of flights to Cuba. (By KLM, Air Canada, Aeroflot, Air France, etc). Skyscanner Ltd is based in Edinburgh, Scotland. I tried DFW–HAV too, and yes, it found connections (through MEX, mostly):


9

The US restrictions on travel to Cuba are found in the Treasury Department regulations. The prohibitions generally apply either to "any person within the United States" or "any person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States." The first term is defined at 31 CFR 515.330: (a) The term person within the United States, includes: (1) Any person,...


8

Sounds like what you have is a "Tourist Card". There is no need to stick this into your passport - just keep it with your passport when entering Cuba and during your stay. When entering Cuba they will normally not stamp your passport itself (although they will if you ask), but will instead stamp the tourist card. When exiting the country they will collect ...


8

In Rent-a-Car facilities in this time of the year prices starts from $70 to $150 or more, this depends on the car type, how many days etc. Price need to be confirmed in-place. Refer to transport-related information in Cuba. I don't think car seats are available. Hope this helps.


8

There's an interesting read on what to expect at VeganCuba.com. It's more towards Vegans than just vegetarians, so some of it may be relevant to you. The Havana Times newspaper has published a great piece a couple of years ago entitled "A Vegetarian in Cuba" (I'm hearing that to the tune of Sting's "Englishman in New York"). It's written by a local, and ...


8

US citizens are not permitted to travel to Cuba without special permission from the Department of Treasury. This also includes "payment for air travel to Cuba". Source: U.S. Department of Treasury, Office of Foreign Assets Control, Part 515 Cuban Assets Control Whether you get caught or not is another matter (they won't stamp your passport), but personally ...


8

I have U.S. residency (Green Card). Do I need a visa to visit Canada or can I use my Green Card? As a U.S. Green Card holder, you do not need a temporary resident visa to travel to Canada. At the Canadian border, you will need to present your valid passport and Green Card. Citizenship and Immigration Canada


8

According to the US Department of State, Tourist travel to Cuba is prohibited under U.S. law for U.S. citizens and others under U.S. jurisdiction. Legally traveling to Cuba as a US Citizen requires a reason specified under one of several types of licenses to do so. General & Specific Licenses for Travel: The U.S. Department of the Treasury’s ...


8

Like any medical specialists, in any country, advance booking is likely a necessity. You could walk in but if they're busy or on leave, you wouldn't be able to see anyone. So I'd recommend contacting a few in advance. This is relatively easy to do online: The Frank Pais Orthopedic Hospital in Havana (I saw this when I went through the city in July) has ...


8

I stayed in Cuba last summer. Accidentally, I found a reliable, safe and at the same time cheap casas particulares network. I wrote about it in my Spanish blog (sorry for the SPAM, but I thing it could be interesting to read it in Spanish or using a translator). To sum up: The 'head' of the network is in the Hamel Hostel (La Habana). It will cost 5 USD per ...


8

Note: It appears that recent US rule changes have made these OFAC declarations applicable to anyone transiting through a US airport whether they are a US citizen/resident or not. Thus it appears that the US won't permit anyone to travel from the US to Cuba for tourism. The original answer was: For those of you playing along at home, here is a copy of the ...


8

I've received a reply for Booking's Twitter profile on this matter: Hi XXXXX, reviews for accommodations in Cuba are no longer displayed in order to comply to a local regulation. If you have more questions, feel free to contact us at any time. Presumably by "local regulations" they mean the embargo placed on Cuba by the US.


7

I have also been in Cuba more than 5 years ago and I have never carried my passport. My passport was always in the hotel safe and I carried a copy of the first few pages. Maybe you should ask what's best to do from the customs agent at the Cuban airport.


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